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Robert A Cook

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1989 | From Religious News Service
The Rev. Robert A. Cook, chancellor of The King's College in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., and speaker on "The King's Hour" radio program, has been named interim executive director of National Religious Broadcasters. He succeeds the Rev. Ben Armstrong, who retired Sept. 1 after 23 years at the organization's administrative helm. Cook served as president of the broadcasters' organization from 1985 to 1988 and is also a past president of the National Assn. of Evangelicals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1989 | From Religious News Service
The Rev. Robert A. Cook, chancellor of The King's College in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y., and speaker on "The King's Hour" radio program, has been named interim executive director of National Religious Broadcasters. He succeeds the Rev. Ben Armstrong, who retired Sept. 1 after 23 years at the organization's administrative helm. Cook served as president of the broadcasters' organization from 1985 to 1988 and is also a past president of the National Assn. of Evangelicals.
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NEWS
August 12, 1987 | Associated Press
A group of religious broadcasters Tuesday developed a code of ethics for its members that would make public an annual audit and include a device to expel ministries that do not follow responsible conduct. The proposal will be presented to a special meeting of the 90-member board of directors of the National Assn. of Religious Broadcasters in Chicago on Sept. 11, said NRB President Robert A. Cook.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Crouch, founder and president of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, has resigned from the National Religious Broadcasters, citing "lying, trumped-up charges (that) were aimed at the heart" of his 24-hour-a-day Christian programming service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2000 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One charity in Los Angeles has had a powerful ally to squeeze contributions from prospective donors. That charity is the District Attorney Crime Prevention Foundation, started by Dist. Atty. Gil Garcetti. From 1994 to 1998, according to foundation and court records, deputy district attorneys under Garcetti negotiated with 51 defendants who made contributions to the foundation as a condition of settling their criminal and, in a few instances, civil cases before trials.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a prosecutor eager to share damning evidence, state Rep. George E. Terwilleger shoves a grainy Polaroid across his desk. Angelenos might strain their eyes trying to spot some irregularity in this shot of a government building and a placard reading, "Department of Human Services-- El Departamento de Servicios Humanos. " But Terwilleger sees such signs of the times as proof of multicultural chaos to come.
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