Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRob Cohen
IN THE NEWS

Rob Cohen

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1990 | KARI GRANVILLE
A cop-buddy movie was not what producer Rob Cohen and his partner, director John Badham, had in mind in 1988, looking for their inaugural project as one of Hollywood's newest teams. The genre was overworked, they thought, and couldn't take much more spin beyond what it was then undergoing--stories about canines and cops ("K-9," "Turner and Hootch"). But there is always another twist, Cohen and Badham found, and they located it in a script called "The Hard Way."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Alex Cross isn't the kind of guy who should need a comeback. The hero in novelist James Patterson's book series, Cross is a formidable detective, an African American family man who uses his training as a psychologist to track down society's baddest seeds. But Friday's new movie about the crime fighter, "Alex Cross," could be his hardest case yet. Not only is it a test of actor Tyler Perry's appeal beyond his own brand of comedies, but also of director Rob Cohen ("The Fast and the Furious")
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1993
"Dragon" is bound to find its share of criticism; some Asian-Americans are already saying that it merely continues the martial arts stereotype. But "Dragon" steps beyond martial arts--it deals with the uncomfortable subjects of interracial marriage and racism in Hollywood without preaching. Bruce Lee is presented as a human being who goes after what he wants despite severe resistance, most of it because of his race. "Dragon" thus can be seen as a symbol of what so many Asian-Americans are up against, even today.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Josh Gajewski
Think "Top Gun" on Ritalin, think big special effects, think sexy cast. That's the formula Rob Cohen, director of past summer blockbusters "The Fast and the Furious" and "XXX," has conjured up for his next popcorn thriller, "Stealth." But Cohen warns: "It's not just mindless summer fun. We are at a place where technology is achieving a certain independence from us.... So, yes, ["Stealth"] has the feelings of speed and summer blockbuster, but it has some idea and heart."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989
Patrick Goldstein's "Hollywood Burning" (April 16), on the plight of blacks in Hollywood, asks whether it is racism or economics that keeps blacks out of the industry. I don't see how it could be economics when the majority of films with unknown black casts released in recent years have been quite successful, i.e., "The Color Purple," "A Soldier's Story," "Hollywood Shuffle" and "She's Gotta Have It." (Were there any films with black casts that weren't successful?) And when you consider "Coming to America," earning $100 million, in which the cast was mostly unknown except for Eddie Murphy, I don't know how economics can be blamed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990
In Kari Granville's article "A Couple of Cops, With a Twist" (Sept. 2), producer Rob Cohen and director John Badham found this wonderful screenplay, "The Hard Way." And actor Michael J. Fox loved the unique story and actor James Woods thought the idea was fabulous, and throughout the article we learned all about Rob's and John's and Michael's and James' feelings and thoughts about this fantastic screenplay. Only one thing was left out of the article: Never once did anyone mention the name of the person who wrote this wonderful, fabulous, unique screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Josh Gajewski
Think "Top Gun" on Ritalin, think big special effects, think sexy cast. That's the formula Rob Cohen, director of past summer blockbusters "The Fast and the Furious" and "XXX," has conjured up for his next popcorn thriller, "Stealth." But Cohen warns: "It's not just mindless summer fun. We are at a place where technology is achieving a certain independence from us.... So, yes, ["Stealth"] has the feelings of speed and summer blockbuster, but it has some idea and heart."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Director Rob Cohen will verbally joust with anyone who dismisses his new movie, "Dragonheart," as "a boy's movie."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the summer began, the entertainment media were awash in stories forecasting the season's big films by A-list directors such as Steven Spielberg, Tim Burton and Michael Bay. But who could have predicted that the summer box-office heat would be fueled by films made by a string of unsung directors such as Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson, Rob Cohen, Lawrence Guterman, Joe Johnston and Robert Luketic? Don't recognize their names?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
"Look, man, at the way this light is bouncing around the room--it's going to look soooo cool." The best comedy is fueled by anger, envy and inspiration, which is why Rob Cohen can do such a wicked impression of a hotshot commercial director. Framing a shot with his hands, Cohen waves his arms and amps up his voice, capturing the over-caffeinated bravado of a video whiz who's fallen in love with his every bad idea as he shoots his first feature film.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the summer began, the entertainment media were awash in stories forecasting the season's big films by A-list directors such as Steven Spielberg, Tim Burton and Michael Bay. But who could have predicted that the summer box-office heat would be fueled by films made by a string of unsung directors such as Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson, Rob Cohen, Lawrence Guterman, Joe Johnston and Robert Luketic? Don't recognize their names?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Cohen's "The Fast and the Furious" hurtles us into the ultra-high-speed world of L.A. street racing. It's a world of midnight runs on empty city streets, where imported muscle cars can reach speeds as high as 160 mph in races that yield the winner a $10,000 payoff. It's an exciting, high-risk existence that breeds both camaraderie and intense rivalry. This is an action picture that's surprising in the complexity of its key characters and portents of tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2001 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
"Look, man, at the way this light is bouncing around the room--it's going to look soooo cool." The best comedy is fueled by anger, envy and inspiration, which is why Rob Cohen can do such a wicked impression of a hotshot commercial director. Framing a shot with his hands, Cohen waves his arms and amps up his voice, capturing the over-caffeinated bravado of a video whiz who's fallen in love with his every bad idea as he shoots his first feature film.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1996 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Director Rob Cohen will verbally joust with anyone who dismisses his new movie, "Dragonheart," as "a boy's movie."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1993
"Dragon" is bound to find its share of criticism; some Asian-Americans are already saying that it merely continues the martial arts stereotype. But "Dragon" steps beyond martial arts--it deals with the uncomfortable subjects of interracial marriage and racism in Hollywood without preaching. Bruce Lee is presented as a human being who goes after what he wants despite severe resistance, most of it because of his race. "Dragon" thus can be seen as a symbol of what so many Asian-Americans are up against, even today.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990
In Kari Granville's article "A Couple of Cops, With a Twist" (Sept. 2), producer Rob Cohen and director John Badham found this wonderful screenplay, "The Hard Way." And actor Michael J. Fox loved the unique story and actor James Woods thought the idea was fabulous, and throughout the article we learned all about Rob's and John's and Michael's and James' feelings and thoughts about this fantastic screenplay. Only one thing was left out of the article: Never once did anyone mention the name of the person who wrote this wonderful, fabulous, unique screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Cohen's "The Fast and the Furious" hurtles us into the ultra-high-speed world of L.A. street racing. It's a world of midnight runs on empty city streets, where imported muscle cars can reach speeds as high as 160 mph in races that yield the winner a $10,000 payoff. It's an exciting, high-risk existence that breeds both camaraderie and intense rivalry. This is an action picture that's surprising in the complexity of its key characters and portents of tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Dr. Alex Cross isn't the kind of guy who should need a comeback. The hero in novelist James Patterson's book series, Cross is a formidable detective, an African American family man who uses his training as a psychologist to track down society's baddest seeds. But Friday's new movie about the crime fighter, "Alex Cross," could be his hardest case yet. Not only is it a test of actor Tyler Perry's appeal beyond his own brand of comedies, but also of director Rob Cohen ("The Fast and the Furious")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1990 | KARI GRANVILLE
A cop-buddy movie was not what producer Rob Cohen and his partner, director John Badham, had in mind in 1988, looking for their inaugural project as one of Hollywood's newest teams. The genre was overworked, they thought, and couldn't take much more spin beyond what it was then undergoing--stories about canines and cops ("K-9," "Turner and Hootch"). But there is always another twist, Cohen and Badham found, and they located it in a script called "The Hard Way."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989
Patrick Goldstein's "Hollywood Burning" (April 16), on the plight of blacks in Hollywood, asks whether it is racism or economics that keeps blacks out of the industry. I don't see how it could be economics when the majority of films with unknown black casts released in recent years have been quite successful, i.e., "The Color Purple," "A Soldier's Story," "Hollywood Shuffle" and "She's Gotta Have It." (Were there any films with black casts that weren't successful?) And when you consider "Coming to America," earning $100 million, in which the cast was mostly unknown except for Eddie Murphy, I don't know how economics can be blamed.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|