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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By David Ng
Call it a revival of a revival of a classic musical. Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall will team up again to bring back their popular 1998 Roundabout Theatre Company production of "Cabaret" for an opening next year set for April 24 at Studio 54 in New York. Alan Cumming, who played the Master of Ceremonies in the 1998 production, will return alongside Michelle Williams as Sally Bowles. (The late Natasha Richardson played Bowles in the 1998 version.) The 24-week engagement is scheduled to begin preview performances on March 21. The full cast will be announced at a later date.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By David Ng
Call it a revival of a revival of a classic musical. Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall will team up again to bring back their popular 1998 Roundabout Theatre Company production of "Cabaret" for an opening next year set for April 24 at Studio 54 in New York. Alan Cumming, who played the Master of Ceremonies in the 1998 production, will return alongside Michelle Williams as Sally Bowles. (The late Natasha Richardson played Bowles in the 1998 version.) The 24-week engagement is scheduled to begin preview performances on March 21. The full cast will be announced at a later date.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Ever since director Rob Marshall's "Chicago" won six Academy Awards earlier this year, Hollywood has been rife with speculation about when the filmmaker will step behind the cameras again. Now Marshall himself is beginning to ask the same question. For more than a month, Marshall and three studios -- Miramax, Sony and DreamWorks -- have been caught in a battle involving "Memoirs of a Geisha," the long-delayed, much-anticipated adaptation of Arthur S. Golden's bestselling novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Susan King, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom.
TCM Classic Film Festival announced Wednesday that Burt Reynolds and Malcolm McDowell have been added to the roster at the four-day event, which takes place April 25-28 in Hollywood. Reynolds and director John Boorman will join previously announced Jon Voight for a screening of the 1972 classic "Deliverance," while McDowell will discuss James Cagney's Oscar-winning performance as George M. Cohan at the screening of 1942's "Yankee Doodle Dandy. " Oscar-nominated director Rob Marshall is set to appear at the screening of the 1949 musical "On the Town.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Susan King, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom.
TCM Classic Film Festival announced Wednesday that Burt Reynolds and Malcolm McDowell have been added to the roster at the four-day event, which takes place April 25-28 in Hollywood. Reynolds and director John Boorman will join previously announced Jon Voight for a screening of the 1972 classic "Deliverance," while McDowell will discuss James Cagney's Oscar-winning performance as George M. Cohan at the screening of 1942's "Yankee Doodle Dandy. " Oscar-nominated director Rob Marshall is set to appear at the screening of the 1949 musical "On the Town.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2003 | Greg Braxton, Lorenza Munoz and Kristina Sauerwein, Times Staff Writers
Thrilling, and yet ... backstage at the 75th Academy Awards it was a night when winners clutched their Oscars a bit tighter than usual as their comments drifted between winning and war. Wearing a peace pin in his lapel, Chris Cooper, who took home the Oscar for best supporting actor for "Adaptation," expanded on his on-stage wish for peace: "I was watching television today, and the situation is constantly changing. As it goes on, minds will change."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2003 | John Clark, Special to The Times
Hollywood's annual orgy of awards-giving is already upon us, and the two men whose films are early favorites -- "Chicago" director Rob Marshall (eight Golden Globe nominations) and "The Hours" director Stephen Daldry (seven) -- have convened in Manhattan to compare notes and, who knows, to look each other over.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2004 | A Times staff writer
Production of the long-in-the-works movie version of "Memoirs of a Geisha" will begin next month in Los Angeles and Japan with Rob Marshall in the director's chair, Columbia Pictures and DreamWorks Pictures announced. Chinese-born Zhang Ziyi of "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" will play the title role of the young girl Sayuri who becomes a geisha, and Japanese star Ken Watanabe, who appeared as the title character in "The Last Samurai," will portray the businessman with whom she falls in love.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Rob Marshall, the Tony Award-winning choreographer-director of such Broadway hits as "Cabaret" and "Little Me" puts it: "The knee-jerk reaction to 'Annie' is 'Oh, God, the little screaming child in a red dress,' " leaving many adults wanting to flee at the first strains of "Tomorrow." So why is this same Rob Marshall making his TV directorial debut with a production of "Annie" for ABC's "Wonderful World of Disney"? A bit of curiosity at the possibilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2009 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
The man at the center of the universe in "Nine," the sun around which a bevy of beautiful women will circle, needs to be irresistible, radiating heat. Unfortunately, Daniel Day-Lewis is more of a cool blue moon in a distant sky type, which has its own charm, just not one that works for this adaptation of the 1982 Broadway sensation, a musical / stage riff on Fellini's classic "8½," which featured a magnetic Marcello Mastroianni as the misdirected director in the middle. And while we're filling the suggestion box. . . . Because "Nine" is a musical, it would help if your leading man could sing, and I don't mean carry a tune, but actually flex some vocal muscle.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2009 | By BETSY SHARKEY, Film Critic
The man at the center of the universe in "Nine," the sun around which a bevy of beautiful women will circle, needs to be irresistible, radiating heat. Unfortunately, Daniel Day-Lewis is more of a cool blue moon in a distant sky type, which has its own charm, just not one that works for this adaptation of the 1982 Broadway sensation, a musical / stage riff on Fellini's classic "8½," which featured a magnetic Marcello Mastroianni as the misdirected director in the middle. And while we're filling the suggestion box. . . . Because "Nine" is a musical, it would help if your leading man could sing, and I don't mean carry a tune, but actually flex some vocal muscle.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2005 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Every move Komomo makes is rooted in Japanese ritual. The way her body sinks to kneel, or how she uses just the fingertips of her right hand to slide open the wood-framed Japanese doors. The way she moves like smoke across the room on her dancer's toes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2004 | A Times staff writer
Production of the long-in-the-works movie version of "Memoirs of a Geisha" will begin next month in Los Angeles and Japan with Rob Marshall in the director's chair, Columbia Pictures and DreamWorks Pictures announced. Chinese-born Zhang Ziyi of "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" will play the title role of the young girl Sayuri who becomes a geisha, and Japanese star Ken Watanabe, who appeared as the title character in "The Last Samurai," will portray the businessman with whom she falls in love.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Ever since director Rob Marshall's "Chicago" won six Academy Awards earlier this year, Hollywood has been rife with speculation about when the filmmaker will step behind the cameras again. Now Marshall himself is beginning to ask the same question. For more than a month, Marshall and three studios -- Miramax, Sony and DreamWorks -- have been caught in a battle involving "Memoirs of a Geisha," the long-delayed, much-anticipated adaptation of Arthur S. Golden's bestselling novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2003 | Greg Braxton, Lorenza Munoz and Kristina Sauerwein, Times Staff Writers
Thrilling, and yet ... backstage at the 75th Academy Awards it was a night when winners clutched their Oscars a bit tighter than usual as their comments drifted between winning and war. Wearing a peace pin in his lapel, Chris Cooper, who took home the Oscar for best supporting actor for "Adaptation," expanded on his on-stage wish for peace: "I was watching television today, and the situation is constantly changing. As it goes on, minds will change."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2003 | John Clark, Special to The Times
Hollywood's annual orgy of awards-giving is already upon us, and the two men whose films are early favorites -- "Chicago" director Rob Marshall (eight Golden Globe nominations) and "The Hours" director Stephen Daldry (seven) -- have convened in Manhattan to compare notes and, who knows, to look each other over.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2005 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Every move Komomo makes is rooted in Japanese ritual. The way her body sinks to kneel, or how she uses just the fingertips of her right hand to slide open the wood-framed Japanese doors. The way she moves like smoke across the room on her dancer's toes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2002 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Ever since she landed in Hollywood a couple years back, the Welsh-born actress Catherine Zeta-Jones has been playing the part of an old-fashioned star with a vengeance. She made a splash in silly (but lucrative) entertainments like "The Mask of Zorro" and "Entrapment" in which she confidently flaunted her lush physicality, only to turn around and flex her acting chops with a supporting role in Steven Soderbergh's "Traffic."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2002 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Ever since she landed in Hollywood a couple years back, the Welsh-born actress Catherine Zeta-Jones has been playing the part of an old-fashioned star with a vengeance. She made a splash in silly (but lucrative) entertainments like "The Mask of Zorro" and "Entrapment" in which she confidently flaunted her lush physicality, only to turn around and flex her acting chops with a supporting role in Steven Soderbergh's "Traffic."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002 | Michele Willens, Special to The Times
Broadway director-choreographer Rob Marshall was invited to the Miramax Films offices here a year and a half ago to discuss directing the film version of "Rent." But he had a secret agenda. He knew the company had been trying for years to get a film version of one of his favorite stage musicals, "Chicago," off the ground. "Right before we started, I said, 'I know you're trying to do "Chicago." ' And I said, 'Can I just tell you what I would do with the movie?'
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