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Rob Manfred

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September 30, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
In a move that positions him as the favorite to become Major League Baseball's next commissioner, Rob Manfred was selected Monday as chief operating officer. Commissioner Bud Selig, who made the appointment, has not had a second-in-command since he fired Bob DuPuy in 2010. In a statement, MLB said Manfred would run the commissioner's office on a day-to-day basis while Selig focuses on big-picture issues "in preparing for his retirement. " Selig's retirement is effective in January 2015.
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SPORTS
September 30, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
In a move that positions him as the favorite to become Major League Baseball's next commissioner, Rob Manfred was selected Monday as chief operating officer. Commissioner Bud Selig, who made the appointment, has not had a second-in-command since he fired Bob DuPuy in 2010. In a statement, MLB said Manfred would run the commissioner's office on a day-to-day basis while Selig focuses on big-picture issues "in preparing for his retirement. " Selig's retirement is effective in January 2015.
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SPORTS
May 4, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
In unusually pointed remarks, a senior Major League Baseball official said Wednesday that the Dodgers have not cooperated with baseball's investigation into the team's finances and that team owner Frank McCourt is responsible for his own financial troubles. Rob Manfred, Commissioner Bud Selig's right-hand man, made his comments after yet another appeal by McCourt — this time through his lawyers — that baseball approve a lucrative television deal he says would allow the Dodgers to meet their obligations.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig confirmed Thursday that he plans to retire when his contract expires in January 2015. “It remains my great privilege to serve the game I have loved throughout my life," Selig said in a statement. "Baseball is the greatest game ever invented, and I look forward to continuing its extraordinary growth and addressing several significant issues during the remainder of my term. “I am grateful to the owners throughout Major League Baseball for their unwavering support and for allowing me to lead this great institution.  I thank our players, who give me unlimited enthusiasm about the future of our game.  Together we have taken this sport to new heights and have positioned our national pastime to thrive for generations to come.  Most of all, I would like to thank our fans, who are the heart and soul of our game.” Selig, 79, has served as commissioner since 1992.
SPORTS
August 21, 2008 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Baseball umpires and management signed an agreement Wednesday that will allow the sport to start using instant replay to help determine calls on the field. Major League Baseball officials have said they hoped to start using replay in August. Installation of equipment has been going on at ballparks. Replays will be limited to boundary calls, such as determining whether fly balls were fair or foul, or whether they went over fences. The deal was signed by management lawyer Dan Halem and World Umpires Assn.
SPORTS
February 23, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Ryan Braun, the reigning National League MVP, won his appeal of a positive test for a performance-enhancing drug and had his 50-game suspension overturned by an arbitrator. MLB and the players' union announced the decision Thursday. Rob Manfred, MLB's vice president for labor relations, was incensed at the ruling, saying in a statement: "Major League Baseball considers the obligations of the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program essential to the integrity of our game, our clubs and all of the players who take the field.
SPORTS
September 26, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig confirmed Thursday that he plans to retire when his contract expires in January 2015. “It remains my great privilege to serve the game I have loved throughout my life," Selig said in a statement. "Baseball is the greatest game ever invented, and I look forward to continuing its extraordinary growth and addressing several significant issues during the remainder of my term. “I am grateful to the owners throughout Major League Baseball for their unwavering support and for allowing me to lead this great institution.  I thank our players, who give me unlimited enthusiasm about the future of our game.  Together we have taken this sport to new heights and have positioned our national pastime to thrive for generations to come.  Most of all, I would like to thank our fans, who are the heart and soul of our game.” Selig, 79, has served as commissioner since 1992.
SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
The Dodgers currently do not have enough cash to meet payroll through this month, potentially accelerating a showdown between owner Frank McCourt and Major League Baseball. The cash shortage was confirmed Tuesday by two people familiar with the matter, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the possibility of McCourt filing suit against MLB. McCourt received a $30-million loan from Fox last month, which provided funding for the Dodgers' two April payrolls and is expected to carry them through the first May payroll.
SPORTS
January 2, 2011 | BILL SHAIKIN
Derek Jeter made his major league debut on May 29, 1995. Never has a labor squabble cost him a game. Dave Winfield made his debut on June 19, 1973, one year after a player strike and four months after an owners' lockout. In a Hall of Fame career that ended in 1995, Winfield endured four strikes and two lockouts that wiped a total of 1,650 games from the major league schedule. "If I'd have gotten those extra games, I might have had 500 home runs," said Winfield, whose career included 465 home runs.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013 | Staff and wire reports
For the city of San Jose, four years of waiting had been long enough. The city filed an antitrust lawsuit against Major League Baseball on Tuesday, not necessarily to win in court but to gain leverage for a settlement in which the Oakland Athletics could move to San Jose. "All we're looking for is for the A's to come to downtown San Jose," said Joe Cotchett , the attorney representing San Jose. The suit laid bare the hostility between the city of San Jose and the San Francisco Giants, the team that has insisted it would neither surrender nor sell its right to keep the A's out of San Jose.
SPORTS
June 18, 2013 | Staff and wire reports
For the city of San Jose, four years of waiting had been long enough. The city filed an antitrust lawsuit against Major League Baseball on Tuesday, not necessarily to win in court but to gain leverage for a settlement in which the Oakland Athletics could move to San Jose. "All we're looking for is for the A's to come to downtown San Jose," said Joe Cotchett , the attorney representing San Jose. The suit laid bare the hostility between the city of San Jose and the San Francisco Giants, the team that has insisted it would neither surrender nor sell its right to keep the A's out of San Jose.
SPORTS
July 9, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- If ever there was a time for righteous indignation, this was it. Matt Kemp could have - and arguably should have - been the National League most valuable player last year. Ryan Braun, who won the award, subsequently tested positive for a banned substance. Kemp could have declared himself the just and proper winner. Instead, in perhaps the single most significant step in his journey from a Dodgers problem child to a team spokesman and statesman, Kemp held fire.
SPORTS
February 23, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Ryan Braun, the reigning National League MVP, won his appeal of a positive test for a performance-enhancing drug and had his 50-game suspension overturned by an arbitrator. MLB and the players' union announced the decision Thursday. Rob Manfred, MLB's vice president for labor relations, was incensed at the ruling, saying in a statement: "Major League Baseball considers the obligations of the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program essential to the integrity of our game, our clubs and all of the players who take the field.
SPORTS
July 31, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Oakland Athletics owner Lew Wolff on Sunday called upon Frank McCourt to sell the Dodgers, becoming the first Major League Baseball owner to publicly urge McCourt to give up his fight to keep the team. Wolff also said he believes owners are united behind Commissioner Bud Selig, whose authority McCourt has challenged in Bankruptcy Court. Wolff, who lives in Los Angeles, said he decided to speak out after attorneys for the Dodgers' owner argued in a divorce court filing that whatever money McCourt might have taken out of the Dodgers was exceeded by the money Selig took out of MLB. "For anyone to seek to diminish Bud's accomplishments in order to rationalize their own actions is, in my opinion, ludicrous and hugely disingenuous," Wolff said.
SPORTS
May 4, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
In unusually pointed remarks, a senior Major League Baseball official said Wednesday that the Dodgers have not cooperated with baseball's investigation into the team's finances and that team owner Frank McCourt is responsible for his own financial troubles. Rob Manfred, Commissioner Bud Selig's right-hand man, made his comments after yet another appeal by McCourt — this time through his lawyers — that baseball approve a lucrative television deal he says would allow the Dodgers to meet their obligations.
SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
The Dodgers currently do not have enough cash to meet payroll through this month, potentially accelerating a showdown between owner Frank McCourt and Major League Baseball. The cash shortage was confirmed Tuesday by two people familiar with the matter, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the possibility of McCourt filing suit against MLB. McCourt received a $30-million loan from Fox last month, which provided funding for the Dodgers' two April payrolls and is expected to carry them through the first May payroll.
SPORTS
August 25, 2002 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baseball labor talks took a negative turn Saturday as management blasted players for making what it considered regressive proposals on the core economic issues of revenue sharing and a payroll tax, seemingly putting the sport on the brink of another work stoppage with a strike deadline in only five days. The gap widened between owners and the Major League Baseball Players Assn.
SPORTS
August 25, 2002 | Ross Newhan
As it was transpiring, amid the dueling conference calls, as Rob Manfred and Don Fehr were firing salvos at each other and listeners wondered if either of the negotiators had ever been in the same room, let alone across the same table from each other, the temptation was to shout, "Stop it children, go stand in the corner."
SPORTS
January 2, 2011 | BILL SHAIKIN
Derek Jeter made his major league debut on May 29, 1995. Never has a labor squabble cost him a game. Dave Winfield made his debut on June 19, 1973, one year after a player strike and four months after an owners' lockout. In a Hall of Fame career that ended in 1995, Winfield endured four strikes and two lockouts that wiped a total of 1,650 games from the major league schedule. "If I'd have gotten those extra games, I might have had 500 home runs," said Winfield, whose career included 465 home runs.
NEWS
January 1, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Derek Jeter made his major league debut on May 29, 1995. Never has a labor squabble cost him a game. FOR THE RECORD: Eight paragraphs were inadvertently dropped from the end of this article during the editing process. This updated online version presents the article in its entirety. Dave Winfield made his debut on June 19, 1973, one year after a player strike and four months after an owners' lockout. In a Hall of Fame career that ended in 1995, Winfield endured four strikes and two lockouts that wiped a total of 1,650 games from the major league schedule.
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