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Roald Sagdeyev

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NEWS
March 28, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Are you two crazy ?" asked the nonplussed Moscow journalist. That simple question summed up world reaction to the Feb. 9 marriage between a granddaughter of a Cold War President and a top Soviet space scientist who advises Kremlin leaders. Five weeks after the ceremony, sitting in the suburban Washington, D.C., office they share, newlyweds Susan Eisenhower and Roald Sagdeyev can recall that interview and laugh out loud.
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OPINION
August 25, 1991 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a reporter for The Times. He interviewed Roald Sagdeyev by telephone from his office at the University of Maryland
It was in October, 1988, midway in the history of Soviet perestroika , that Roald Sagdeyev sat alone in the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R. and cast the sole vote in opposition to legislation authorizing the formation of new paramilitary forces. Those same units would later be used in violent clashes with civilians in Soviet Georgia and Lithuania. Soviet President Mikhail S.
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NEWS
February 10, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago it would have been too preposterous an idea for any but the most far-fetched of romantic novels: The granddaughter of a former American President marrying a top Soviet space scientist and friend of the country's Communist Party chief. But the world has been turned on its head since then, and Friday, an idea too outlandish for fiction became fact. Susan Eisenhower, 38, granddaughter of the late Dwight D. Eisenhower, married Roald Z.
NEWS
March 28, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Are you two crazy ?" asked the nonplussed Moscow journalist. That simple question summed up world reaction to the Feb. 9 marriage between a granddaughter of a Cold War President and a top Soviet space scientist who advises Kremlin leaders. Five weeks after the ceremony, sitting in the suburban Washington, D.C., office they share, newlyweds Susan Eisenhower and Roald Sagdeyev can recall that interview and laugh out loud.
OPINION
August 25, 1991 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a reporter for The Times. He interviewed Roald Sagdeyev by telephone from his office at the University of Maryland
It was in October, 1988, midway in the history of Soviet perestroika , that Roald Sagdeyev sat alone in the Supreme Soviet of the U.S.S.R. and cast the sole vote in opposition to legislation authorizing the formation of new paramilitary forces. Those same units would later be used in violent clashes with civilians in Soviet Georgia and Lithuania. Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Reuters
It was a union filled with symbolism--the granddaughter of a former U.S. President marrying a prominent Soviet scientist with a traditional ceremony and a reception that reeked of capitalism. But when it came time today to cut an enormous wedding cake, Susan Eisenhower and Roald Sagdeyev did what any couple would do. They smiled and kissed and then blushed in front of about 100 smiling American and Soviet guests.
NEWS
October 13, 1988
The Soviet Union has abandoned attempts to revive the crippled Phobos 1 unmanned probe to Mars that was shut down by a computer programming error about two months into its mission, the weekly magazine Moscow News reported. Roald Sagdeyev, head of the Institute of Space Research responsible for Phobos 1 and its virtual twin, Phobos 2, told the magazine that the accidental omission of a single character in the program led to the failure.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | From Reuters
Top Soviet scientists on Thursday angrily rejected accusations published by the Soviet press last year that the Pentagon manufactured the deadly AIDS virus as part of a U.S. biological warfare program. "Not a single serious scientist has even hinted that AIDS was artificially manufactured," space expert Roald D. Sagdeyev of the Soviet Academy of Sciences told a news conference. "The academy has never had anything to do with such accusations," he said. Last year, the then-U.S.
NEWS
October 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Federal agents said Friday that more arrests may be made in an alleged plot to sell the Soviet Union plans for a U.S. super-computer capable of tracking submarines and detecting incoming missiles. The plot, which allegedly involved the Soviet's top space official, was broken up when agents arrested three men after recovering plans for a billion-computations-per-second computer developed by Sunnyvale-based Saxpy Computer Corp.
NEWS
March 14, 1986 | LEE DYE, Times Staff Writer
It turns out that a dirty snowball that has returned to Earth every 76 years, sometimes lighting up the heavens so starkly that it was viewed as a harbinger of doom and destruction, does indeed have a black heart. Scientists with experiments aboard the Giotto spacecraft reported today that the nucleus of Halley's comet is twice as large as expected, but "black as coal" on the surface.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago it would have been too preposterous an idea for any but the most far-fetched of romantic novels: The granddaughter of a former American President marrying a top Soviet space scientist and friend of the country's Communist Party chief. But the world has been turned on its head since then, and Friday, an idea too outlandish for fiction became fact. Susan Eisenhower, 38, granddaughter of the late Dwight D. Eisenhower, married Roald Z.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | From Reuters
It was a union filled with symbolism--the granddaughter of a former U.S. President marrying a prominent Soviet scientist with a traditional ceremony and a reception that reeked of capitalism. But when it came time today to cut an enormous wedding cake, Susan Eisenhower and Roald Sagdeyev did what any couple would do. They smiled and kissed and then blushed in front of about 100 smiling American and Soviet guests.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
A European spacecraft is speeding toward an encounter with Halley's Comet late today that will be so close that the craft may be destroyed in the process. Officials with the European Space Operations Center here made the final course adjustmenTTuesday night that will send the craft, Giotto, within about 300 miles of the nucleus of the comet.
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