Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoadways
IN THE NEWS

Roadways

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Ruben Vives
Taking advantage of the dry and sunny weekend, crews with the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works were assessing damage caused by last week's pounding storms and were clearing roadways, underground storm drains and debris catch basins near recently burned areas. "When the sun comes out, we start work again," department spokesman Bob Spencer said Saturday. "We have a lot of road crews clearing out the roads of mud and debris. Flood-control people will be in the basins." Crews were inspecting 1,000 miles of underground storm drains and 500 miles of flood-control channels.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2014 | By Christopher Megerian, Kate Mather and Melanie Mason
ORLAND, Calif. -- The National Transportation Safety Board said some of the victims killed in Thursday's Northern California tour bus crash were thrown from the coach when a FedEx truck slammed into it. The search for the cause of the crash continued as the names of more victims, many high school students from the Los Angeles area going on a college tour, were released. "We're going to look at whether seat belts might have kept them in place and whether that would have made a difference," NTSB board member Mark Rosekind said Saturday.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
October 27, 2009 | Tina Susman
The narrow lanes weave through the forest, past timber guardrails, low-slung bridges with stone facades and trees whose crimson leaves glisten in the fall sun. But take a closer look. Those log guardrails hide steel reinforcements. And some of the charming bridges have been swapped out for modern, sharp-edged models. On second thought, don't take a closer look; you might find yourself wrapped around one of those magnificent trees. The Merritt Parkway, known to many Americans as a speed trap for David Letterman, for 69 years has coursed through southwestern Connecticut, linking what are now some of its toniest suburbs to New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
All lanes of the 105 Freeway in Paramount have been closed in both directions as authorities respond to a man threatening to jump off an overcrossing. [Updated at 10:03 p.m.: All lanes have reopened, according to the California Highway Patrol. ] A SigAlert was issued around 6:30 p.m, California Highway Patrol Officer Monica Posada said. She added that it was not clear if transition roads to the nearby  710 Freeway are closed. She also said she did not know where traffic was being diverted.
SCIENCE
October 2, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Nearly one-fifth of the U.S. population lives near a high-volume road where pollution levels are typically elevated from vehicle exhaust, a new study says. The analysis found 60 million people living within about one-third of a mile from a busy road. In California, 40% of the population lives that close to traffic, the highest of any state. “It's a surprisingly large proportion of the population,” said Gregory Rowangould, a professor of engineering at the University of New Mexico who used U.S. Census and Department of Transportation traffic data to conduct the nationwide tally.
NEWS
November 26, 1992
Two-thirds of the way up the mountain from Brand Park, there used to stand a solitary oak tree, the only one along the motorway leading to the top. I used it as a goal in walks and mountain bike rides. I often sat under it and enjoyed its presence. A dozen years ago, the Los Angeles County fire chief, in his infinite wisdom about how to protect everybody from the threat of fire, decided the one-lane mountain roads, including the Mt. Wilson Toll Road and the Brand Park Motorway among many others--roads built by pick and shovel, mostly, on steep side slopes--should be widened out to accommodate fire trucks and to allow passing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1991
Re "Judge's Ruling Sidetracks San Joaquin Hills Tollway" (Oct. 24): I've lived in Orange County for almost 40 years. During that time, developers' avarice and "cooperative" civic leaders have generated congestion of our land and roadways. Travel outside our neighborhoods is almost impossible. Smog lays along our coast spoiling the sea and the air. More smog from another freeway is just what we don't need. Perhaps rapid transit? KAREN M. PHELPS South Laguna
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2005
Re Shawn Hubler's "New Yorkers: How to Get a Life Out Here" [May 1]: I moved out here from New York three months ago. I grew up on Long Island and lived in Manhattan for 10 years so I know the city and the suburbs. Let's face it, L.A. is a civic engineering failure. The freeways? Yes, they are free, but you pay a price. No numbered exits?! Are you kidding me? There is no simpler, more effective system. Wherever you are, you know how to get where you're going. Take the numbers up or down!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1996
Economist William Vickrey [who died suddenly Friday] became a familiar name to millions of Americans last week when he, along with British economist James Mirrlees, was awarded the 1996 Nobel Prize in economics (Oct. 9). Unbeknownst to most, however, is the daily relief that Vickrey's work is likely to bring to millions of commuters within the next several years. Vickrey was a lone voice in the 1950s when he pioneered the idea of "congestion pricing" to charge motorists more to use roadways during rush hours and less during other times of the day. The effect is to encourage people to use roadways as efficiently as possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1992
If the California Air Resources Board seriously believes that fewer pollutants are emitted at 20 to 35 m.p.h. ("Efforts to Reduce Road Congestion May Create Smog," Aug. 30), they should come down from their ivory tower and spend a grueling rush hour with the mass of frustrated commuters. They would find that 20 to 35 m.p.h. is seldom the steady speed modeled on their computer, but rather an average of hitting the gas, then slamming on the brakes--hardly conducive to efficient travel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By KTLA
A man who authorities say was driving one of two vehicles that struck a 14-year-old girl in Santa Ana before driving off is due in court Wednesday to face felony hit-and-run charges. Police said Adan Camacho, 32, was behind the wheel of a truck that struck the unidentified girl when she ran into traffic against the light at about 4:10 p.m. Monday on her way to Santa Ana College at 17th and Bristol streets. Police said they are continuing to search for the driver of a second car, possibly a black Cadillac, that struck the girl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Jason Wells
A winter storm that was only expected to slightly dampen the L.A. Basin pelted the Bay Area on Thursday, causing minor flooding and traffic woes for commuters. A flood watch was also issued for Monterey, Santa Benito, Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties as the storm system moved across California, creating the potential for heavy rainfall to cause small creeks and streams to breach their banks. Excess runoff could also create "ponding" in urban areas, the National Weather Service said.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Cars of the future will know when they're about to get hit - and how to speak up about it. U.S. auto safety regulators on Monday took the first steps toward mandating that automakers build cars that talk to one another. They would speak in short-range radio signals, trading messages that would prevent accidents on a broad scale, according to the Transportation Department. The most advanced cars today can already spot trouble ahead. They use sensors to detect cars or fixed objects ahead, and alert drivers - or, in some cases, even slam on the brakes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Lee Romney
It cost more than $800 million to build, spans 340,000 square feet and will employ 2,000 full-time workers. It also carved a deep rift in Sonoma County's political landscape over the past decade, spurring legal action, acrimony and even some death threats. But on Tuesday morning, the Graton Resort & Casino in Rohnert Park opened its doors an hour ahead of schedule to a screaming crowd of thousands. With that, one of the largest casinos in the state -- and among the largest tribal gaming operations in the nation -- kicked into gear, swamping roadways as thousands of Bay Area motorists headed north.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
A 21-year-old man was arrested Friday in connection with the death of a woman who Santa Ana detectives believe may have been pushed from a truck on Halloween night. Francisco Montano was booked into Santa Ana jail on suspicion of felony hit-and-run, "for now, pending further investigation," the Santa Ana Police Department said in a statement. On Thursday, officers responded about 8 p.m. to the 1600 block of West Edinger Avenue, where they reported finding a young girl and the woman, with major injuries, on the roadway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores
Santa Ana police are seeking the public's help in identifying a young child who was found in the road lying next to a woman who they believe may have been pushed out of a truck Thursday night. The unidentified woman, described as a Latina between 20 and 30 years old, died from her injuries at a local hospital. The baby girl, believed to be 10 months to 1½ years old, remains in stable condition. The Santa Ana Police Department identified the woman as the child's mother. Officers responded at about 8 p.m. to the 1600 block of West Edinger Avenue, where they reported finding the woman with major injuries and a young girl in the roadway.
OPINION
January 31, 1999
Thank you for "Crumbling Sidewalks, Roads Mean Costly Suits" (Jan. 24). Someday a smart attorney will put together a class-action lawsuit that may get the attention of our "head-in-the-sand council" (especially liked the "let's throw money at the squeaky wheels and maybe the whole problem will go away" attitude). Even Mr. Magoo could see the potential lawsuits just waiting to happen against our city. Road rage seems to be a new phenomenon. I would like to suggest that roadways that are beginning to resemble Third World back alleys and two-mile-long daily gridlocks on major roadways, like Sunset Boulevard west of the 405, could be contributing factors.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
DENVER -- A late-season snow storm swept across Colorado's front range and began making its way onto the eastern plains and Midwest on Saturday. The storm, which was causing havoc on the roadways, dropped about 8 to 12 inches of snow in Denver, Kyle Fredin, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Boulder, said in a telephone interview. The snow led to multiple accidents and roadway closures. In one area, south of Fort Collins, between 20 and 50 vehicles had crashed or gone off the roadway, according to the Colorado State Patrol.
SCIENCE
October 2, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Nearly one-fifth of the U.S. population lives near a high-volume road where pollution levels are typically elevated from vehicle exhaust, a new study says. The analysis found 60 million people living within about one-third of a mile from a busy road. In California, 40% of the population lives that close to traffic, the highest of any state. “It's a surprisingly large proportion of the population,” said Gregory Rowangould, a professor of engineering at the University of New Mexico who used U.S. Census and Department of Transportation traffic data to conduct the nationwide tally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Bryce Alderton
Laguna Beach Police closed Laguna Canyon Road for four hours Tuesday and returned to the scene of a previous fatal head-on auto collision between a Tesla and Honda Accord. Two men who were driving to work April 2 were killed there. Police said a Tesla outbound from Laguna Beach veered into oncoming traffic and hit a Honda Accord head on just before 7 a.m. that day. Alberto Casique-Salinas, 46, of Anaheim and Armando Garcia-Gonzales, 38, of Santa Ana, who were in the Accord, died at the scene, according to police.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|