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Robert A Fildes

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BUSINESS
August 17, 1990 | LINDA DARNELL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cetus Corp.'s outspoken president and chief executive, Robert A. Fildes, resigned Thursday, less than a month after a Food and Drug Administration panel recommended against approval of the company's crucial anti-cancer drug. Chairman Ronald E. Cape, who relinquished the CEO title to Fildes in 1986, was again named to the post, the Emeryville, Calif.-based biotechnology company said in a statement. Also, Hollings C. Renton, chief operating officer, was given the additional title of president.
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BUSINESS
August 17, 1990 | LINDA DARNELL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cetus Corp.'s outspoken president and chief executive, Robert A. Fildes, resigned Thursday, less than a month after a Food and Drug Administration panel recommended against approval of the company's crucial anti-cancer drug. Chairman Ronald E. Cape, who relinquished the CEO title to Fildes in 1986, was again named to the post, the Emeryville, Calif.-based biotechnology company said in a statement. Also, Hollings C. Renton, chief operating officer, was given the additional title of president.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 1986
Cetus Corp., a leader in the biotechnology field, is expected to announce today that Robert A. Fildes, president and chief operating officer, will be given the additional title of chief executive. Cetus Chairman Ronald E. Cape also has held the chief executive title since he co-founded the firm in 1971. Cape, considered the dean of the biotechnology industry, is expected to remain with the Emeryville-based company.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1986 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS
As expected, Cetus Corp. said Thursday that it has named President Robert A. Fildes to the additional position of chief executive. Ronald E. Cape, Cetus co-founder and chairman, also had been chief executive. Cape will remain as chairman. Fildes, 47, joined Cetus in December, 1982, as president and chief operating officer. As Cape became increasingly active in industry organizations and issues, Fildes has assumed more and more of the day-to-day responsibilities for the No. 2 biotechnology firm.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1988 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Amgen Inc. and Cetus Corp., two of the nation's leading biotechnology companies, announced Monday that they settled a patent dispute over the anti-cancer drug interleukin-2. The drug, better known as IL-2, is a naturally occurring protein and immune system booster that has been found in clinical tests to turn a patient's white blood cells into tumor-killing cells. Amgen and Cetus scientists developed different forms of the drug.
BUSINESS
July 31, 1990 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Food and Drug Administration panel Monday dealt a blow to loss-weary Cetus Corp. when it postponed a decision on the firm's application to market Proleukin, its costliest and most important product, to treat kidney cancer. The panel, whose recommendations are almost always accepted by the FDA, said it needed more time to review data that Cetus submitted as late as last Friday and would probably request additional meetings between Cetus officials and FDA staff.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1990 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thomas G. Wiggans remembers that day in February when he tried to nudge fellow industry leaders over to his side of an issue. Directors of the Industrial Biotechnology Assn. were meeting at the Pier 66 resort in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., and Wiggans was calling for changes in the Orphan Drug Act. "I'm sure it was sunny when the meeting began and cloudy by the time it was over," said Wiggans, president of Serono Laboratories of Norwell, Mass.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1985 | KATHLEEN DAY, Times Staff Writer
For centuries, the people of Mexico have rubbed their hands and feet with the root of a scraggly herb called barbasco in the belief it would heal wounds. Then, in the mid-1940s, the plant found a more lucrative application: Syntex Corp. plucked it from folklore medicine for use as a cheap source of a substance needed to make sex hormones.
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