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NEWS
November 23, 1990 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Charles Thurman Sinclair died of a heart attack in an Anchorage, Alaska, jail cell last month, he was mourned by his family and by dozens of detectives in police departments from Missouri to Alaska. His relatives saw the loss of a sportsman and loving family man. Detectives, however, lost the chance to question the man they are convinced left a trail of bodies across the West.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1999 | NANCY TREJOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ring of jewelry thieves that for decades has terrorized the jewelry industry throughout the country is resurfacing locally, police say. "It's rearing its ugly head again," said Det. Mike Woodings of the Los Angeles Police Department. Woodings, who has been tracking the ring since 1988, said the holdup of an Encino jewelry manufacturer last week appears to be the work of the national syndicate.
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NEWS
January 19, 1987 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
Half the offenders in 20 million cases of rape, robbery and assault committed from 1982 through 1984 were known to their victims, according to a study released Sunday by the Justice Department. The department's Bureau of Justice Statistics determined that overall, 46% of the crimes were committed by total strangers, 31% by friends and acquaintances, 8% by relatives and 11% by people known to the victims on sight. The remaining 4% could not be classified.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a throwback to the Wild West, freight trains thundering through this parched valley are being swarmed by bandits who plunder their cargoes, then flee back across the Mexican border--which in some places is only 10 paces from the tracks. The thieves stage their raids from a nearby squatters' camp, a cluster of cardboard and wood shanties where 40,000 people live without running water, sewers or law enforcement. It is known as Colonia Anapra.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Violent crimes in the United States went up by 5% in the first half of the year, the FBI said, as a surge fueled by more murders and drug-related incidents involving assault weapons continued. The federal law enforcement agency reported that the increase in violent crime was led by a 9% jump in robberies, followed by a 5% gain in murders and a 4% rise in rapes. Among the violent crimes, the smallest increase was posted for aggravated assaults, which were 2% higher than last year's levels.
NEWS
May 8, 1989
The percentage of victims of rape, robbery and assault who were physically injured during the course of an attack increased from 1979 to 1986, according to a Department of Justice survey. Of the average 2.2 million people hurt each year, 357,830 suffered serious injury and 1.83 million suffered minor injury, the report said. About 1%, or almost 23,000 people, suffered gunshot wounds, about 77,000 had knife wounds, 141,500 suffered broken bones or teeth, 64,000 had internal injuries and 84,000 lost consciousness.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | DAVE LESHER, Times Staff Writer
On a wall in his island home on Puget Sound, Michael Taylor hung a picture of himself posing in front of posters of the FBI's 10 Most Wanted fugitives. Police who searched the place saw it as an expression of an ambition. "It seemed like it would make his life to be on that 10 Most Wanted list," said John Desmond, a Newport Beach police detective. Today, Taylor may be a candidate for just such a distinction.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Violent offenses as well as simple thefts often are motivated by a need to buy illegal drugs, the Justice Department said in a report on a nationwide jailhouse survey. About 219,000 convicted offenders were surveyed on whether they committed their crimes to get drug money, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. It said that about one in three convicted robbers and burglars gave drug money as a motive.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a throwback to the Wild West, freight trains thundering through this parched valley are being swarmed by bandits who plunder their cargoes, then flee back across the Mexican border--which in some places is only 10 paces from the tracks. The thieves stage their raids from a nearby squatters' camp, a cluster of cardboard and wood shanties where 40,000 people live without running water, sewers or law enforcement. It is known as Colonia Anapra.
NEWS
March 5, 1988 | ANN WIENER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. postal authorities have bolstered security on thousands of delivery Jeeps and have sent out flyers to local businesses in an effort to deter a band of thieves responsible for stealing millions of dollars in government checks from postal vehicles in Southern California. The thieves have bilked Mexican banks for an estimated $2.5 million worth of U.S. Treasury checks.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Violent crimes in the United States went up by 5% in the first half of the year, the FBI said, as a surge fueled by more murders and drug-related incidents involving assault weapons continued. The federal law enforcement agency reported that the increase in violent crime was led by a 9% jump in robberies, followed by a 5% gain in murders and a 4% rise in rapes. Among the violent crimes, the smallest increase was posted for aggravated assaults, which were 2% higher than last year's levels.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
The chances of being a crime victim continued to decline last year for most Americans, but blacks and Latinos were much more likely than whites to be victimized, the government reported Sunday. The National Crime Victimization Survey, released by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, showed that crimes against individuals age 12 and over fell 3.6% from 1989 to 1990. There were 18.9 million individual crimes in 1990, compared to 19.7 million the year before, the report said.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Violent offenses as well as simple thefts often are motivated by a need to buy illegal drugs, the Justice Department said in a report on a nationwide jailhouse survey. About 219,000 convicted offenders were surveyed on whether they committed their crimes to get drug money, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. It said that about one in three convicted robbers and burglars gave drug money as a motive.
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | From Associated Press
Seven American cities recorded more than one fourth of all murders in the United States, the FBI said Sunday in releasing its preliminary crime report for 1990. Six of the seven cities saw more murders last year than in 1989. The exception was Detroit, where there were 582 killings, or 42 fewer than in the year before. According to 1990 Census figures, the seven cities account for slightly less than 7.5% of the U.S. population.
NEWS
December 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The number of drug-trafficking convictions in state courts rose 50% in just two years, the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics reported. It also said that 41% of drug dealers convicted in 1988 were sentenced to state prisons, up from 37% two years earlier. "In 1986, about 185,000 adults were arrested for serious drug-trafficking offenses," said Steven Dillingham, bureau director. "By 1988, the number of these arrests reached almost 290,000."
NEWS
November 23, 1990 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Charles Thurman Sinclair died of a heart attack in an Anchorage, Alaska, jail cell last month, he was mourned by his family and by dozens of detectives in police departments from Missouri to Alaska. His relatives saw the loss of a sportsman and loving family man. Detectives, however, lost the chance to question the man they are convinced left a trail of bodies across the West.
NEWS
October 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
The chances of being a crime victim continued to decline last year for most Americans, but blacks and Latinos were much more likely than whites to be victimized, the government reported Sunday. The National Crime Victimization Survey, released by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, showed that crimes against individuals age 12 and over fell 3.6% from 1989 to 1990. There were 18.9 million individual crimes in 1990, compared to 19.7 million the year before, the report said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1999 | NANCY TREJOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A ring of jewelry thieves that for decades has terrorized the jewelry industry throughout the country is resurfacing locally, police say. "It's rearing its ugly head again," said Det. Mike Woodings of the Los Angeles Police Department. Woodings, who has been tracking the ring since 1988, said the holdup of an Encino jewelry manufacturer last week appears to be the work of the national syndicate.
NEWS
May 8, 1989
The percentage of victims of rape, robbery and assault who were physically injured during the course of an attack increased from 1979 to 1986, according to a Department of Justice survey. Of the average 2.2 million people hurt each year, 357,830 suffered serious injury and 1.83 million suffered minor injury, the report said. About 1%, or almost 23,000 people, suffered gunshot wounds, about 77,000 had knife wounds, 141,500 suffered broken bones or teeth, 64,000 had internal injuries and 84,000 lost consciousness.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | DAVE LESHER, Times Staff Writer
On a wall in his island home on Puget Sound, Michael Taylor hung a picture of himself posing in front of posters of the FBI's 10 Most Wanted fugitives. Police who searched the place saw it as an expression of an ambition. "It seemed like it would make his life to be on that 10 Most Wanted list," said John Desmond, a Newport Beach police detective. Today, Taylor may be a candidate for just such a distinction.
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