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Rob Halford

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As lead singer of veteran British heavy-metal band Judas Priest, Rob Halford is used to being photographed and signing autographs. But that's usually backstage at one of the group's head-banging concerts. For the past two weeks, Halford, 38, has been approached by fans in a place he never expected to be: the steps of the Washoe County Courthouse, where his band is being blamed in the deaths of two local youths.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2004 | Lina Lecaro, Special to The Times
You've got to hand it to the headbangers -- they're one dedicated bunch. Metal may no longer dominate the charts as it did a few years ago, but for its long-locked, devil-horn- and chest-flashing fans, it still rules the universe. This relentless enthusiasm has helped Ozzfest, which returned to the Hyundai Pavilion on Saturday, remain the most depraved and decibel drenched of the annual summer concert tours.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1987 | SHARON LIVETEN
* "PRIEST . . . LIVE," Judas Priest. Columbia. For years, Judas Priest was the standard by which heavy-metal bands were judged. They took the genre beyond mind-numbing rhythm and pointless guitar solos, adding melody, elegant guitar gymnastics and occasional humor. And since Priest was most exciting on stage, this double live album should be wonderful. But with few exceptions, "Priest . . . Live" sounds like a caricature of a heavy-metal band. Most of the fault lies with the flat production.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990
I would like to thank The Times for its article on our neonatal tortoise research at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Unfortunately, one statement, "The tortoises under study . . . eventually will be set free in the desert," does need correction. An early draft of our study plan (provided to The Times) did make reference to a now-abandoned reintroduction project. In fact, no captive tortoises will be released into natural habitats.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1986 | JON MATSUMOTO
"TURBO." Judas Priest. Columbia. For all its talk of rebellion and "Wild Nights, Hot and Crazy Days," Judas Priest is really a very conservative band. The veteran heavy-metal quintet simply doesn't change or challenge with its music or lyrics. Of course, the legions of young headbangers want nothing more than the assurance that each Priest album will be just like the last one: a fireball of no-wimps-allowed metal that sounds like a squadron of F-111's over Tripoli.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
If the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals expanded its concerns to include humans, there would have been pickets all around the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on Friday night. The volume was so painfully high during the three-hour heavy-metal concert that any thinking person in the first 40 rows should have been wearing ear plugs. But, of course, no one did. Part of the lure of the heavy-metal ritual is the sense of reckless abandon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2004 | Lina Lecaro, Special to The Times
You've got to hand it to the headbangers -- they're one dedicated bunch. Metal may no longer dominate the charts as it did a few years ago, but for its long-locked, devil-horn- and chest-flashing fans, it still rules the universe. This relentless enthusiasm has helped Ozzfest, which returned to the Hyundai Pavilion on Saturday, remain the most depraved and decibel drenched of the annual summer concert tours.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1990
I would like to thank The Times for its article on our neonatal tortoise research at California State University, Dominguez Hills. Unfortunately, one statement, "The tortoises under study . . . eventually will be set free in the desert," does need correction. An early draft of our study plan (provided to The Times) did make reference to a now-abandoned reintroduction project. In fact, no captive tortoises will be released into natural habitats.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1992 | RICHARD CROMELIN and New albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent).
* * Skid Row, "B-Side Ourselves," Atlantic. The Skids mark time with an EP of five of their favorite songs. The tenderness of Hendrix's "Little Wing" eludes Sebastian Bach entirely, and his Angst is out of place in the cartoonland of the Ramones' "Psycho Therapy."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press.
The Nevada Supreme Court has refused to let the heavy metal rock group Judas Priest out of a suit filed by the families of a youth who killed himself and another who attempted suicide after the pair listened to Priest albums nonstop for six hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As lead singer of veteran British heavy-metal band Judas Priest, Rob Halford is used to being photographed and signing autographs. But that's usually backstage at one of the group's head-banging concerts. For the past two weeks, Halford, 38, has been approached by fans in a place he never expected to be: the steps of the Washoe County Courthouse, where his band is being blamed in the deaths of two local youths.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1987 | SHARON LIVETEN
* "PRIEST . . . LIVE," Judas Priest. Columbia. For years, Judas Priest was the standard by which heavy-metal bands were judged. They took the genre beyond mind-numbing rhythm and pointless guitar solos, adding melody, elegant guitar gymnastics and occasional humor. And since Priest was most exciting on stage, this double live album should be wonderful. But with few exceptions, "Priest . . . Live" sounds like a caricature of a heavy-metal band. Most of the fault lies with the flat production.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
If the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals expanded its concerns to include humans, there would have been pickets all around the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on Friday night. The volume was so painfully high during the three-hour heavy-metal concert that any thinking person in the first 40 rows should have been wearing ear plugs. But, of course, no one did. Part of the lure of the heavy-metal ritual is the sense of reckless abandon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1986 | JON MATSUMOTO
"TURBO." Judas Priest. Columbia. For all its talk of rebellion and "Wild Nights, Hot and Crazy Days," Judas Priest is really a very conservative band. The veteran heavy-metal quintet simply doesn't change or challenge with its music or lyrics. Of course, the legions of young headbangers want nothing more than the assurance that each Priest album will be just like the last one: a fireball of no-wimps-allowed metal that sounds like a squadron of F-111's over Tripoli.
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