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Robert A Haugen

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BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Professor of Finance, UCI Graduate School of Management Robert A. Haugen's market theories run counter to conventional stock-market wisdom. In his soon-to-be-released book, "The New Finance," he argues that the highest-risk stocks can be expected to produce the lowest returns to investors over time and the lowest-risk stocks, the highest returns.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Professor of Finance, UCI Graduate School of Management Robert A. Haugen's market theories run counter to conventional stock-market wisdom. In his soon-to-be-released book, "The New Finance," he argues that the highest-risk stocks can be expected to produce the lowest returns to investors over time and the lowest-risk stocks, the highest returns.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no coincidence that UC Irvine professor Robert A. Haugen delivered the keynote speech at the Southern California Growth Stock Conference Thursday. Haugen, an investment-markets specialist and author of "The Incredible January Effect," is a firm believer in the investment value of smaller, publicly traded companies. His book argues that small companies' stocks pay higher investment returns than large companies' stocks and that small stocks show their biggest gains in January.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1988 | Bill Sing
Nothing is a sure thing in the stock market. But one investment pattern that has been pretty dependable over the years is the so-called January effect, although taking advantage of it may be trickier this year. The effect is the tendency of small-company stocks to outperform big-company stocks in January, due to year-end tactics of money managers and tax-loss selling.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1989 | BILL SING
Some things happen with regularity. Old Faithful erupting. Congress changing tax laws. New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner firing managers. And you can almost always count on the January effect. That is the tendency of small-company stocks to outperform big-company stocks in January, due largely to year-end moves by institutional investors. Investors who buy small stocks in late-December and sell in mid-January often do well. The effect works 80% to 90% of the time, contends Robert A.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1987 | BILL SING
Looking for a good way to play the stock market in the next few weeks? One possibility: Buy small stocks toward the end of this month. Under a phenomenon called the "January effect," many academic researchers and market analysts have shown that smaller, riskier stocks generally outperform blue chip issues in the first two or three weeks of a new year.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1990 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no coincidence that UC Irvine professor Robert A. Haugen delivered the keynote speech at the Southern California Growth Stock Conference Thursday. Haugen, an investment-markets specialist and author of "The Incredible January Effect," is a firm believer in the investment value of smaller, publicly traded companies. His book argues that small companies' stocks pay higher investment returns than large companies' stocks and that small stocks show their biggest gains in January.
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