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NEWS
January 20, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Addiction recovery facilities vary widely in approaches to treatment - not to mention in costs, resources, staffing and many other factors. Picking a place to pursue recovery isn't easy. The federal government has stepped in to help with the creation of resource material to guide consumers in finding the right place for treatment. The free guide , available on the National Institute on Drug Abuse website or in booklet form, is called "Seeking Drug Abuse Treatment: Know What to Ask. " "Treatment options can vary considerably, and families often don't know where to begin," NIDA Director Nora Volkow said in a news release.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
April 26, 2014 | Chris Erskine
I'm nothing if not a futurist, so as we explore here the nuances of postmodern parenting, we look ahead to what kind of parents our own offspring will one day be: well-meaning pushovers or total tyrants? "I'm going to be such a Nazi," the daughter of a co-worker announces. "I'm going to be the perfect compromise of the two," predicts my older daughter, lovely and patient and - at 30 - eager to start a family of her own. Not even a mother yet, and you can spot my daughter's maternal instincts starting to kick in, softening her feisty, bossy-pants exterior.
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OPINION
December 13, 2010
In October, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed funding that had been set aside to provide childcare subsidies for people who have moved off welfare. If allowed to stand, the veto would cost more than the savings it would provide because it would send people from their newfound self-sufficiency right back onto the welfare rolls. The Assembly reached into its own operating budget to extend the CalWorks Stage 3 child-care services program by a few crucial weeks, and now in the special session lawmakers plan to re-adopt the program and send it to incoming Gov. Jerry Brown.
TRAVEL
February 9, 2014
Regarding "What's the Best Way to Go, Map or GPS?" [On the Spot, by Catharine Hamm, Feb. 2]: I think the best answer is, "Both!" Except for a road map of the entire island of Ireland, which appeared to have every highway, street and lane, even the Michelin maps lack sufficient detail when you're trying to get to a specific address. For this, the GPS is much better. Since we got a GPS, my wife and I no longer yell at each other, "Which way? and "I don't know. The map doesn't say!
BUSINESS
April 2, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Business owners often have a tricky relationship with the idea of giving immigrant workers a path to citizenship. On the one hand, employers (usually) want to keep their workers happy and working hard, which often means seeing their families more than once a year. On the other hand, workers who have citizenship have less incentive to stay with one employer, and may leave tough, low-paying jobs for other work, leaving employers in the lurch. “If the guest workers did become citizens, some of them would probably stay, they enjoy the farm work, and like working outside,” said Rusty Barr, a farmer featured in a Sunday story about immigration reform.
OPINION
April 5, 2002
President Bush's welcome change of strategy Thursday provides a road map to end the slaughter in the Middle East. His dispatch of Secretary of State Colin L. Powell offers a navigator for the journey. Bush's declaration that "enough is enough" was days overdue, as was the evenhanded tone of his remarks.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
South African President Jacob Zuma said Sunday that Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi had accepted a "road map" for ending the conflict that pits his forces against rebels determined to end his four-decade rule. Zuma, who according to news reports led a delegation of African Union leaders in a meeting with Kadafi at his compound in Tripoli, did not disclose details of the cease-fire proposal. He also didn't specify whether Kadafi himself or his adjutants had accepted the African Union plan.
SPORTS
February 16, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
This is the week of the Accenture Match Play golf tournament near Tucson. It was also the week Tiger Woods was coming back, according to published reports. Well, he's not, and our sympathy goes out to tournament organizers, whose media requests went from 800 to eight. Still, all logic says Tiger is not going to be gone forever. You can't be able to hit a two-iron 250 yards and straight and not play again. The golf gods won't allow that. We've all pretty much gotten over the revelations that he isn't St. Peter.
OPINION
April 24, 2003
Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich sits on the Pentagon's Defense Policy Board along with other neoconservatives, including former CIA Director R. James Woolsey and Reagan-era Assistant Defense Secretary Richard Perle. The board serves as a brain trust for Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld and his chief deputies. These include neocons Paul D. Wolfowitz, the deputy secretary of Defense and an architect of Iraq policy, and Undersecretary Douglas J. Feith.
OPINION
November 24, 2004
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's meetings with Israelis and Palestinians this week produced encouraging comments about scheduled elections in January for a successor to Yasser Arafat as head of the Palestinian Authority. The goal of free elections is attainable, but the Palestinians must first stop killing Israelis, who in turn have to relax restrictions on Palestinians so they can vote.
SPORTS
October 25, 2013 | By Chris Foster
Oregon football teams had spent a total of five weeks in the Associated Press top 10 from the poll's inception in 1936 through the 1999 season. Mike Bellotti, Oregon's coach from 1995-2008, decided to clear-cut the landscape. The Ducks set out to become the nouveau riche in college football. More than a decade later, Oregon sits above those with greater pedigree, ranked second, right behind old-money Alabama. UCLA players, coaches and fans can look across the field at Autzen Stadium on Saturday and see that promised land.
WORLD
October 14, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Paul Richter
TEHRAN -- With international talks on Iran's nuclear program set to begin Tuesday, Iranian officials said their negotiating team would offer a broad “road map” proposal for resolving the issue, but would also seek to protect key aspects of the country's nuclear program. Iran's state-controlled media quoted officials saying that they would offer to halt the medium-enrichment of uranium, a process that brings it within reach of the concentration required for nuclear bombs. But reports also insisted that Iran wouldn't halt low-level enrichment, and wouldn't close its underground enrichment facility at Fordo, or the Arak heavy-water plant that critics fear is intended to open the way to a plutonium-based nuclear weapon.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Business owners often have a tricky relationship with the idea of giving immigrant workers a path to citizenship. On the one hand, employers (usually) want to keep their workers happy and working hard, which often means seeing their families more than once a year. On the other hand, workers who have citizenship have less incentive to stay with one employer, and may leave tough, low-paying jobs for other work, leaving employers in the lurch. “If the guest workers did become citizens, some of them would probably stay, they enjoy the farm work, and like working outside,” said Rusty Barr, a farmer featured in a Sunday story about immigration reform.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral and City Council candidates should address air, soil, water and energy problems in their campaigns and the winners should push for specific measures to meet those challenges, UCLA researchers said in a report released Tuesday. The report aims to ignite debate among candidates over their commitment to confronting environmental issues, including constrained water supplies, greenhouse gas emissions and tighter government budgets. "We're hoping that candidate debates from 2013 to 2021 will be loaded with questions derived from our plan," said Mark Gold, associate director of UCLA's Institute of Environment and Sustainability.
OPINION
November 28, 2012
There are big differences in how well Los Angeles' teachers help their students learn, a new study shows - bigger variations than in other districts, where teaching quality appears more even. The study also indicates that teachers in the L.A. Unified School District who receive advanced degrees aren't more effective than others, but those with national board certification are. The district's program for training teachers, pulling mostly from its ranks of classroom aides, produces more effective teachers than those who come from traditional teacher colleges, and they're much more likely to stay with the district than recruits from the prestigious Teach for America organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan
NEW YORK - As they swept through airports while making their ambitious, risky new movie, "Cloud Atlas," directors Andy and Lana Wachowski got used to answering a surprisingly tough question from customs officials. "They'd say, 'What's your movie about?'" said Andy. "It's about the sum of human experience. They always look up and go, 'Oh, really…'" "Our target audience is customs officials," whispered Lana. PHOTOS: Scenes from 'Cloud Atlas' Actually, their target audience is grown-ups.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
A key Western government and Libyan rebels on Monday reacted coolly to an African Union "road map" for peace between forces loyal and opposed to Moammar Kadafi because it did not include provisions for the removal of the longtime ruler and his family. Meanwhile, rebels aided by North Atlantic Treaty Organization airstrikes appear to have fended off a weekend military advance on the strategic city of Ajdabiya amid heavy fighting and casualties. A small demonstration broke out against the truce proposal in the Libyan rebel stronghold of Benghazi, while various spokesmen for the transitional rebel government rejected the offer, several news agencies reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral and City Council candidates should address air, soil, water and energy problems in their campaigns and the winners should push for specific measures to meet those challenges, UCLA researchers said in a report released Tuesday. The report aims to ignite debate among candidates over their commitment to confronting environmental issues, including constrained water supplies, greenhouse gas emissions and tighter government budgets. "We're hoping that candidate debates from 2013 to 2021 will be loaded with questions derived from our plan," said Mark Gold, associate director of UCLA's Institute of Environment and Sustainability.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
There must be a reason that every time I hear the term "fiscal cliff," the image that comes to mind is of Wile E. Coyote pumping his feet in midair just before plunging into the valley below. Is it that the debate over when and how to cure the federal deficit has reached new heights of cartoonish inanity? That we are now being treated to finger-wagging about the need to get our fiscal house in order by corporate CEOs like JPMorgan Chase's Jamie Dimon (trading loss $5.8 billion and counting, potential cost to ratepayers from alleged manipulation of the California electricity market $200 million and counting)
BUSINESS
June 9, 2012 | By Michael Oneal
WILMINGTON, Del. — The judge in Tribune Co.'s bankruptcy case said he planned to write a formal opinion on the company's restructuring plan and hoped to have something ready by early July. At that time, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Kevin Carey suggested at a confirmation hearing Friday, he will either approve the plan or provide Tribune and its creditors with a road map for how to fix it so that it can be confirmed. After 31/2 years in Bankruptcy Court, Tribune officials were hoping that the judge would give a more definitive signal that he planned to approve the plan.
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