Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoad Safety
IN THE NEWS

Road Safety

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 22, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
About 3,000 vehicles equipped to share information about their speed and location have hit the roads in Ann Arbor, Mich., as part of the largest road test to date of so-called connected vehicles. The wireless technology enables the vehicles and the traffic infrastructure to talk to one another in real time to help avoid crashes and improve traffic flow, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, which is running the test in conjunction with the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
It shouldn't have come to this, but it did: Some drivers need to be reminded that no cyclist --  anywhere, ever -- deserves to be hit or killed in a car accident. I say this after reading the comments to my colleague Robert Greene's post this week noting that motorists who strike and sometimes kill cyclists are often sent home by police without so much as a citation. In response, several readers implied that the injured or deceased had it coming. Why? Because bike riders sometimes slow cars down.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 26, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, Robin Fields covers consumer issues for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7810 and at robin.fields@latimes.com
As you hurtle down California's freeways this week, spare a moment to remember the importance of seat belts and child safety seats. It's Buckle Up America week, the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's annual reminder to drivers and passengers that vehicle restraint systems are lifesavers--and aren't optional.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
About 3,000 vehicles equipped to share information about their speed and location have hit the roads in Ann Arbor, Mich., as part of the largest road test to date of so-called connected vehicles. The wireless technology enables the vehicles and the traffic infrastructure to talk to one another in real time to help avoid crashes and improve traffic flow, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, which is running the test in conjunction with the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | OTTO STRONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accidents such as Monday's head-on collision on Laguna Canyon Road have prompted local and state officials to re-examine what can be done to increase safety on the county's roads. Monday's accident left two people in critical condition, and others on Laguna Canyon Road--which has a gruesome history of accidents involving motorists, cyclists and pedestrians--have claimed four lives since November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1996
As Los Angeles city attorney, I fully support the general premise of your March 3 editorial headlined "Paying Dearly for Inaction." Certain roadways in the city, such as La Tuna Canyon Road, should be made safer, and there is no doubt that a history of litigation involving dangerous conditions along such roadways should be a catalyst for getting repairs done. I was surprised, however, to read in your editorial a paragraph stating that "no official mechanism exists" to correct roadway deficiencies discovered during litigation against the city and that after settling a lawsuit, my office "rarely follows up" with the city department involved.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | From Reuters
French Premier Michel Rocard on Tuesday pledged a powerful attack against what he called the nation's "totally suicidal lack of care" about road safety. "We are going to attack these problems powerfully. I've had enough of all these ruined destinies," Rocard said in an interview published in the France Soir evening daily. He said road accidents are costing France $16 billion a year. "We could overhaul the French education system with that money.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1998 | JASON TAKENOUCHI
The Esplanade shopping center will launch its annual "Safety Town" program for children today. A cooperative effort between the center and the Oxnard Police Department, the free program teaches children ages 4 to 7 the rules of the road, including stoplights, bicycle safety and proper street crossing. The police will fingerprint and photograph participants to create free ID kits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1988 | MARIANN HANSEN, Times Staff Writer
California Department of Transportation and Laguna Beach officials will meet next week to discuss the next step in trying to make Laguna Canyon Road safer without widening it. The city waged a successful protest Wednesday at a hearing of the California Coastal Commission, which voted 6 to 5 to reject Caltrans' proposal to widen the scenic road from two lanes to four lanes on a 2.3-mile stretch from El Toro Road to Canyon Acres Drive.
AUTOS
October 8, 2003 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
An angry debate about immigration policy and national security has surrounded Senate Bill 60, the new California law that will let an estimated 2 million illegal immigrants apply for driver's licenses. No matter how you feel about illegal immigrants in social, political or economic terms, there is a highway safety issue involved in granting anyone a driver's license.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2012
A state of Florida investigation into a series of crashes that killed 11 motorists near Gainesville during one smoky, foggy, early morning in January has concluded that the Florida Highway Patrol committed multiple errors before the accidents, including a failure to effectively monitor the conditions on Interstate 75 as visibility worsened for motorists. The report, compiled by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, was ordered by Gov. Rick Scott and released Thursday morning.
AUTOS
May 30, 2007 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles motorists, as well as others around the nation, are being treated to an intensive period of ticketing, thanks to a $30-million program by the federal government. "Click it or ticket," say the electronic signs on major Southern California freeways, broadcasting the annoying advertising slogan adopted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. In L.A. County, those tickets cost between $69 and $181.
TRAVEL
February 12, 2006 | Kathleen Doheny, Special to The Times
DISEASES associated with travel -- SARS, bird flu, malaria -- grab most of the media attention and can trigger anxiety. But did you know a road accident is more likely to hurt you, especially if you are traveling in a developing country? That's true whether you are the driver, the occupant or even a pedestrian. Worldwide, about 1.17 million people die each year in road accidents, according to the U.S. State Department. That includes about 200 U.S. citizens killed in such accidents abroad.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2005 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita have demonstrated that, even with ample warning, natural disasters pose two problems when it comes to evacuating a city in peril: what to do when residents refuse to leave, and what to do when they all leave at once. In New Orleans, Hurricane Katrina provided evidence of a storm's capacity for carnage when people cannot, or will not, get out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2005 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
Laurie Morse considers herself one of the lucky ones. While driving from Ventura to her job in Santa Barbara on Jan. 10, Morse came to a standstill on northbound U.S. 101 after an early morning mudslide covered the roadway. Sitting in her 2003 Honda Civic, Morse said, she suddenly "heard a loud rumbling noise" and turned to see about 8 feet of sodden hillside headed directly for her.
MAGAZINE
August 29, 2004 | Sanjiv Bhattacharya, Sanjiv Bhattacharya's last story for the magazine was about a simulated Mars space station.
In 1981 the German Transportation Ministry conducted an experiment into the effectiveness of anti-lock braking systems, only to discover that no brakes can stop the hurtling imbecility of human nature. The ministry fitted half of the 91-car Munich taxi fleet with anti-lock brakes, which at the time were considered a major leap in road safety. Then it monitored the fleet for three years using accelerometers, which measure G-forces, and undercover passengers.
NEWS
March 31, 2001 | From Associated Press
Roundabouts, becoming more common in America's road system, reduce deadly automobile accidents at intersections by nearly 90%, researchers said Friday. Richard A. Retting, of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, said drivers have to get over their skepticism of the modernized traffic circles. "Mistakes at roundabouts result in fender-benders. Mistakes at stop signs and traffic signals can be catastrophic," said Retting, an author of the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1995 | KATE FOLMAR
Yanking the string that triggered a bellowing honk from the massive orange Caltrans truck in which she was perched, Jennifer Ruffin declared that she was learning about road safety. More importantly, the two California Department of Transportation trucks at Monlux Elementary School were fun, she said. "The horn is looouud ," the 5-year-old giggled. Ruffin was among about 100 Monlux kindergartners and preschoolers attending a road safety assembly Tuesday.
AUTOS
October 8, 2003 | Ralph Vartabedian, Times Staff Writer
An angry debate about immigration policy and national security has surrounded Senate Bill 60, the new California law that will let an estimated 2 million illegal immigrants apply for driver's licenses. No matter how you feel about illegal immigrants in social, political or economic terms, there is a highway safety issue involved in granting anyone a driver's license.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
The man who oversees Wisconsin's traffic safety programs and who backed a new, lower legal blood-alcohol level has been arrested on suspicion of drunk driving. John Evans was removed as Bureau of Transportation Safety director and will be reassigned to "different duties," said a Department of Transportation deputy administrator. Evans, 52, was arrested Friday, and a breath test showed a blood-alcohol level of 0.14. The legal level of intoxication is 0.10.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|