Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobbie Coltrane
IN THE NEWS

Robbie Coltrane

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | FRAZIER MOORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
What's with this bloke? He's overweight, tieless and given to permanently wrinkled suits. He's a boozer, a gambler, a man who's blown his marriage and alienated his son. He can't keep a job. His manners stink. And he smokes. But in spite of himself, Dr. Eddie (Fitz') Fitzgerald is as charming a hero as you are likely to meet. Charming, as in: can't take your eyes off him. Heroic, as in: overpowering and indominable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2006 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
POLITICAL correctness never was the distinguishing characteristic of "Cracker," the BBC's lauded 1990s crime drama starring Robbie Coltrane as Dr. Edward "Fitz" Fitzgerald. The obese and abrasive criminal psychologist always had plenty to say about feminists -- or anyone, such as his wife, who thought he should curb his drinking or gambling. Now Fitz is back, in a one-time reprise airing on BBC America Oct. 30. This time, it appears his target is the U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talented comedic actors often are able to transform themselves into dramatic actors of exceptional sensitivity. Jack Lemmon and Tom Hanks are two film clowns who won best actor Oscars for dramas ("Save the Tiger" and "Philadelphia," respectively). Fellow Oscar winner Emma Thompson started out doing sketch comedy and musical theater before starring in the dramatic films "Howards End" and "Remains of the Day." Now Scottish actor Robbie Coltrane is joining their career paths.
NEWS
February 19, 1995 | FRAZIER MOORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
What's with this bloke? He's overweight, tieless and given to permanently wrinkled suits. He's a boozer, a gambler, a man who's blown his marriage and alienated his son. He can't keep a job. His manners stink. And he smokes. But in spite of himself, Dr. Eddie (Fitz') Fitzgerald is as charming a hero as you are likely to meet. Charming, as in: can't take your eyes off him. Heroic, as in: overpowering and indominable.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991 | David Gritten
What's in a name? Ask the producers of "The Pope Must Die," a lighthearted British-produced comedy starring Robbie Coltrane ("Nuns on the Run"). Coltrane plays a sweet-natured rock 'n' roll musician turned priest who is accidentally (don't ask how) elected pontiff. Pope Dave I then becomes the target of murder attempts by arms-dealing bankers working with sinister forces in the Vatican, an echo of the real-life Calvi affair and of a subplot in "Godfather III."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1994 | LIZ SMITH
Here's good news about the script of "Goldeneye," Pierce Brosnan's coming debut as James Bond. It will not be politically correct! This means--among other things--plenty of surgically enhanced lovelies who want to kill 007 or bed him. Or both. (I see "The Girls of Goldeneye" in a future edition of Playboy!) The film's two bad guys are Sean Bean (you might remember his well-muscled anatomy from "Lady Chatterley's Lover") and Robbie Coltrane (A&E's "Cracker").
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2006 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
POLITICAL correctness never was the distinguishing characteristic of "Cracker," the BBC's lauded 1990s crime drama starring Robbie Coltrane as Dr. Edward "Fitz" Fitzgerald. The obese and abrasive criminal psychologist always had plenty to say about feminists -- or anyone, such as his wife, who thought he should curb his drinking or gambling. Now Fitz is back, in a one-time reprise airing on BBC America Oct. 30. This time, it appears his target is the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX
"The Pope Must Die" will be retitled "The Pope Must Diet" so that distributor Miramax Pictures can re-attempt to place ads with the Big Three networks and some major newspapers that have refused to sell ad time and space due to the film's controversial original name. Spokesman Johnathan Marder said the change was made to the R-rated movie "to draw attention to the fact that this is a comedy and not a political manifesto."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Frogs for Snakes" opens with Barbara Hershey tarted up in hot pants and a curly blond wig entering a Manhattan skyscraper and coolly pulling a gun on a guy who has only kinky sex on his mind. Sounding like Fran Drescher, she orders him to pay up and makes clear how serious she is by shooting him in the foot. She takes the money, heads home to her small apartment and sheds wig and accent for an enthusiastic night of love with her pal Zip (John Leguizamo).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Its publicity calls "Perfectly Normal" (at the AMC Century 14) "a magical comedy" about a perfectly normal guy persuaded by an extraordinary friend to act upon his dreams. It's a film that wants so much to be loved and is crammed with so many engaging characters that it's like kicking a soft-eyed cocker spaniel to mention that those dreams are a device that simply makes no sense.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talented comedic actors often are able to transform themselves into dramatic actors of exceptional sensitivity. Jack Lemmon and Tom Hanks are two film clowns who won best actor Oscars for dramas ("Save the Tiger" and "Philadelphia," respectively). Fellow Oscar winner Emma Thompson started out doing sketch comedy and musical theater before starring in the dramatic films "Howards End" and "Remains of the Day." Now Scottish actor Robbie Coltrane is joining their career paths.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1994 | LIZ SMITH
Here's good news about the script of "Goldeneye," Pierce Brosnan's coming debut as James Bond. It will not be politically correct! This means--among other things--plenty of surgically enhanced lovelies who want to kill 007 or bed him. Or both. (I see "The Girls of Goldeneye" in a future edition of Playboy!) The film's two bad guys are Sean Bean (you might remember his well-muscled anatomy from "Lady Chatterley's Lover") and Robbie Coltrane (A&E's "Cracker").
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991 | David Gritten
What's in a name? Ask the producers of "The Pope Must Die," a lighthearted British-produced comedy starring Robbie Coltrane ("Nuns on the Run"). Coltrane plays a sweet-natured rock 'n' roll musician turned priest who is accidentally (don't ask how) elected pontiff. Pope Dave I then becomes the target of murder attempts by arms-dealing bankers working with sinister forces in the Vatican, an echo of the real-life Calvi affair and of a subplot in "Godfather III."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1997 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
'Tis the season of special effects, almost all of which will be used to raze buildings and raise blood pressure. Like the cheese they are, they stand alone, with little incorporation into plot or purpose, because they are the plot and the purpose.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once having cast Robbie Coltrane, the rotund Glasgow-born actor-comedian, as the head of the Roman Catholic Church in "The Pope Must Die" (selected theaters), writer-director Peter Richardson starts running out of ideas with accelerating speed. Coltrane is wonderful as a sweet-natured priest in a rural Italian orphanage who loves to perform rock 'n' roll for his kids. With his girth, he looks born to wear a cassock.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|