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Rob Sullivan

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1996 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dysfunction abounds in solo performance these days, and before writing his show, Rob Sullivan sat through his share of dramatic confessionals. "I think that's one of the reasons I haven't done any one-man shows in a while, because a lot of them are rather indulgent," Sullivan said. "My first show was autobiographical, but not so many people were doing it then. Now every Joe is telling, 'Oh, this is my latest breakup.' " His instinct was to parody this bare-your-pain trend.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1996 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dysfunction abounds in solo performance these days, and before writing his show, Rob Sullivan sat through his share of dramatic confessionals. "I think that's one of the reasons I haven't done any one-man shows in a while, because a lot of them are rather indulgent," Sullivan said. "My first show was autobiographical, but not so many people were doing it then. Now every Joe is telling, 'Oh, this is my latest breakup.' " His instinct was to parody this bare-your-pain trend.
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SPORTS
February 20, 1987 | DAN HAFNER, Times Staff Writer
A couple of weeks ago, Rob Sullivan was merely the obscure No. 5 player on Coach Eddie Merrins' UCLA golf team. Suddenly, Sullivan is a celebrity. He is amazed at all the attention. When Sullivan, 20, the leader among those who had to qualify for the Los Angeles Open, relinquished his spot so that popular Seve Ballesteros could play, he thought he was merely making a nice gesture for golf.
SPORTS
February 20, 1987 | DAN HAFNER, Times Staff Writer
A couple of weeks ago, Rob Sullivan was merely the obscure No. 5 player on Coach Eddie Merrins' UCLA golf team. Suddenly, Sullivan is a celebrity. He is amazed at all the attention. When Sullivan, 20, the leader among those who had to qualify for the Los Angeles Open, relinquished his spot so that popular Seve Ballesteros could play, he thought he was merely making a nice gesture for golf.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1999
Only The Times could wear the blinders of self-righteousness so snugly as to denounce the decibel-splintering sound levels of trailers ("Sounding Off on Trailers," by Michael P. Lucas, May 7) while completely ignoring its own commercials that drone at decibel-splintering levels at movie theaters throughout Southern California. ROB SULLIVAN, Los Angeles After reading the Calendar piece on movie trailers being louder than the feature, it is only too obvious that the theater projectionist is being left out of the performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1992
In light of the controversies surrounding the National Endowment for the Arts, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the Public Broadcasting Service, perhaps it is wise to recall the words of a late statesman: "You can't regulate the development of literature, art and culture with a stick or by barking orders. You can't lay down a furrow and then harness all your artists to make sure they don't deviate from the straight and narrow. If you try to control your artists too tightly, there will be no clashing of opinions, consequently no criticism, and consequently no truth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1996
It was most interesting to read your Sept. 10 article on Robert Eugene Sullivan and the man who assumed his identity. I was also a victim of Willie Clifton Wright, the con man who tainted Sullivan's credit rating. During the mid- to late-1980s I received numerous phone calls from creditors and bill collectors, threatening me with legal action and worse if I didn't pay any number of outstanding bills. Well, I may have some faults but bad credit isn't among them; I just had the misfortune to bear a name which was very similar to the poor teacher who was victimized by this con man for 10 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1990
So now we're supposed to weep and moan with George and Barbara Bush as they agonize over the fate of their son Neil and his troubles with the Silverado Banking, Savings & Loan ("Bush Discloses Anguish Over Son's Troubles," front page, July 12). What about weeping for the taxpayers who have to shell out $150 billion (or is up to $300 billion now? Or $600 billion? Or a trillion?) to bail out the savings and loan industry? What about those depositors who lost thousands and thousand of extra dollars when the Silverado investigation was postponed so it would fall after the 1988 presidential election?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1991
So now that our City Charter is being "abused," Councilman Joel Wachs has the courage to stand up and defend it against all attackers (Commentary, April 10). Funny, where was Wachs' outrage when Gates was slandering practically every racial and sexual minority in our community? Where was his Op-Ed piece when the LAPD brutalized more than 50 demonstrators during the Justice for Janitors march last summer in Century City?
SPORTS
May 3, 1989 | Associated Press
Arizona State held on to first place by three strokes over Arizona, 721-724, after Tuesday's second round of the Pacific 10 Golf Championships at the par-70, 6,116-yard Broadmoor Golf Club. The Wildcats had the low team total of the day with a score of 357. UCLA was next at 361. Individually, seven players recorded sub-par rounds, compared with just four Monday. Christian Cevaer of Stanford, John Bizik of Arizona State, Jon Lindstrom of Washington State and Rob Sullivan of UCLA each carded two-under-par rounds of 68 to tie for low-round honors.
SCIENCE
January 17, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
NASA's Spirit rover extended its mechanical arm overnight Thursday, deploying a microscope for the first close-up look at the Martian surface. The microscope, which has about the same resolution as a geologist's hand magnifying glass, showed a finely powdered surface that seemed to be held together by unknown forces. The instrument can distinguish objects about the size of a strand of hair or a grain of salt.
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