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Robert A G Monks

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BUSINESS
May 9, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Robert A. G. Monks concedes that his bid for a seat on the Sears, Roebuck & Co. board is a long shot, but even if he loses today's proxy contest, he hopes that his campaign won't have been in vain. Monks says he wants people to remember his campaign "as the point when owners recognized the need for genuinely independent directors." The former Labor Department official heads Institutional Shareholder Partners Inc.
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BUSINESS
May 9, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Robert A. G. Monks concedes that his bid for a seat on the Sears, Roebuck & Co. board is a long shot, but even if he loses today's proxy contest, he hopes that his campaign won't have been in vain. Monks says he wants people to remember his campaign "as the point when owners recognized the need for genuinely independent directors." The former Labor Department official heads Institutional Shareholder Partners Inc.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shareholder activist Robert A. G. Monks' campaign for a seat on the board of struggling retailer Sears, Roebuck & Co. got a strong boost Wednesday when an influential California investment fund announced that it would support him. The fund--the California Public Employees' Retirement System, commonly known as CalPERS--is the first institutional investor to publicly back Monks.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1991 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shareholder activist Robert A. G. Monks' campaign for a seat on the board of struggling retailer Sears, Roebuck & Co. got a strong boost Wednesday when an influential California investment fund announced that it would support him. The fund--the California Public Employees' Retirement System, commonly known as CalPERS--is the first institutional investor to publicly back Monks.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1992 | From Associated Press
Sears, Roebuck & Co. stockholders turned aside challenges to the company's management Thursday, rejecting five dissident resolutions and reelecting three members of the retail and financial service conglomerate's board. But the dissident shareholders claimed victory, noting that they drew more than 40% of the votes on two proposals at Sears' annual meeting.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, Time Staff Writer
Seven banks have each agreed to put up $1 billion in loans for Paramount Communications' proposed takeover of Time Inc., bringing total loan commitments for the bid to $8 billion of the $14 billion that is needed, Paramount said Thursday. While many Wall Street observers have believed that Paramount could raise the money, the commitments strengthen the company's hand when Paramount and Time argue their case before the Delaware courts in two weeks. Paramount has challenged the legality of Time's plan to acquire Warner Communications, contending that it was intended solely to block Paramount's bid. Time has bitterly fought Paramount's offer since it was made June 7 and sweetened last week.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1988 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The curious thing about money is that people treat it so respectfully. When Colgate or Procter & Gamble bring out a wash day miracle--new, improved Fab or Tide--it is seen for what it is, a marketing gimmick to wake up customers. But when Wall Street comes up with a new scheme for its brokers to wake up customers, it's treated as a great financial innovation. That's the way it was last week with unbundled stock units, the latest gimmick dreamed up by Shearson Lehman Hutton.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2002 | James Flanigan
The collapse of Enron Corp., whose executives last week either pleaded the 5th Amendment or offered testimony to Congress that strained credulity, has provoked demands for reform among angry investors, politicians and the public. So far, talk of reform has concentrated mainly on accounting. But soon it will turn to money--the big money that Enron executives pocketed while the ship went down and employees were hurt.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Jail terms, fines and probation may not be suitable ways to punish corporations that commit crimes, but a federal commission that debated the issue in Pasadena last week has agreed to study another method: punishing company directors. The suggestion, proposed to the U.S. Sentencing Commission last Friday during its final hearing at the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2004 | Claudia Eller, Sallie Hofmeister and Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writers
Toward the end of Wednesday's marathon shareholder meeting, Walt Disney Co. chief Michael Eisner found himself growing hoarse. "I've got no voice," he said. A few hours later, the same could be said of many Disney shareholders: It seemed as though they had no voice either -- at least in terms of pushing the company in a new direction.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rise in activism by pension funds and other institutional shareholders has spawned a new cottage industry that provides information, analysis and even advocacy guidance to big investors on issues ranging from apartheid to mergers. The firms run the gamut from the impartial, nonprofit Investor Responsibility Research Center (IRRC) in Washington to Providence Capital Inc.
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