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Robber Barons

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BUSINESS
October 24, 1990 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linking his confrontation with a Japanese auto parts firm to a campaign to open up corporate Japan, American investor T. Boone Pickens on Tuesday stepped up his attacks on Japan's business giants by calling them anti-competitive "modern-day robber barons." During a news conference in Los Angeles, Pickens said Toyota Motor Co. and Koito Manufacturing Co., which supplies auto parts to Toyota, have been conspiring to deny him representation on Koito's board of directors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012
Rather than launch a follow-up to Charlie Sheen's "Violent Torpedo of Truth" live tour, "Two and a Half Men" star Angus T. Jones is partially apologizing for his recent comments against the successful CBS sitcom. The 19-year-old actor made headlines Monday after appearing in a testimonial posted by the Forerunner Christian Church in which he labeled the long-running program "filth" and urged people not to watch it - in addition to noting his desire to no longer be part of the series.
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MAGAZINE
August 29, 1993 | Carey Goldberg, Carey Goldberg is a correspondent in The Times' Moscow bureau. She has reported from Russia since 1989.
Sergei Shashurin, possibly the richest man in Russia, leans back with a drowsy, contented smile. His leased Yak 40 business jet is winging him from Tatarstan, where he is known as an organized crime kingpin and construction titan, to the Arctic Circle city of Vorkuta, where he has designs on some of Europe's biggest coal mines. The six-hour flight stretches long.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2012 | By David Horsey
The small gangs of destructive knuckleheads who style themselves as anarchists have been the bane of Occupy Wall Street protests this spring. On May Day, the brats in black smashed store windows, bashed cars and fought with police on the streets of Seattle, Oakland, Montreal and other cities. Their antics stole attention from the thousands of peaceful protesters who may have had serious things to say about the expanding divide between rich and poor.  The same thing happened in Chicago over the last few days as a somewhat disjointed but largely peaceful protest outside the NATO summit meeting was upstaged by the arrests of five would-be anarchists on charges of domestic terrorism.
MAGAZINE
December 7, 1997
Eli Broad doesn't get it ("Playing Harball," by Diane Haithman, Oct. 19). The ultimate value of any creative endeavor is to provide artful insight into our world. To not understand the relationship between Frank Gehry and his architecture is to believe that someone other than Richard Serra could have sculpted the piece that Broad took such pains to own. David L. Gray Santa Monica For some reason we always end up resenting wildly successful entrepreneurs like Eli Broad or the even more visible Bill Gates.
BOOKS
October 8, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
When the newly wealthy merchants and robber barons found themselves shut out of New York's "Old Society" after the Civil War, they turned to London, where money, charm and looks could provide entree. This American invasion produced a brisk trade in U.S. dollars and English titles, as New World heiresses wed impoverished British noblemen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1993
With his usual insight and clarity, Robert Scheer points out the absurdity of the media gossip that portrays celebrities and the powerful as "just like the rest of us," but he misses the salient point ("Civic Life Rots While Gossip Rides High," Commentary, Aug. 19). The powerful and the celebrated--the people who make laws, publish news, shape opinion and provide diversion for the rest of us--are universally possessed by the bizarre delusion that they are just like the rest of us. The sad soul sitting in a trailer park knows far better than to think that she's in any respect "just like Cher," but the celebrities and oligarchs themselves prate endlessly through the media about what ordinary, hard-working, aw-shucks kinds of everyday people they are. In the bad old days of frank aristocrats and overt robber barons, law, guilt or noblesse oblige placed the burden of tending the public garden on the well-strapped shoulders of the privileged.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2012 | By David Horsey
The small gangs of destructive knuckleheads who style themselves as anarchists have been the bane of Occupy Wall Street protests this spring. On May Day, the brats in black smashed store windows, bashed cars and fought with police on the streets of Seattle, Oakland, Montreal and other cities. Their antics stole attention from the thousands of peaceful protesters who may have had serious things to say about the expanding divide between rich and poor.  The same thing happened in Chicago over the last few days as a somewhat disjointed but largely peaceful protest outside the NATO summit meeting was upstaged by the arrests of five would-be anarchists on charges of domestic terrorism.
OPINION
February 19, 2008
Re "Tax loophole saved at expense of poor," column, Feb. 18 Although we are all going to lose comforts that we take for granted during this recession, our Republican state legislators seem to have lost their consciences. While the poor absorb the greatest losses as public education and Medi-Cal are punished with dramatic cuts, the Republicans managed to protect those purchasing yachts from paying taxes on their pleasure cruisers. The lack of common sense and decency defies comprehension.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009 | Choire Sicha
Tom Morello is perhaps best known as the guitarist for rock bands Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave, but the politically minded L.A. transplant has recorded as the Nightwatchman and has just created another band, Street Sweeper. His West Coast "Justice Tour," which benefits regional nonprofit PATH (People Assisting the Homeless), stops at the Music Box @ the Fonda on Saturday. -- You went to Libertyville High School in the northern Chicago suburbs. How did you like it?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2009 | Choire Sicha
Tom Morello is perhaps best known as the guitarist for rock bands Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave, but the politically minded L.A. transplant has recorded as the Nightwatchman and has just created another band, Street Sweeper. His West Coast "Justice Tour," which benefits regional nonprofit PATH (People Assisting the Homeless), stops at the Music Box @ the Fonda on Saturday. -- You went to Libertyville High School in the northern Chicago suburbs. How did you like it?
OPINION
February 19, 2008
Re "Tax loophole saved at expense of poor," column, Feb. 18 Although we are all going to lose comforts that we take for granted during this recession, our Republican state legislators seem to have lost their consciences. While the poor absorb the greatest losses as public education and Medi-Cal are punished with dramatic cuts, the Republicans managed to protect those purchasing yachts from paying taxes on their pleasure cruisers. The lack of common sense and decency defies comprehension.
SPORTS
May 17, 2001 | T.J. SIMERS
Picture NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue in an orange jumpsuit sitting behind bars in L.A. County Jail. I have--I see him being embraced by Raider fans. There was a time Wednesday when I thought it might happen, the big bore being slapped in handcuffs and hauled off on contempt charges to serve six months for delivering "incomplete and misleading" financial documents to a Los Angeles Superior Court jury that is trying to determine who is telling the truth, the NFL or the Raiders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998
Re: "Community College Labor Talks," March 18, 1998. Charlene Arnold's letter continues the union's attempts to mislead the public. The union chooses to overlook the accountability measures that determine the flow of funds to this district--and to their pocketbooks. The district office performs most if not all of the reporting functions that guarantee the continued flow of these dollars. The district office also processes faculty payroll and handles their health insurance and other employment-related matters.
MAGAZINE
December 7, 1997
Eli Broad doesn't get it ("Playing Harball," by Diane Haithman, Oct. 19). The ultimate value of any creative endeavor is to provide artful insight into our world. To not understand the relationship between Frank Gehry and his architecture is to believe that someone other than Richard Serra could have sculpted the piece that Broad took such pains to own. David L. Gray Santa Monica For some reason we always end up resenting wildly successful entrepreneurs like Eli Broad or the even more visible Bill Gates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1995
Re "We've Got to Stop Cheating Our Children," Commentary, July 31: By far the most astounding statement that Speaker Newt Gingrich makes is that America is desperately in need of a so-called "opportunity society . . . free of bureaucracy and regulations," as if that were a new idea. This country had just such a society at the close of the last century. It is usually referred to as the Age of the Robber Barons. The American marketplace was then an incredibly dangerous place for consumers, with no guarantee that meat was untainted, medicine more than a concoction of alcohol and cocaine and that your bank was anywhere close to solvent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998
Re: "Community College Labor Talks," March 18, 1998. Charlene Arnold's letter continues the union's attempts to mislead the public. The union chooses to overlook the accountability measures that determine the flow of funds to this district--and to their pocketbooks. The district office performs most if not all of the reporting functions that guarantee the continued flow of these dollars. The district office also processes faculty payroll and handles their health insurance and other employment-related matters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2012
Rather than launch a follow-up to Charlie Sheen's "Violent Torpedo of Truth" live tour, "Two and a Half Men" star Angus T. Jones is partially apologizing for his recent comments against the successful CBS sitcom. The 19-year-old actor made headlines Monday after appearing in a testimonial posted by the Forerunner Christian Church in which he labeled the long-running program "filth" and urged people not to watch it - in addition to noting his desire to no longer be part of the series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1993
With his usual insight and clarity, Robert Scheer points out the absurdity of the media gossip that portrays celebrities and the powerful as "just like the rest of us," but he misses the salient point ("Civic Life Rots While Gossip Rides High," Commentary, Aug. 19). The powerful and the celebrated--the people who make laws, publish news, shape opinion and provide diversion for the rest of us--are universally possessed by the bizarre delusion that they are just like the rest of us. The sad soul sitting in a trailer park knows far better than to think that she's in any respect "just like Cher," but the celebrities and oligarchs themselves prate endlessly through the media about what ordinary, hard-working, aw-shucks kinds of everyday people they are. In the bad old days of frank aristocrats and overt robber barons, law, guilt or noblesse oblige placed the burden of tending the public garden on the well-strapped shoulders of the privileged.
MAGAZINE
August 29, 1993 | Carey Goldberg, Carey Goldberg is a correspondent in The Times' Moscow bureau. She has reported from Russia since 1989.
Sergei Shashurin, possibly the richest man in Russia, leans back with a drowsy, contented smile. His leased Yak 40 business jet is winging him from Tatarstan, where he is known as an organized crime kingpin and construction titan, to the Arctic Circle city of Vorkuta, where he has designs on some of Europe's biggest coal mines. The six-hour flight stretches long.
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