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Roast Chicken

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NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila
For years I faithfully made Marcella Hazan's roast chicken, which basically involved roasting the bird with a lemon in its cavity. But once I tried Simon Hopkinson's recipe from his quite wonderful cookbook “Roast Chicken and Other Stories,” there was no going back. I absolutely crave this chicken and could eat it once a week, no problem. What's the difference? Well, butter. Hopkinson was famously the chef of Sir Terence Conran's restaurant Bibendum in London and since those heady days has gone on to write a regular column for the Telegraph in London.
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FOOD
March 20, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
This is a great example of Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Oregon in an outstanding vintage. The grapes come from the famous Shea Vineyard in Yamhill County. The result is a Pinot with lovely dark-toned fruit, a pretty nose of rose petals and cherries, and a smooth, silky texture. And you don't need to know a thing about wine or Pinot Noir to appreciate its beauty. It's great with sautéed calf's liver, fried quail, a roast chicken or a pot pie. Region: Willamette Valley, Oregon Price: $33 to $50 Style: Rich and full-bodied What it goes with: Calf's liver, quail, roast chicken, pot pie Where to find it: BestWinesOnline (888)
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NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Restaurant Critic
The other day, a friend who had moved to Santa Fe was in town so I asked him over to dinner. It was a weeknight and I didn't have a whole lot of time to fuss in the kitchen, and also, because it just seemed like that kind of day, I made a roast chicken. My standby used to be Marcella Hazan's method, just stick a whole lemon inside and let it lightly perfume the bird. But lately I've been making it Simon Hopkinson's way, from the British chef and food writer's book “Roast Chicken and Other Stories.” It has to be among the best roast chickens I've ever tasted.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Here's a scenario: You've got a hankering for roast chicken, either from your favorite takeout, a restaurant, or from your own oven. Mine would be Judy Rodger's justly famous bird with bread and arugula salad from her masterful “The Zuni Cafe Cookbook: A Compendium of Recipes and Cooking Lessons from San Francisco's Beloved Restaurant.” The beautiful thing about roast chicken is that it pairs with both red and white wines. Nothing too intense and certainly no reds with massive tannins.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Here's a scenario: You've got a hankering for roast chicken, either from your favorite takeout, a restaurant, or from your own oven. Mine would be Judy Rodger's justly famous bird with bread and arugula salad from her masterful “The Zuni Cafe Cookbook: A Compendium of Recipes and Cooking Lessons from San Francisco's Beloved Restaurant.” The beautiful thing about roast chicken is that it pairs with both red and white wines. Nothing too intense and certainly no reds with massive tannins.
FOOD
October 25, 1990 | ROSE DOSTI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DEAR SOS: We have been going to Les Freres Taix French restaurant in Los Angeles for 30 years and especially enjoy their roast chicken. Is it possible to obtain a recipe? --HIRSCH DEAR HIRSCH: The smell of roast chicken and Bordelaise sauce will make you think you are in a cozy side-street bistro in Paris. Note the recipe uses canola oil, a highly monounsaturated oil, considered healthful.
FOOD
September 6, 2006
Total time: 45 minutes Servings: 4 Note: From "The Bon Appetit Cookbook" by Barbara Fairchild. For a variation, use a mixture of golden and red cherry tomatoes. Serve with crusty bread to soak up the sauce. 24 ounces whole cherry tomatoes (about 4 cups), stemmed 1/4 cup olive oil 5 garlic cloves, pressed 1 1/4 teaspoons dried crushed red pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh marjoram, divided 4 bone-in chicken breasts (10 to 12 ounces each) Salt and freshly ground pepper 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1996 | MAX JACOBSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A decade ago, there was just about no place in this town to get a nice piece of roast chicken. Today, restaurants specializing in roast chicken are as commonplace as personal trainers with their own Web pages. Koo Koo Roo, the wildly popular Zankou Chicken and national chains such as Boston Market and Kenny Rogers Roasters have brought us from a roast chicken-less abyss to a golden shore of cluck.
FOOD
November 17, 2011
This is the bird everyone has been talking about. Inspired by the famous roast chicken by Judy Rodgers, chef at San Francisco's beloved Zuni Café, it's as simple as can be. No more pale, under-seasoned birds. No more finding room in the refrigerator for huge pails of brine. Salt it, bag it and forget it (well, give it a rub once a day just to be sure the salt is evenly distributed). The resulting turkey is moist, gloriously browned and perfectly seasoned all the way to the bone. Begin the brining the Sunday evening before Thanksgiving and give it several hours in the refrigerator uncovered at the end to thoroughly dry the skin.
FOOD
November 15, 1990 | MARION CUNNINGHAM
A meal should feed us in a satisfying way that makes us feel restored and replete when leaving the table. Restaurants almost never make me feel that way. I like going out to eat, but I never go to a restaurant expecting to be pleasantly fed. Restaurants are fascinating, and sitting in them is like being in someone's dream. Once in a while the food is wonderful and it is a thrill--but it is always unexpected. And even then, there is no substitute for a home-cooked meal.
TRAVEL
January 4, 2014 | Los Angeles Times
We were looking for a restaurant within walking distance of the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco and found a great spot that even our local friends didn't know about. We all raved about its empanadas, roasted chicken and sangria. Its ceviche was the best I have had outside of Peru. The servers made us all feel like regulars. Call for reservations if more than two, because there are only a few large tables and a few seats at the lovely bar. La Fusion, 475 Pine St., (415) 781-0894, http://www.lafusion-sf.com D. Kay Renick Ventura
FOOD
November 23, 2013 | S. Irene Virbila
This is an elegant Napa Valley Chardonnay from Chateau Montelena, very much still in the style that won the famous Paris Tasting of 1976 and launched California Chardonnay onto the world wine scene. Silky on the palate, the 2011 has aromas of pear, citrus and honeysuckle. A bright acidity and a discrete touch of oak give the ripe fruit flavors a lift. A wine to savor. This would be a great bottle to take to a holiday dinner with people who would appreciate its finesse. It shows best with shellfish or fish in sauce -- coquilles St. Jacques, lobster with drawn butter or Dungeness crab, but also a simple roast chicken.
FOOD
August 3, 2013
The Chianti region is large, and while the wines from the Classico region are the best known, for price and quality, look to the lesser-known Chianti Rufina, a small area in the northeastern corner of Chianti proper. Selvapiana is one of the best estates in Rufina, turning out first-rate Sangiovese-based reds. I've been buying its Chianti for years, keeping it on hand for pasta nights and grilled skirt steak or chops. A deep ruby in color, the 2010 Selvapiana tastes of bright cherries and plums, but a touch of earth gives it some weight.
FOOD
April 13, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
Funny how the chicken has become our most beloved bird. My neighbor is raising some exotic chicks, but even those of us who don't go to that extreme have our own favorite named chickens to buy - Rosie, Rocky, Mary or the more exotically named Jidori. Roast chicken is the go-to dish for every chef I can name. And chicken is a perennial favorite on most restaurant menus - fried, pan-fried, rotisserie-roasted, in tagine , salad, soup, pot pie, curry and every which way. Here are three of my favorite chicken dishes in L.A. Bouchon Bouchon may be famous for its lusty fried chicken, and that is one of the great fried chickens of the world, but my heart is firmly fixed on Thomas Keller's roast chicken grand-mère , which may be the prettiest chicken dish in L.A. It arrives tall and proud, the breast stacked on top of the leg and thigh, with dainty pearl onions, demure fingerling potatoes, button mushrooms and bacon lardons strewn around the plate in the bird's winter savory-infused juices.
NEWS
April 1, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Ever since I got Seattle chef John Sundstrom's cookbook and iPad app " Lark: Cooking against the Grain " (Community Supported Cookbooks, $50 for the book; $9.99 for the app), I've been cooking out of the book like crazy. For a Sunday supper, his mustard roasted chicken with drippings, potatoes and chard is easy as can be. Basically he mixes together equal parts Dijon mustard and whole grain mustard with minced shallot, thyme leaves, a glug of olive oil and a big splash of white wine.
FOOD
January 12, 2013 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
Meghan and Carter are getting married. Like so many friends of my daughter, they are bright, funny and, sometimes, almost preternaturally serious. A couple of weeks ago, they asked my wife if we would talk to them about how to stay married - and about how to cook. The first, I'll leave to Kathy; after almost 34 years, it's still a mystery to me. But the cooking part is right up my alley, and, even better, I figured it would give me a chance to try out some of the ideas I've been on a soapbox about for the last couple of years.
FOOD
November 15, 1990 | ABBY MANDEL
When it comes to good old-fashioned home cooking, nothing beats a whole roasted chicken. The flavor and texture of the bird are much better than when it is baked as individual parts. It's cheaper, too. A roasted chicken can be the anchor of the simplest family supper or of the most festive dinner party. It's the accompaniments that make the difference.
NEWS
December 10, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
Ooooh, the holiday season does bring out the cranky in some people, doesn't it? When our S. Irene Virbila wrote a blog post the other day about her new favorite roast chicken - from British chef Simon Hopkinson's “Roast Chicken and Other Stories” - some of the online commentary got a little hot. The issue is one of timing - Hopkinson (and Virbila) call for roasting the chicken for 40 to 60 minutes with the oven first on high heat at 475 degrees, finishing at 375 degrees. Someone calling himself “wordsmyythe” wrote: “I guarantee if you follow these directions exactly as stated, you'll have raw chicken on the inside.” And that was mild compared to the ironically named “decentdiscourse” who opined, “Where did they find a food writer who believes a whole chicken at 400 degrees will be ready for basting in 15 minutes and ready to eat less than an hour later?
FOOD
December 8, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times
  Always on the lookout for a juicy California Pinot, one with some character and grit, I think I've found it in the 2011 from August West. The label is a collaboration between Ed Kurtzman and growers Howard Graham and Gary Franscioni. The grapes - a tiny crop this year - came from the vineyards Rosella's, Sierra Mar and Sberanes. Tasting of black cherry, plums and earth, this latest vintage of Pinot Noir Santa Lucia Highlands, their fourth, has gorgeous fruit and ripe tannins.
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