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NEWS
January 27, 1985 | PATRICK MOTT
In a county that has one of the busiest airports in the world, one of the wealthiest yacht basins, two of the most famous amusement parks and a fair number of the trendiest restaurants, the roadhouse in the boondocks could be as anachronistic as the 25-cent burger.
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NATIONAL
May 1, 2012 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
The place is packed when singer Mark Giovi takes the stage as emcee of the Monday night open-mike at a little roadhouse on a dusty stretch a few miles west of the Strip. Fronting a tight backup band of drums, keyboards and tenor saxophone, the veteran showman's voice is piano-key smooth as he launches into two Ray Charles standards, "You Don't Know Me" and "Georgia on My Mind. " But there's something peculiar about the way the 43-year-old New Jersey native moves about the room: his mouth droops slightly, his left hand hangs limp, his left leg is somewhat stiff.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1989 | RANDY LEWIS
BONNIE RAITT "Nick of Time." Capitol. . The adult world Bonnie Raitt sings about is lightyears away from the black-and-white pains and pleasures of teen rock. It's where people run out of time, out of patience, out of love and out of luck, but never out of hope and compassion. In an album that's as eclectic emotionally as musically, Raitt moves gracefully from the silky R&B of the poignant title tune to the wise and sassy rock of John Hiatt's "Thing Called Love" to the heartbreakingly elegant balladry of "I Ain't Gonna Let You Break My Heart Again" to the Fabulous Thunderbirds-backed roadhouse blues of "The Road's My Middle Name."
BUSINESS
August 18, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
When choosing its new chief executive, California Pizza Kitchen Inc. went for a taste of Texas-style steak by way of Kentucky. The new boss of the Los Angeles-based casual dining company will be G.J. Hart — recently CEO of western-themed chain Texas Roadhouse Inc., based in Louisville, Ky. CPK said Thursday that Hart would replace co-founders Rick Rosenfield and Larry Flax. The two former federal prosecutors launched the chain's first restaurant in Beverly Hills in 1985.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1986 | CRAIG LEE
Yes, Virginia, there are still rockabilly fans out there--people who don't seem to care if their absorption in this brand of American roots music is pretty passe, at least by the fad standards in trendy Los Angeles. As Dave Gomez of the Paladins told the small audience at the Lingerie on Wednesday night, "There's only a few of us left." A good few, if this trio from San Diego is any indication.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1987 | STEVE POND
* * * "GYPSY BLOOD." Mason Ruffner. CBS Associated. If the success of Robert Cray and the Fabulous Thunderbirds means that record buyers are developing a taste for blues-based American rock 'n' roll, Mason Ruffner deserves to be that audience's next discovery. On his second album, the Texas-based guitarist, singer and songwriter stomps his way through a batch of greasy, trashy roadhouse rockers, some of them dressed up in synthesizers and other modern duds.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
Jeff Healey is one tremendous guitarist, and he pretty much had to be Thursday night at the Coach House to make up for the 2 1/2 hours that passed before he came on-stage. With that time filled by: The tail end of the Lakers' defeat on big-screen TV. A crunch-bent opening band. A protracted stage setup, with plenty of hammering and feedback squeals, as the room grew progressively warmer, Healey had a lot of ill feeling to conquer. The early evening evidently hadn't been a picnic for Healey either, as he had been up in Burbank to appear on the "Tonight Show," only to be bumped for lack of time, and then encountered that bit of permanent sculpture known as Southland freeway traffic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Honestly, if you're not at least tempted to hum along with the cheeky refrain "There's nothing I would rather be, than to be an A-bo-rig-i-ne, and watch you take my precious land a-waaaaay" in Rachel Perkins' adaptation of the Aussie musical theater hit "Bran Nue Dae," then please proceed immediately to the nearest doctor to have your pulse checked. Because if the ol' ticker's still ticking, it's almost impossible not to be swept up by the exuberant fun of this singing, dancing, irony-laced ode to the repression, reeducation and resistance of Australia's indigenous tribal peoples circa 1969.
TRAVEL
February 20, 2005 | By Kaylene Johnson, Special to The Times
We arrived at the train station in the early-morning darkness of Alaska's deep winter. Moonlight glittered on newly fallen snow as passengers piled out of vehicles with their skis, snowboards, snowshoes and sleds. My 19-year-old son, Erik, and I, hauling nordic skis and a picnic cooler, loaded our gear into the baggage car and joined 400 other winter enthusiasts in making ourselves comfortable in the Alaska Railroad's coach cars. It was my second trip (but my son's first) on the annual ski train, an event chartered by the Nordic Ski Assn.
TRAVEL
August 11, 2002
What a surprise to see my Uncle Bud's Sourdough Roadhouse on the cover of the Travel section ("Finding Gold Rush Tales and Roadhouse Comforts on the Richardson Highway," July 28). Elstun "Bud" Lauesen owned it in the 1970s and 1980s. One of the lasting memories from my visit to the roadhouse was the "Caribou Clatters" radio message service, which was how they knew that I was arriving from Los Angeles and whether to meet me at the airport in Fairbanks or Valdez. BONNIE LAUESEN HODGE San Dimas
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2011 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
John Mosca, proprietor of a two-room roadhouse near New Orleans famed for its Italian-style garlicky shrimp, oysters, chicken and marinated crab dishes, has died. He was 86. Mosca died Wednesday at his home in suburban Harahan, said his daughter, Lisa Mosca. He had prostate cancer. His parents, Provino and Lisa Mosca, founded Mosca's restaurant in 1946 in the community of Avondale, about half an hour from downtown New Orleans on the west bank of the Mississippi River. They served platters heaped with food rather than individual plates.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Honestly, if you're not at least tempted to hum along with the cheeky refrain "There's nothing I would rather be, than to be an A-bo-rig-i-ne, and watch you take my precious land a-waaaaay" in Rachel Perkins' adaptation of the Aussie musical theater hit "Bran Nue Dae," then please proceed immediately to the nearest doctor to have your pulse checked. Because if the ol' ticker's still ticking, it's almost impossible not to be swept up by the exuberant fun of this singing, dancing, irony-laced ode to the repression, reeducation and resistance of Australia's indigenous tribal peoples circa 1969.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2009 | By Martha Groves
Patrick's Roadhouse, a shamrock-adorned institution on Entrada Drive near Pacific Coast Highway, is the kind of neighborhood joint that names omelets for its best customers -- and not just the famous ones like Arnold Schwarzenegger, whose scrambled eggs with the works was dubbed the Governator Special. Mark Fishman, a licensed acupuncturist and thrice-weekly regular, got to design a "Dr. Mark" concoction for the menu: eggs with sauteed spinach, mushrooms, onions, red bell peppers, Swiss cheese and house salsa on the side, assuming one knows to ask for the condiment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2007 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
The paint that covers Patrick's Roadhouse borders on the unappetizing -- think soggy yellow-green algae in a tidal pool. But Bill Fischler knew what he was doing when he chose the color in the early 1970s for his new eatery. The eye-assaulting hue helped turn an otherwise lackluster building into one of the most recognizable landmarks on Pacific Coast Highway, and, with Fischler as alchemist, green became golden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2006 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
It survived bootleggers, Prohibition, carousing movie stars, tattooed bikers, the rise of yuppie pool halls -- and a decades-long battle stemming from an anti-gay slur posted over the bar. Now, nearly 80 years after it opened, Barney's Beanery in West Hollywood remains a hip hangout, combining tourist glitz with biker cool. The joint, with its low ceilings and wood-beamed simplicity, evokes the days of Jean Harlow and W.C. Fields.
TRAVEL
February 20, 2005 | By Kaylene Johnson, Special to The Times
We arrived at the train station in the early-morning darkness of Alaska's deep winter. Moonlight glittered on newly fallen snow as passengers piled out of vehicles with their skis, snowboards, snowshoes and sleds. My 19-year-old son, Erik, and I, hauling nordic skis and a picnic cooler, loaded our gear into the baggage car and joined 400 other winter enthusiasts in making ourselves comfortable in the Alaska Railroad's coach cars. It was my second trip (but my son's first) on the annual ski train, an event chartered by the Nordic Ski Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
Based on early screenings for members of the press and exhibitors, MGM/UA's "Roadhouse" won't be wowing the critics with its cinematic artistry. As Barry Lorie, senior marketing veep at MGM/UA put it, "It's full of fist fights and dancing and lovemaking. I don't think the reviewers will be treating it too kindly." In fact, the pic, starring Patrick Swayze as a professional bouncer, was 86'd from a June piece in Premiere magazine that predicts the summer's Top 20 money-makers. A rep for MGM/UA admitted that "Roadhouse" was on that list--until the article's writers saw the pic. "I think they'll be sorry," said the publicist, who promised, "This movie will be a money-maker."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1998 | HEIDI SIEGMUND CUDA
Christmas came a wee bit early for Larry Pollack, the brains behind Dublin's Irish Whiskey Pub and Miyagi's--Sunset Strip venues that snap, crackle and pop with nightly excitement. Pollack, who's been angling to get his hands on the fire-damaged Thunder Roadhouse for some time now, clinched the deal earlier this week and we got the scoop-y fer ya.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2005 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
Cook's Corner has cleaned up its act. Well, sort of. The roadside tavern in the canyons of Orange County is still as rugged-looking as a World War II-era-mess-hall-turned-biker-bar should look. There are beer stains and sawdust on the floor. Bullhorns, U.S. flags and Christmas lights pass for decoration, and weathered picnic tables serve as the outdoor dining facilities. But some things have changed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2003 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
It may be the clearest sign yet of the changes brewing on Orange County's rural edge: Cook's Corner is for sale. The storied biker bar and greasy spoon at the doorstep of the Cleveland National Forest was placed on the market last week, in the wake of a series of county approvals for tract homes and a mini mall nearby. The price is $2.9 million, said Scott Hauck of Landmark Real Estate of Mission Viejo, who is handling the sale. Owner Frank DeLuna could not be reached for comment.
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