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Roald Dahl

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NEWS
November 24, 1990 | From the Associated Press
Roald Dahl, author of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," "James and the Giant Peach" and other tales for children, died Friday, his agent said. He was 74. Dahl died at John Radcliffe Hospital, where he was admitted Nov. 12 with an undisclosed infection, according to his agent, Murray Pollinger. Dahl wrote nine books of short stories, three novels, 19 children's books, and numerous screenplays and scripts for television, including "Tales of the Unexpected."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2013 | By Patrick Pacheco
NEW YORK - Miss Agatha Trunchbull, headmistress of Crunchem Hall school, hates pigtails. They're good only to serve as handles by which she can toss a rebellious child into the air - a feat this one-time Olympic hammer-throwing champion shows off early in "Matilda," the new Broadway musical. Her motto - " Bambinatum est maggitum" (" Children are maggots") - is no joke. Even so, Miss Trunchbull, as severe as her chignon and as charming as Hannibal Lecter, is one of the funniest comic creations ever to grace a Broadway stage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | Kate Bernheimer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Storyteller The Authorized Biography of Roald Dahl Donald Sturrock Simon & Schuster: 658 pp., $30 I was sitting on an airplane with a copy of "Storyteller: The Authorized Biography of Roald Dahl" when an elegant woman in the seat next to me murmured, almost to herself, "I live just down the lane from his old cottage in Oxfordshire. " Turning to her with excitement I asked if she'd ever run into him. "Oh, no, no," she said with obvious amusement, as if the very suggestion was completely absurd.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
“Matilda: The Musical,” the stage incarnation of Roald Dahl's famed storybook, made its Broadway debut Thursday at the Shubert Theatre. The London import, minted by the Royal Shakespeare Company, follows a troubled girl genius whose gifts are lost on her idiotic parents and a tyrannical boarding school headmistress played by British actor Bertie Carvel in drag. The musical, with a book by Dennis Kelly and a score by Australian comedian and composer Tim Minchin, features a kid-centric cast, including four girls who share the title (and telekinetic)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1996 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Each year it happens in Hollywood: An author's works become hot property as the industry rushes to adapt them for film. Two years ago, there was an unseemly scramble to make movies based on the novels of Edith Wharton ("The Age of Innocence," "Ethan Frome"). Since then, Jane Austen ("Sense and Sensibility," "Persuasion") has been in vogue. And recent months have seen no fewer than 10 film ventures based on Shakespeare plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2008 | Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- It seems somehow appropriate that a mischievous dog helped stop Roald Dahl's granddaughter from making a big writing mistake. It happened when model turned author Sophie Dahl was composing her first full-length novel in longhand, on a legal pad. She thought it was more romantic that way -- and the tone matched. "It was so childish, but I found I was writing as I imagined a book should sound. I had this sort of rather grand voice. It wasn't true," she says. "It was bloody awful."
FOOD
February 27, 1992 | ANNE MENDELSON
If there's anything I can't stand, it's a celebrity cookbook, especially one filled with color photographs of the food and the Great Person. That's why the pleasantness of "Memories With Food at Gipsy House" comes as a complete surprise. It's one of those oddities that occasionally waltz into print, an improbably successful meshing of elements that sound quite feeble in the abstract.
BOOKS
April 17, 1994 | RICHARD EDER
"Your threat to leave Knopf after this current contract is fulfilled leaves us far from intimidated," Robert Gottlieb wrote Roald Dahl in 1980, after a long association that saw "James and the Giant Peach" and "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" become two of the best-loved and best-selling children's books in history. "You've managed to make the entire experience of publishing you unappealing for all of us. . . ."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1996 | John Clark, John Clark is a freelance writer based in Los Angeles
A few blocks south of Market Street is a warehouse where time stands still--or nearly so. To gain entry, a visitor must step over Herve Villechaize's handprints on the sidewalk and press an intercom button. A cheery voice says, "Giant peach!" After the magic words are spoken, the door opens, and inside is a Ping-Pong table, a flight of stairs and a passageway. To find the nearly timeless place, follow the passageway until it runs into a corridor lined with black dropcloths.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | ELAINE KENDALL
Written just after World War II, when Roald Dahl was a stripling of 30 living in a rural Buckinghamshire village, the stories in "Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life" show both the quaintness absent in latter-day Dahl and the beginnings of the macabre humor so marked in his mature work. While the quaintness is the inadvertent result of time and progress, the quirkiness seems deliberate, giving the pastoral incidents and settings a sawtooth ridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2012 | By Julie Makinen
When “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” was released in 1971, director Mel Stuart had no inkling that the film would go on to be a beloved classic. The director, who died Thursday at 83, faced some scathing initial reviews for his adaptation of Roald Dahl's children's book "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. " Daily Variety called Gene Wilder's Wonka "cynical and sadistic" (though Wilder did receive a Golden Globe nomination for best lead actor in a musical/comedy for his performance)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | Kate Bernheimer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Storyteller The Authorized Biography of Roald Dahl Donald Sturrock Simon & Schuster: 658 pp., $30 I was sitting on an airplane with a copy of "Storyteller: The Authorized Biography of Roald Dahl" when an elegant woman in the seat next to me murmured, almost to herself, "I live just down the lane from his old cottage in Oxfordshire. " Turning to her with excitement I asked if she'd ever run into him. "Oh, no, no," she said with obvious amusement, as if the very suggestion was completely absurd.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2010 | By James C. Taylor, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— Roald Dahl's "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" has always yearned to burst into song. The 1964 novel features a healthy serving of Oompa-Loompa verse ditties, and both of its film adaptations boast numbers by notable songwriters: Anthony Newley and Leslie Bricusse in the 1971 movie and Danny Elfman in the 2005 Tim Burton-Johnny Depp blockbuster. Now it's become clear that with these songs, Dahl's characters were just warming up. Last month rumors circulated that Sam Mendes is planning to direct a Broadway musical of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" with music and lyrics by the "Hairspray" team of Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
To be a film critic at the end of August is to be a high diver poised at the end of the board. Behind you is the overheated cacophony of the hectic summer months, ahead is the cool comfort of theaters filled with the fall's smart and sophisticated offerings. Or so it's tempting to think. But what if the fall films, for all their promise, let us down? (It's happened before.) And what if movies from those earlier months turn out to be some of the best we'll see all year? It's in that spirit that some of the best of 2009 so far have been selected for your consideration.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009
"The Ersatz Elevator" Lemony Snicket This is an installment in a sad series about three children whose parents died in a fire. These children are the Baudelaires. Their parents leave behind a fortune and a greedy man named Olaf is trying to steal the fortune. When the children had previous guardians, Olaf murdered them. The kids acquire new guardians. Their names are Esme and Jerome Squalor. The Baudelaires can't believe how many stairs there are in the Squalors' penthouse apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2008
"Journey to the Center of the Earth" Jules Verne This wonderful adventure is filled with eye-opening experiences. A great professor finds a book by an author whose books were supposedly all burned. It takes the professor and his nephew days to decode the ancient writings. The writings state that there is a way to journey to the center of the earth. The determined professor wants to go there in spite of his nephew's pleadings not to go. When they are underneath the ground they encounter many dangers.
BOOKS
May 1, 1988
Please let Mary Dryden, who reviewed Patricia Neal's autobiography, "As I am" (Book Review, April 17), know that Roald Dahl is not a Norwegian writer; he is British, " . . . was born in Wales of Norwegian parents and lives in England . . ." to quote from "The Best of Roald Dahl." JANET R. GOFF CARDIFF, CALIF.
BOOKS
June 12, 1994
In his review of Jeremy Treglown's biography of Roald Dahl (Book Review, April 17), Richard Eder writes, "As a bachelor in Washington, D.C., (Dahl) painted the genitals of the rhinoceroses on the Q Street bridge." As someone whose in-laws live less than a hundred yards from that bridge, I don't know whether the mistake was a misperception by an overstimulated Dahl, or an error by his biographer, but I do know that those animals on the Q Street bridge are bison--and indeed, many Georgetown residents refer to the structure affectionately as "the Buffalo Bridge."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2008 | Mark Kennedy, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- It seems somehow appropriate that a mischievous dog helped stop Roald Dahl's granddaughter from making a big writing mistake. It happened when model turned author Sophie Dahl was composing her first full-length novel in longhand, on a legal pad. She thought it was more romantic that way -- and the tone matched. "It was so childish, but I found I was writing as I imagined a book should sound. I had this sort of rather grand voice. It wasn't true," she says. "It was bloody awful."
TRAVEL
July 3, 2005 | Jane Engle
Air travelers are getting new rules regarding lighters on aircraft -- again. The U.S. Department of Transportation issued a ruling June 22 allowing fuel-filled Zippo lighters in checked bags aboard airplanes if they are placed inside a special container approved by the DOT. The ruling applies only to Zippo brand lighters and a special plastic box being manufactured for the company. Zippo officials said the box, costing $12.95, was expected to be available later this month. The U.S.
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