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Robbie Robertson

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October 16, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. A new book from the Band's lead guitarist and songwriter Robbie Robertson, “Legends, Icons & Rebels: Music That Changed the World” (Tundra Books, $29), is impressive both for the concisely illuminating text and richly evocative illustrations, both of which are designed to help entice young people into the world of influential pop music. But on a level few kids will be aware of, much less appreciate, it's equally if not more imposing for the accompanying double-CD set featuring tracks from each of the 27 profiled artists, a broad range of heavy hitters including the Beatles, Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, the Beach Boys, Hank Williams, Sam Cooke and others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
On one level, it was no surprise that veteran record company executive Gil Friesen was drawn to the theme of "20 Feet From Stardom," the film about backup singers that won the Oscar for documentary feature Sunday night. Friesen, longtime president of A&M Records, was at a performance by Leonard Cohen in Las Vegas several years ago when he got the idea to explore the question of why support singers who, although tremendously talented, never became stars in their own right. There was a parallel in his own life: Friesen himself was a different breed than high-profile record label heads like Clive Davis, Berry Gordy and Ahmet Ertegun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN
It's no surprise Robertson would name his second solo album after a historic section of New Orleans famed for sensual and ritualistic pursuits. Mixing the earthy and ethereal is the ex-Band leader's stock in trade nowadays. Though conceptual in nature, the album has more to do with Storyville as "a state of mind" than the actual locale--which is described only in one song, "Go Back to Your Woods," a percolating number about New Orleans' dens of sin (backed by local lights the Meters).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. A new book from the Band's lead guitarist and songwriter Robbie Robertson, “Legends, Icons & Rebels: Music That Changed the World” (Tundra Books, $29), is impressive both for the concisely illuminating text and richly evocative illustrations, both of which are designed to help entice young people into the world of influential pop music. But on a level few kids will be aware of, much less appreciate, it's equally if not more imposing for the accompanying double-CD set featuring tracks from each of the 27 profiled artists, a broad range of heavy hitters including the Beatles, Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, the Beach Boys, Hank Williams, Sam Cooke and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | CHRIS WILLMAN
"I wasn't sure I had anything more to say" is not the sort of thing you'd ever expect to hear out of a proud pop star's mouth. And when someone once as prolific as Robbie Robertson--the chief creative force behind the Band in the '60s and early '70s and one of the most influential songwriters in rock history--swears he sat out an entire decade without ever once being struck with the urge to pen another tune, let alone record an album, you tend not to believe him.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Even though such essential artists as David Bowie and the Velvet Underground have been bypassed by Rock and Roll Hall of Fame judges over the years, the Band's election to the Hall in its first year of eligibility was a virtual certainty.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
"I didn't feel old in years; my soul just felt old because of all we had gone through," Robbie Robertson says as he watches a DVD of "The Last Waltz," Martin Scorsese's superb documentary of the Band's farewell concert a quarter-century ago at Winterland in San Francisco. "We wanted to keep recording but quit the grind of the road, which was wearing us down. The plan was for everyone to take time off for some personal projects and then come back refreshed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
Members of the L.A. quartet Dawes have been performing for paying audiences since they were teenagers, so there was no reason John Fogerty could see to go easy on them. "Let's do it one more time," said the veteran roots rocker, standing onstage in jeans and a plaid shirt at the Moody Theater in Austin, Texas. Fogerty had recruited Dawes to back him during a concert at the South by Southwest music festival - part of the lead-in to his upcoming album of all-star collaborations - and in an early-afternoon soundcheck the musicians were running through the Creedence Clearwater Revival song "Someday Never Comes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1985
I trust that all seniors will remember, President Reagan, Vice President Bush, Sen. Wilson and Sen. Bob Dole (R-Kan.) in the next election. ROBBIE ROBERTSON Anaheim
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
Members of the L.A. quartet Dawes have been performing for paying audiences since they were teenagers, so there was no reason John Fogerty could see to go easy on them. "Let's do it one more time," said the veteran roots rocker, standing onstage in jeans and a plaid shirt at the Moody Theater in Austin, Texas. Fogerty had recruited Dawes to back him during a concert at the South by Southwest music festival - part of the lead-in to his upcoming album of all-star collaborations - and in an early-afternoon soundcheck the musicians were running through the Creedence Clearwater Revival song "Someday Never Comes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
There's a track on Robbie Robertson's new album, "How to Become Clairvoyant," that's destined to generate buzz among guitar aficionados, not just for the sincerity with which Robertson pays homage to a litany of the instrument's great practitioners but for the company the celebrated musician chose to help out on it. That song, "The Axman," name-checks many who are no longer living, and one who remains: Robert Johnson, Jimi Hendrix, Django Reinhardt,...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN
"I didn't feel old in years; my soul just felt old because of all we had gone through," Robbie Robertson says as he watches a DVD of "The Last Waltz," Martin Scorsese's superb documentary of the Band's farewell concert a quarter-century ago at Winterland in San Francisco. "We wanted to keep recording but quit the grind of the road, which was wearing us down. The plan was for everyone to take time off for some personal projects and then come back refreshed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1998 | MARC WEINGARTEN
Say what you will about Robertson's solo output, he certainly hasn't played it safe. Rather than trot out endless variations on the brilliant body of work he wrote for the Band in the late '60s and early '70s, the guitarist crafted soaring, fastidiously produced rock reminiscent of Peter Gabriel on his 1987 self-titled debut, then explored New Orleans' complex musical and spiritual heritage on 1991's "Storyville."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1994 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Make a recording of Native American music?" says Robbie Robertson with a laugh. "Are you kidding? "If I had called the record company five years ago and told them I was going to do what I've just done, they would've said, 'I'm sorry, we've got a bad connection here. Did you just say something really weird?' " But what Robertson has, in fact, just done--release an album of his music for TBS' upcoming six-hour series "The Native Americans" (scheduled for Monday, Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1994 | Steve Hochman
African Burundi drummers . . . Irish harpists . . . Spanish monks. Sounds from just about every nook of the globe have been brought to us as the world music boom continues. So what exotic locale will yield the next discovery? Try our own back yard. Four major labels currently have projects built around music of Native Americans, the most visible being Robbie Robertson's upcoming soundtrack for a TBS television documentary series. The six-hour series, "The Native Americans," premieres on Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1988
First a swingin' Laker Girl. Then a hot choreographer--for everyone from Janet Jackson to George Michael to Eddie Murphy (for his new film, "Coming to America.") What will Paula Abdul do next? How 'bout try her hand at pop stardom. Abdul's vocal talents will be on display June 15, when her debut album, "Forever Your Girl," hits the stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987 | ROBERT HILBURN
* * * 1/2 ROBBIE ROBERTSON. "Robbie Robertson." Geffen. As chief architect of the Band, songwriter-guitarist Robertson made some of the most distinguished and affecting music of the late '60s and early '70s--music that explored elements of the American character against a backdrop of country, folk and blues influences as timeless and majestic as a redwood forest.
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