Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRob Kling
IN THE NEWS

Rob Kling

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Rob Kling, an author and educator regarded as the founding father of social informatics -- how computers influence social change -- has died. He was 58. Kling, who taught for 23 years at UC Irvine before moving to Indiana University seven years ago to head its new Center for Social Informatics, died May 15 in his home in Bloomington, Ind. His wife, Mitzi Lewison, said he died unexpectedly in his sleep of cardiovascular disease.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Rob Kling, an author and educator regarded as the founding father of social informatics -- how computers influence social change -- has died. He was 58. Kling, who taught for 23 years at UC Irvine before moving to Indiana University seven years ago to head its new Center for Social Informatics, died May 15 in his home in Bloomington, Ind. His wife, Mitzi Lewison, said he died unexpectedly in his sleep of cardiovascular disease.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 27, 1992 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Don't get Rob Kling wrong. The UC Irvine professor of computer science loves his computer. But he also thinks society's love affair with the "computer revolution" has masked a true understanding of the effects of computers, both negative and positive, on modern society. Kling co-edited a collection of essays on the controversial aspects of computers aptly entitled "Computerization and Controversy." The book is being used as a textbook in about 40 colleges around the country.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1992 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
Don't get Rob Kling wrong. The UC Irvine professor of computer science loves his computer. But he also thinks society's love affair with the "computer revolution" has masked a true understanding of the effects of computers, both negative and positive, on modern society. Kling co-edited a collection of essays on the controversial aspects of computers aptly entitled "Computerization and Controversy." The book is being used as a textbook in about 40 colleges around the country.
BOOKS
August 25, 1991 | Alex Raksin
POSTSUBURBAN CALIFORNIA: The Transformation of Orange County Since World War II, edited by Rob Kling, Spencer Olin and Mark Poster (University of California: $34.95; 303 pp.) . Inhabiting that sensible middle ground between chamber-of-commerce celebration and pugnacious revisionism (polarities our regional histories have too often gravitated toward), this is a winning collection of essays about a county many believe to be paradigmatic of America's suburban future.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1990 | Dean Takahashi, Times staff writer
UCI Researchers Awarded Grant: The National Science Foundation has awarded a team of UC Irvine researchers a $450,000 grant to study how computers can be used effectively in manufacturing. Co-directors of the study are Kenneth Kraemer, a professor of management, and Rob Kling, a professor of information and computer science management. The UCI project will include case studies on how computers are coordinated at four manufacturing firms.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY and JANICE L. JONES / Los Angeles Times
1870--James Irvine buys out his partners for $150,000 and becomes sole owner of the sprawling Irvine Ranch. 1894--James Irvine's son, also named James, incorporates the ranch as the Irvine Co., beginning the transition from grazing to farming. 1897--106-acre Irvine Park donated to the county by James Irvine Jr. 1899--First school built on Irvine Ranch. 1906--James Irvine Jr. relocates his family from earthquake-shattered San Francisco to the Irvine Ranch. 1914--Town of Myford renamed Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1988 | HERBERT J. VIDA
Hilary Buff, 17, of Anaheim, an active youth leader at Anaheim's Temple Beth Emet and a Loara High School senior, is the first female student to be elected international president of the United Synagogue of America Youth Program. The group, organized nearly half a century ago, is made up of 25,000 Conservative Jewish teen-agers from the United States, Canada, Israel and England.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1994 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the new millennium, Orange County residents will live in the electronic neighborhoods of cyberspace. Think of it as a heaven for computer nerds and couch potatoes--or rather mouse potatoes. The county is likely to be divided like a patchwork quilt, with phone companies, cable- and satellite-TV broadcasters and their wireless competitors all claiming a section. They will offer services far more interactive than anything available today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1986 | ANDY ROSE, Times Staff Writer
Instead of pen and paper, students at Santa Ana's future high school may write their compositions on word processors. Instead of going to libraries for research, they may use a computer data base. Santa Ana's fourth high school, expected to open for the 1988-89 school year, will be unlike any other in the state, district officials say, because every class, from English to mathematics, will make use of high technology.
BOOKS
August 25, 1991 | Alex Raksin
POSTSUBURBAN CALIFORNIA: The Transformation of Orange County Since World War II, edited by Rob Kling, Spencer Olin and Mark Poster (University of California: $34.95; 303 pp.) . Inhabiting that sensible middle ground between chamber-of-commerce celebration and pugnacious revisionism (polarities our regional histories have too often gravitated toward), this is a winning collection of essays about a county many believe to be paradigmatic of America's suburban future.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not surprising that developers George Argyros and Gary Hunt grabbed lead roles in negotiations that led to the proposed plan that the Orange County Board of Supervisors has embraced as a springboard to a fiscal recovery. After all, developers will be hard-pressed to build homes and shopping centers if potential home buyers fear that streets won't be built, schoolchildren won't be educated and police departments won't be able to keep officers on their beats.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the story of Orange County's financial collapse is written, historians may find it fitting that it was the region's high-powered developers who spearheaded the plan the Board of Supervisors endorsed this week as a springboard to recovery.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|