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Robberies Northern Ireland

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December 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Armed robbers stole literary treasures from a library in the city of Armagh, among them a copy of "Gulliver's Travels" that included handwritten alterations by author Jonathan Swift. The two robbers burst into the public library in Armagh, about 35 miles southeast of Belfast, Northern Ireland's capital, and held a gun to a library assistant's head before tying her up, police said. The robbers then systematically smashed glass cases and stole items estimated to be worth about $165,000.
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NEWS
December 15, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Armed robbers stole literary treasures from a library in the city of Armagh, among them a copy of "Gulliver's Travels" that included handwritten alterations by author Jonathan Swift. The two robbers burst into the public library in Armagh, about 35 miles southeast of Belfast, Northern Ireland's capital, and held a gun to a library assistant's head before tying her up, police said. The robbers then systematically smashed glass cases and stole items estimated to be worth about $165,000.
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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British undercover soldiers shot dead three young masked robbers in Northern Ireland, sparking an angry controversy. The Irish Republic government in Dublin ordered its own probe of the killings. Gerry Adams, president of the Irish Republican Army's political wing, said the three were not members of the IRA, the guerrilla group battling to oust Britain from Northern Ireland. Adams called the shootings "the cold-blooded and savage murder of three young men."
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pause in the sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics in Northern Ireland has brought a small, vulnerable Chinese community here under fierce pressure from both sides. Police are investigating more than two dozen attacks so far this year by hooded intruders who break into the homes of Chinese families late at night to terrorize and steal.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pause in the sectarian violence between Protestants and Roman Catholics in Northern Ireland has brought a small, vulnerable Chinese community here under fierce pressure from both sides. Police are investigating more than two dozen attacks so far this year by hooded intruders who break into the homes of Chinese families late at night to terrorize and steal.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British undercover soldiers shot dead three young masked robbers in Northern Ireland, sparking an angry controversy. The Irish Republic government in Dublin ordered its own probe of the killings. Gerry Adams, president of the Irish Republican Army's political wing, said the three were not members of the IRA, the guerrilla group battling to oust Britain from Northern Ireland. Adams called the shootings "the cold-blooded and savage murder of three young men."
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