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May 10, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Robert Anson Heinlein, considered by many to be the most influential author of science fiction since H. G. Wells, is dead at the age of 80, it was reported Monday. Heinlein, who had suffered from heart ailments and emphysema for a decade, died in his sleep over the weekend at his Carmel home, Charles Brown, publisher of the science-fiction magazine Locus and a friend of the family, told United Press International.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010 | By Ed Park, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"I am submitting the enclosed short story 'LIFE-LINE' for either 'Astounding' or 'Unknown,'" Robert A. Heinlein wrote to editor John Campbell in 1939, "because I am not sure which policy it fits the better. " The former magazine published science fiction, the latter fantasy. Heinlein's short story ? the first he had attempted professionally, at age 31 ? concerns a machine that can predict when a person will die. That he sold this neophyte production, on first submission, to a top pulp editor (kicking off an intense friendship and correspondence)
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NEWS
March 5, 1991 | ROBIN ABCARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you grok grokking, then you may already know that the original, uncut version of Robert A. Heinlein's "Stranger in a Strange Land," one of the most famous and controversial science-fiction novels published in this galaxy, has reappeared on the shelves of the third planet's bookstores in celebration of its 30th anniversary.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
He was a onetime utopian socialist who became an assertive right-winger, a libertarian nudist with a military-hardware fetish, a cold warrior who penned an Age of Aquarius sensation with a hero who preached free love. He won admiration from Ronald Reagan, who enlisted his ideas in his "Star Wars" missile shield, and Charles Manson, who was captured with the novel "Stranger in a Strange Land" in his backpack. He predicted the European Union and invented the water bed. But Robert A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
He was a onetime utopian socialist who became an assertive right-winger, a libertarian nudist with a military-hardware fetish, a cold warrior who penned an Age of Aquarius sensation with a hero who preached free love. He won admiration from Ronald Reagan, who enlisted his ideas in his "Star Wars" missile shield, and Charles Manson, who was captured with the novel "Stranger in a Strange Land" in his backpack. He predicted the European Union and invented the water bed. But Robert A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010 | By Ed Park, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"I am submitting the enclosed short story 'LIFE-LINE' for either 'Astounding' or 'Unknown,'" Robert A. Heinlein wrote to editor John Campbell in 1939, "because I am not sure which policy it fits the better. " The former magazine published science fiction, the latter fantasy. Heinlein's short story ? the first he had attempted professionally, at age 31 ? concerns a machine that can predict when a person will die. That he sold this neophyte production, on first submission, to a top pulp editor (kicking off an intense friendship and correspondence)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2007
HAVING just become the only writer ever to collaborate with Robert Heinlein on a novel, I feel an obligation to compliment Scott Timberg on "Robert Heinlein's Future May Be Past" [Dec. 9]. He did a very nearly perfect job. But not quite perfect. Although every opinion expressed by Timberg is malicious nonsense -- and he neglects to mention recent news items related to Mr.
BOOKS
February 2, 1986 | MICHAEL CARROLL
THE CAT WHO WALKS THROUGH WALLS by Robert A. Heinlein (Putnam's: $17.95). This is a book that will neither particularly disappoint nor surprise those readers familiar with Robert Heinlein's style. It is told with an excess of that juvenile flippancy which runs through most (though not all) of Heinlein's science fiction. Col. Colin Campbell, the first-person narrator, never ceases his efforts to be cute, thus explaining the otherwise inexplicable subtitle of this volume, "A Comedy of Manners."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2000
Re the cover story on James Cameron and his new TV series "Dark Angel" ("Hey, It's a Small World--and He's Adjusting," by Greg Braxton, Sept. 24): In the mid-1980s, author Harlan Ellison made some legal rumblings in Cameron's direction concerning the similarity between the story line of "The Terminator" and stories Ellison had written years earlier. As a result, video versions of the film contain an added line in the credits "acknowledging" the work of Ellison. Now comes the news that "Dark Angel" will follow the adventures of a young, "genetically enhanced" superhuman female, working as a messenger in a future America that has undergone social breakdown.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | ROBIN ABCARIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you grok grokking, then you may already know that the original, uncut version of Robert A. Heinlein's "Stranger in a Strange Land," one of the most famous and controversial science-fiction novels published in this galaxy, has reappeared on the shelves of the third planet's bookstores in celebration of its 30th anniversary.
NEWS
May 10, 1988 | From a Times Staff Writer
Robert Anson Heinlein, considered by many to be the most influential author of science fiction since H. G. Wells, is dead at the age of 80, it was reported Monday. Heinlein, who had suffered from heart ailments and emphysema for a decade, died in his sleep over the weekend at his Carmel home, Charles Brown, publisher of the science-fiction magazine Locus and a friend of the family, told United Press International.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2009 | times staff and wire reports
Edward D. Cartier, 94, whose illustrations graced "The Shadow" and numerous other science fiction and mystery publications in a career that spanned several decades, died Dec. 25 at his home in Ramsey, N.J., said his son, Dean Cartier. The elder Cartier had Parkinson's disease. Cartier's art appeared in works by such authors as Robert A. Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, but he is perhaps best known for the hundreds of illustrations he did for "The Shadow" in the 1930s and '40s. Written by Walter B. Gibson, "The Shadow" novels appeared in pulp magazines and detailed the exploits of a mysterious black-attired crime fighter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You might be wondering what we need with another body snatchers movie when there's already been one official "Body Snatchers" remake released this year. But "Robert A. Heinlein's the Puppet Masters"--based on a 1951 story by guess-who that predates even Jack Finney's literary mother of all pods--is a kinder, gentler and more action-oriented sort of "B.S." It's perky paranoia.
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