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Rob Nelson

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January 9, 1991 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Nelson has dyslexia. Sometimes he sees letters reversed, and sometimes he misses letters and words completely. It makes reading books, magazines and newspapers difficult. "I shied away from reading, especially after I got into high school and we had to read textbooks in class," said Nelson, a first baseman in the Chicago White Sox farm system. But Nelson says dyslexia doesn't affect his skills on the baseball field.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2002 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Talk show host Rob Nelson is promoted as, "Finally ... a man who listens." He may listen, but apparently not enough people were watching "The Rob Nelson Show," so the 2-month-old daytime talk fest has been overhauled. The result is like a menu makeover at the Olive Garden: More palatable but not exactly fine dining. In its original form, the program, which airs weekdays at 11 a.m. on KTTV in the L.A. market, played up Nelson's do-gooder nature as a Gen X Phil Donahue.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a rehearsal for Rob Nelson's new talk show, "The Full Nelson," what some people might consider to be a walking, talking argument for gun control stood up and spoke in opposition to gun legislation. He was the type of guy whom the neighbors would describe as "quiet" and "kept to himself." In fact, his demeanor was so eerie that the studio audience and guest panelists found him frightening. Nelson, youngish (35), dapper in a Calvin Klein suit, and holding the mike, was delighted.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a rehearsal for Rob Nelson's new talk show, "The Full Nelson," what some people might consider to be a walking, talking argument for gun control stood up and spoke in opposition to gun legislation. He was the type of guy whom the neighbors would describe as "quiet" and "kept to himself." In fact, his demeanor was so eerie that the studio audience and guest panelists found him frightening. Nelson, youngish (35), dapper in a Calvin Klein suit, and holding the mike, was delighted.
SPORTS
March 29, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Nelson couldn't believe it. Finally, something right was going his way. When he drove away from the ballpark Wednesday afternoon, he knew there was nothing, not a thing, that could possibly spoil his day. His wife could scream at him. His seven-month-old baby could cry all night. Bikers could ride up and down the hallway of his hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2002 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
Talk show host Rob Nelson is promoted as, "Finally ... a man who listens." He may listen, but apparently not enough people were watching "The Rob Nelson Show," so the 2-month-old daytime talk fest has been overhauled. The result is like a menu makeover at the Olive Garden: More palatable but not exactly fine dining. In its original form, the program, which airs weekdays at 11 a.m. on KTTV in the L.A. market, played up Nelson's do-gooder nature as a Gen X Phil Donahue.
SPORTS
February 13, 1988
In the past three years, it has become painfully obvious to Padre fans across the country that the interests of the ballclub no longer reflect the philosophy of bringing a winning baseball team to San Diego. While the Dodgers have solidified their chances of winning the National League West this year by signing Detroit free agent Kirk Gibson, the Padres continue to justify their lack of action in the off-season by stating that available talent would not improve upon the team they fielded last year.
SPORTS
March 25, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Rob Nelson, a first-base prospect for the Padres, had just enlivened an intrasquad game by powering a ball about 425 feet over the right-field fence and into a parking lot. "Did you get all of it?" someone jokingly asked him after he had crossed home plate. "If you saw it come down, then I didn't get all of it," he said with a shrug.
SPORTS
March 10, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Rob Nelson, a first base prospect for the Padres, had just livened up an intrasquad game by powering a ball about 425 feet over a right field fence and into a parking lot. "Did you get all of it?" someone jokingly asked him after he crossed home plate. "If you saw it come down," he said with a shrug, "then I didn't get all of it." Such has been the attitude Nelson has taken toward a six-year pro career that has yet to stop in the big leagues for more than a couple of hours at a time.
SPORTS
May 18, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Rob Nelson knew he was supposed to be patient and all that. It was the sixth inning of a tie game between the Padres and the Montreal Expos and there were runners on first and second and none out. This was not the time to swing himself into a new dance step. Nelson came to the plate Wednesday night and told himself to wait, battle, find the right pitch. But here it came, on Pascual Perez's first pitch. A fastball about thigh high. And Nelson, who has been waiting for more than two lousy seasons, could wait no more.
SPORTS
September 10, 1998 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trivia buffs already have memorized the name of Steve Trachsel, the pitcher who surrendered Mark McGwire's 62nd home run, the one that shattered the hallowed record of Roger Maris. But, for bonus points, can you name the first baseman who lost his job to McGwire during the slugger's rookie season? No one besides fantasy league freaks--and few of them existed then--paid much attention when the Oakland Athletics made an apparently minor roster move two weeks into the 1987 season.
SPORTS
January 9, 1991 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Nelson has dyslexia. Sometimes he sees letters reversed, and sometimes he misses letters and words completely. It makes reading books, magazines and newspapers difficult. "I shied away from reading, especially after I got into high school and we had to read textbooks in class," said Nelson, a first baseman in the Chicago White Sox farm system. But Nelson says dyslexia doesn't affect his skills on the baseball field.
SPORTS
April 7, 1990 | JIM LINDGREN
It was a little later than expected--about a week because of the delay caused by the spring training lockout--but the Padres returned to San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium Friday ready to begin their first regular season of the '90s, their fourth decade in the major leagues. It was 21 years ago Sunday--April 8, 1969--that the Padres opened their first season with a 2-1 victory over Houston in San Diego Stadium.
SPORTS
March 29, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Nelson couldn't believe it. Finally, something right was going his way. When he drove away from the ballpark Wednesday afternoon, he knew there was nothing, not a thing, that could possibly spoil his day. His wife could scream at him. His seven-month-old baby could cry all night. Bikers could ride up and down the hallway of his hotel.
SPORTS
June 18, 1989 | CURT HOLBREICH, Times Staff Writer
Only a few nights ago, first baseman Jack Clark was in a baseball depression that seemed as if it might never end. His stroke gone, his ego bruised, his strikeout count climbing, Clark was searching for an answer. A few games off was the suggested remedy. But a game such as Saturday night's might be better. Returning to the starting lineup for the first time in four games, Clark hit a two-run, eighth-inning homer to give the Padres a 2-1 victory over the Houston Astros in front of a tote bag night crowd of 41,118 at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium.
SPORTS
June 15, 1989 | SCOTT MILLER
Eric Show grabbed at a piece of history again Wednesday night, his fourth try at it since May 28. This time, almost everything worked. He battled, made some good pitches when he had to and finally corraled career victory No. 93, a 4-2 verdict over Cincinnati. Show shoved Randy Jones into second place on the Padre all-time career victory list and helped push the Padres into the win column for just the second time this month. "When the smoke clears on this, obviously I feel honored," Show said.
SPORTS
September 10, 1998 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trivia buffs already have memorized the name of Steve Trachsel, the pitcher who surrendered Mark McGwire's 62nd home run, the one that shattered the hallowed record of Roger Maris. But, for bonus points, can you name the first baseman who lost his job to McGwire during the slugger's rookie season? No one besides fantasy league freaks--and few of them existed then--paid much attention when the Oakland Athletics made an apparently minor roster move two weeks into the 1987 season.
SPORTS
May 8, 1989 | SCOTT MILLER
Late Night with the Padres Saturday evening included a phone call to Las Vegas, plane tickets and clubhouse reservations for two in time for Sunday afternoon. Rob Nelson and Jerald Clark were going to play baseball anyway Sunday, but Saturday night they found out they were going to play in San Diego, not triple-A baseball in Las Vegas. To make room, the Padres sent shortstop Gary Green to Las Vegas and placed John Kruk (hip pointer) on the 15-day disabled list. They purchased the contract of first baseman Nelson from Las Vegas and recalled outfielder Clark.
SPORTS
May 25, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Call it what you want. A fan, a whiff, a big fat K. The Padres are doing it in near-record numbers, and they are being booed for it. The Padres struck out 13 more times Wednesday night in a 3-0 loss to the New York Mets in front of a surly crowd of 26,766 at San Diego Jack Murphy Stadium. It was the Padres' sixth shutout loss, second worst in baseball, but here's something worse than that: It was the Met pitching staff's first shutout since last Sept. 11, a span of 61 games. The futility clincher: The Padres lead all of baseball with 296 strikeouts in 47 games.
SPORTS
May 18, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Rob Nelson knew he was supposed to be patient and all that. It was the sixth inning of a tie game between the Padres and the Montreal Expos and there were runners on first and second and none out. This was not the time to swing himself into a new dance step. Nelson came to the plate Wednesday night and told himself to wait, battle, find the right pitch. But here it came, on Pascual Perez's first pitch. A fastball about thigh high. And Nelson, who has been waiting for more than two lousy seasons, could wait no more.
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