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Rob Jernigan

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BUSINESS
January 25, 2009 | Roger Vincent
The gig: Principal and co-managing director of the Santa Monica office of international architecture firm Gensler. An expert at translating elaborate designs into steel-and-concrete reality, Jernigan has been the hands-on "project principal" architect of such high-profile developments as the new 2000 Ave. of the Stars office building in Century City and the William Morris Agency headquarters under construction in Beverly Hills. Background: Jernigan's speech is a gumbo of Southern accents.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 2009 | Roger Vincent
The gig: Principal and co-managing director of the Santa Monica office of international architecture firm Gensler. An expert at translating elaborate designs into steel-and-concrete reality, Jernigan has been the hands-on "project principal" architect of such high-profile developments as the new 2000 Ave. of the Stars office building in Century City and the William Morris Agency headquarters under construction in Beverly Hills. Background: Jernigan's speech is a gumbo of Southern accents.
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BUSINESS
February 4, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
International architecture firm Gensler is expected to announce Friday that it will move its regional headquarters to downtown Los Angeles after operating for 20 years in Santa Monica. The move is viewed as a coup by Los Angeles officials, who are attempting to woo businesses to the city with a program that exempts new arrivals or start-ups from paying gross receipts taxes for three years. Gensler will occupy the upper two floors of a three-story building nestled between the twin 52-story skyscrapers of City National Plaza.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2010 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
The walls are closing in on white-collar workers ? their office environments are shrinking, propelled by new technology, a changing corporate culture and the age-old imperative to save a buck. Although personal workstations won't disappear, the sprawling warrens of cubicles and private offices that have defined the workplace for the last few decades are heading the way of Rolodexes and typewriters. The shift is of tectonic proportions, experts on the workplace say. In the 1970s, American corporations typically thought they needed 500 to 700 square feet per employee to build an effective office.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2001 | BRAD BERTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The aging ABC Entertainment Center--home of the Shubert Theatre--is archaic, unprofitable and doesn't justify renovation, said developers who plan to raze the Century City properties to make way for an office building. Officials at Trammell Crow Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2011 | Steve Lopez
In tough times, with stiff competition for scarce public money, how did a thriving multinational company manage to win more than $1 million in tax dollars to move its local headquarters from Santa Monica to downtown Los Angeles? It was a piece of cake, thanks to the help of Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and two people who'd like to be the next mayor - Councilwoman Jan Perry and former jobs czar Austin Beutner. The contract is now being completed by city officials, and the high-powered Gensler architecture firm - which designed L.A. Live and the proposed downtown football stadium and is a partner in the design of the new Broad Museum - is preparing to load up the trucks and move east on the 10 Freeway.
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