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Road Home Program

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NATIONAL
November 14, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Labeau longs to move back into her four-bedroom, shotgun-style home from the trailer she and her two sons have occupied since Hurricane Katrina ravaged the house more than a year ago. But the $7.5-million Road Home program, which provides money to renovate and rebuild storm-damaged homes, hasn't come through for Labeau yet, and is being widely criticized for the slow pace of its payouts.
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NATIONAL
November 14, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Shirley Labeau longs to move back into her four-bedroom, shotgun-style home from the trailer she and her two sons have occupied since Hurricane Katrina ravaged the house more than a year ago. But the $7.5-million Road Home program, which provides money to renovate and rebuild storm-damaged homes, hasn't come through for Labeau yet, and is being widely criticized for the slow pace of its payouts.
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NATIONAL
August 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Homeowners filed applications in large numbers ahead of a midnight deadline to request government compensation for damage from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Nearly two years after Katrina devastated New Orleans, authorities have been heavily criticized for being slow to settle claims and hand out payments while much of the city sits damaged and deserted.
NATIONAL
March 21, 2007 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco said Tuesday that she would not seek reelection this fall. Blanco, a Democrat, has seen her popularity plummet due in large part to the state's sluggish recovery from hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. With nine months left in her term, Blanco said her withdrawal from the race would allow initiatives she planned to raise in the upcoming legislative session to move forward without being hampered by partisan politics.
OPINION
August 28, 2010
Sunday marks the fifth anniversary of the day Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Louisiana and Mississippi coastlines, causing the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history. Waters flowing over or through shattered levees flooded an estimated 80% of New Orleans, driving out more than half the population and devastating the local economy. Scenes from the flood are being replayed across television networks and websites this week, reminding Americans about the multiple governmental failures that helped cause and prolong the suffering.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
The chartered jet that lifted off at dawn recently from New Orleans carried 131 Louisiana women -- homemakers, professionals, full-time volunteers and local celebrities, dressed for political combat in pastel power suits, smart skirt outfits and discreet jewelry. As they sipped coffee and munched scones, their conversations ranged from their kids' progress at school to next month's reopening of a downtown landmark, Saks Fifth Avenue.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2009 | Richard Fausset
This city is a rarity in 2009: a place full of hard hats and big building projects and subcontractors roaring around in pickup trucks. A city where home prices have dipped only slightly, and where the unemployment rate is 5.3% -- compared with 8.1% nationwide. New Orleans, it seems, has largely dodged the Category 5 recession pummeling the rest of the country, thanks to its unique post-Katrina economy. For locals accustomed to bad luck and trouble, the good news can feel a little strange.
NATIONAL
August 27, 2006 | Ann M. Simmons, Richard Fausset and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
From the ghostly streets of New Orleans' abandoned neighborhoods to Mississippi's downtrodden coastline, the first anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's onslaught is arriving with emerging signs of federal money at work -- rented trailers parked in the driveways of flood-ravaged homesteads, teams of Army engineers overseeing levee repairs, beaches swept clean of debris.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2006 | Kevin Sack and Ann Simmons, Times Staff Writers
For blacks in New Orleans at the height of Jim Crow, there were few aspirations higher than owning one of the modest brick bungalows in Pontchartrain Park. When postal workers and teachers and longshoremen wrote their last rent checks and moved into the newly developed subdivision, they crossed a portal directly into the middle class. "It was something special," said Cherrylane Johnson, whose father, Thomas, bought a new four-bedroom house on Athis Court in 1962 for $18,000.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2007 | Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writer
'DO you have a pioneering spirit?" read the recent ad in the Jewish Week newspaper of New York. "Are you searching for a meaningful community where YOU can make a difference?" To generations of American Jews, the pitch had a familiar ring. But this was not an invitation to settle the Promised Land. It was a call to repopulate New Orleans, a city known less for its Jewish culture than for its shellfish, sin and pre-Lenten carnival.
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