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Robbie Conal

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NEWS
October 2, 2003 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
On a wall in Culver City's Overtones Gallery hangs a series of charcoal on canvas portraits of the famous, ranging from former Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris to Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to Microsoft's Bill Gates. Walking in there is not unlike entering "an evil steakhouse," cracks artist Robbie Conal. "I had to restrain myself from taking a marker and inscribing 'Dear Toots, loved my prime ribs ...
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2010
ART So Many Bad Guys, So Little Time Career rebel Robbie Conal and his ragtag band of guerrilla poster artists have made sport of politicians, bureaucrats, televangelists and other perceived threats to democracy and/or rock 'n' roll for more than 25 years. Now, Conal sits down with Ted Habte-Gabr to discuss the discrepancies between the social acceptability of art made for museums or galleries and art installed in the public sphere. Ahmanson Building at LACMA , 5905 Wilshire Blvd.
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OPINION
January 16, 2010 | Patt Morrison
I'm always flabbergasted by the foaming fury with which some people regard the painter and guerrilla poster artist Robbie Conal. Over the years, letters-to-the-editor writers have said, "Conal is a cancer on society" and, "He should be behind bars, not in an art gallery." They were mad mostly because of what wasn't in an art gallery. For a quarter of a century, Conal has slapped the powerful in the face by slapping up grotesque caricatures of them in public places. Both George Bushes, Ronald Reagan, Robert McNamara, Al Gore and many more are in Conal's rogues gallery of evildoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2010 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
Plastic lined the floors of the Little Tokyo gallery and globs of brightly colored paint ? neon yellow, poppy orange, Easter egg blue ? were splattered everywhere: in the gallery entranceway, out front on the sidewalk, down the shirts and across the faces of the artists setting up their mural installations. A four-person street art crew ? which goes by, simply, Nomadé ? worked in sync to a mix of punk, hip-hop and thrash music, putting finishing touches on a mural of contemporary Los Angeles anchored by a nine-foot-high Greco-Roman soldier.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2009 | By Scarlet Cheng
Robbie Conal is known for his darkly satiric illustrations of politicians and public figures, often seen as posters slapped up in Los Angeles' public places. When he perceives an abuse of the democratic process, he says, "It's like the thermometer in the cartoon. When the mercury hits above a certain level, above boiling, I pick up a paint brush or a piece of charcoal and I get to work." But another side of him is revealed in the new book "Not Your Typical Political Animal" (Art Attack Press)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1992
Re "Taking a Pasting" (Nov. 19): While attending the opening of the Museum of Contemporary Art in 1986 with several friends who had works in the museum, we noticed posters plastered all around the Temporary. The next evening I returned home to find the garage door open behind my apartment, and there were the paintings and Robbie Conal projecting an image on a canvas. This began a friendship that has lasted since. I have been privileged to watch his rise to prominence first in the mass media and finally within the art community.
OPINION
January 23, 2010
Art and then some Re "An eye for art — and opportunity," Column One, Jan. 19 The Times' article about Jeffrey Deitch, the Museum of Contemporary Art's new director, compared him to Andy Warhol, mentioning his suit and his hangers-on. A better comparison would have been to Warhol's deep and honest cynicism, exemplified by his well-known line: "Art is what you can get away with." Deitch is fortunate that these are troubled economic times. He should have no trouble filling MOCA with many more beer- and urine-soaked shredded phone books for far less money than he installed at his SoHo gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1989 | NICOLE ATKINSON
Nine months after Robbie Conal was ordered by the City of Los Angeles to stop putting up his satirical posters on city property and pay $1,300 for their removal, posters by the self-described "guerrilla artist" have re-emerged plastered on walls from Malibu to downtown, virtually next door to City Hall. This time, Conal and his band of volunteers decided to use "guerrilla etiquette," in putting up the three posters, titled "Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll."
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | Interviewer: Times staff writer Josh Meyer.
Robbie Conal, 45, Venice-based artist-satirist. Claim to fame: Creates the "adversarial portraits" that are posted all over Los Angeles and other major cities from time to time, usually at night and in places they're not supposed to be. Conal (pronounced co-NAL) gained national attention with a portrait of conservative U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), accompanied by the slogan "Artificial Art Official."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1995 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Robbie Conal is known for the political posters he splays across urban settings under cover of night. But now the guerrilla artist's works hang in galleries by day: They're on display at Golden West College. And he's even doing bus shelters. Has the biting provocateur decided to gum the establishment? Has Robbie Conal softened? "I hope, " Conal, 50, answered with a laugh. "I'm not less angry. I'm just older, certainly not wiser, another crotchety old guy.
HOME & GARDEN
October 20, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles poster artist Robbie Conal and his wife, movie and television title designer Deborah Ross, have listed their Gregory Ain-designed home in Mar Vista for $1,149,000. The 1,857-square-foot house is one of the largest in a development of 52 so-called "Modernique Homes," which strove to combine good design and low-cost housing in the postwar years. Conal and Ross were both interested in the Ain homes before they met in 1987. "They were designed with a romantically progressive ideal of everyday social interaction, including contiguous ?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2010 | By Alie Ward
A battery of fluorescent lights blazes in an emptied retail space on Vine Street in Hollywood. Once home to the discount emporium Big Lots, the cavernous building has been gutted of housewares and transformed into Manifest Equality, a temporary art show running through the weekend. Pulling together a large number of works addressing themes of equality, justice, unity and love, the pop-up event intends to spotlight civil rights issues surrounding Proposition 8, which, since passing in 2008, has prohibited marriage between homosexual partners in California.
OPINION
January 23, 2010
Art and then some Re "An eye for art — and opportunity," Column One, Jan. 19 The Times' article about Jeffrey Deitch, the Museum of Contemporary Art's new director, compared him to Andy Warhol, mentioning his suit and his hangers-on. A better comparison would have been to Warhol's deep and honest cynicism, exemplified by his well-known line: "Art is what you can get away with." Deitch is fortunate that these are troubled economic times. He should have no trouble filling MOCA with many more beer- and urine-soaked shredded phone books for far less money than he installed at his SoHo gallery.
OPINION
January 16, 2010 | Patt Morrison
I'm always flabbergasted by the foaming fury with which some people regard the painter and guerrilla poster artist Robbie Conal. Over the years, letters-to-the-editor writers have said, "Conal is a cancer on society" and, "He should be behind bars, not in an art gallery." They were mad mostly because of what wasn't in an art gallery. For a quarter of a century, Conal has slapped the powerful in the face by slapping up grotesque caricatures of them in public places. Both George Bushes, Ronald Reagan, Robert McNamara, Al Gore and many more are in Conal's rogues gallery of evildoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2009 | By Scarlet Cheng
Robbie Conal is known for his darkly satiric illustrations of politicians and public figures, often seen as posters slapped up in Los Angeles' public places. When he perceives an abuse of the democratic process, he says, "It's like the thermometer in the cartoon. When the mercury hits above a certain level, above boiling, I pick up a paint brush or a piece of charcoal and I get to work." But another side of him is revealed in the new book "Not Your Typical Political Animal" (Art Attack Press)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2008 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
The MAN in the two-tone Ray-Ban glasses looked familiar, but Lawrence Shapiro couldn't place him. He was cheerfully holding out a box of Italian cookies to anyone walking through the door of Bergamot Station's Track 16 Gallery -- which was where Shapiro happened to find himself -- and his shock of gray hair and youthful bounce twanged something in Shapiro's memory. The cookie bearer introduced himself as Robbie Conal.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
On a wall in Culver City's Overtones Gallery hangs a series of charcoal on canvas portraits of the famous, ranging from former Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris to Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to Microsoft's Bill Gates. Walking in there is not unlike entering "an evil steakhouse," cracks artist Robbie Conal. "I had to restrain myself from taking a marker and inscribing 'Dear Toots, loved my prime ribs ...
MAGAZINE
July 9, 2000 | LESLEE KOMAIKO
The first-ever Sunset Strip Billboard Awards, sponsored by the West Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, will take place July 13 at the Hyatt West Hollywood Hotel. We talked to the most subversive of its seven judges, Los Angeles guerrilla artist Robbie Conal, who has plastered his provocative posters lampooning everyone from Tammy Faye Bakker to Bill Gates to Kenneth Starr on traffic-light switching boxes and construction-site walls since 1986.
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