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Robert A Pastor

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NEWS
April 4, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
The summer of 1980 was dry in Mexico. Crops and livestock died. Pressured to explain the disaster, Mexico's weather forecasting service chief suggested a U.S. hurricane-tracking aircraft might be the culprit. Checking on that idea, a university researcher reported the only explanation for Mexico's stolen rain was "the deliberate and effective program carried out by the United States." Newspapers across Mexico went on a three-week spree of anti-American attacks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014
Robert A. Pastor, an influential scholar and policymaker who spent decades working for better inter-American relations and democracy and free elections in the Western Hemisphere, died Wednesday at his home in Washington, D.C., after a three-year battle with cancer. He was 66. His death was announced by American University, where Pastor was a professor in the School of International Service. Pastor had been President Carter's national security adviser for Latin America and the Caribbean.
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NEWS
February 1, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yielding to the determined opposition of Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), President Clinton on Tuesday abandoned his nomination of Robert Pastor, a close associate of former President Jimmy Carter, to be ambassador to Panama. For Pastor, the withdrawal ends eight months in diplomatic limbo.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yielding to the determined opposition of Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), President Clinton on Tuesday abandoned his nomination of Robert Pastor, a close associate of former President Jimmy Carter, to be ambassador to Panama. For Pastor, the withdrawal ends eight months in diplomatic limbo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014
Robert A. Pastor, an influential scholar and policymaker who spent decades working for better inter-American relations and democracy and free elections in the Western Hemisphere, died Wednesday at his home in Washington, D.C., after a three-year battle with cancer. He was 66. His death was announced by American University, where Pastor was a professor in the School of International Service. Pastor had been President Carter's national security adviser for Latin America and the Caribbean.
BOOKS
January 15, 1989 | Abraham F. Lowenthal, Lowenthal, a professor of international relations at USC and executive director of the Washington-based organization Inter-American Dialogue, is author of "Partners in Conflict: The United States and Latin America" (Johns Hopkins University Press). and
No country affects the United States as much as Mexico. No other country is more pervasively influenced by the United States, in turn. Few bilateral relationships in the world are more complex, or more difficult to manage. Millions of persons engage in an intricate web of transactions between Mexico and the United States, most of them legal, but many not. U.S. corporations and banks have invested billions of dollars in Mexico; Mexicans have stashed billions in U.S. bank accounts and real estate; and Mexican workers in the United States send $2 billion a year to relatives at home.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- In remarks to a prominent gathering of religious conservatives, Mitt Romney vowed to be a president who shared their “commitment to conservative principles,” and said a strong economy was rooted in “strong communities and strong families.”   Romney addressed the annual Values Voter Summit in Washington via a recorded video message, surprising attendees who had not expected to hear from the Republican nominee. His running mate, Paul D. Ryan had spoken to the gathering just hours earlier before heading to a campaign stop in battleground Virginia.
BOOKS
October 1, 1989
THE QUEEN OF THE DAMNED by Anne Rice (Ballantine: $5.95). Rice breathes life into the majestic Akasha, who awakens from a 6,000-year slumber to challenge Lestat, in this third installment of the vampire chronicles. FINAL FLIGHT by Stephens Coonts (Dell: $5.95). Capt. Jake Grafton of "The Flight of the Intruder" transfers to an aircraft carrier stalked by Arabs seeking its nuclear weapons. THE ANNA PAPERS by Ellen Gilchrist (Little, Brown: $8.95).
WORLD
November 8, 2005 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Monday endorsed the idea of widening the Panama Canal but rejected Panama's request that the U.S. remove thousands of unexploded munitions it left behind when it turned over control of the waterway in 1999. The ordnance is strewn across jungle firing ranges, including a five-mile strip on either side of the canal. Separately, on the island of San Jose, the U.S. military dropped tens of thousands of chemical munitions in training and testing missions the 1940s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1999
Peace! As a pastor, I have not been looking forward to the year 2000, precisely because of the reaction outlined in Column One ("The Year of Believing in Prophecies," March 31). All those who are so intent on studying the prophecies forget that Jesus said: "You do not know the day nor the hour" (Matthew 24:42). No amount of research, not even hundreds of hours, is going to change that. Besides, the year 2000 has nothing to do with Scripture--there are no prophecies about it at all. Instead of trying to determine "the day and the hour," Christians should be looking for the coming of Christ this day, in the poor and distressed.
NEWS
April 4, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
The summer of 1980 was dry in Mexico. Crops and livestock died. Pressured to explain the disaster, Mexico's weather forecasting service chief suggested a U.S. hurricane-tracking aircraft might be the culprit. Checking on that idea, a university researcher reported the only explanation for Mexico's stolen rain was "the deliberate and effective program carried out by the United States." Newspapers across Mexico went on a three-week spree of anti-American attacks.
BOOKS
January 15, 1989 | Abraham F. Lowenthal, Lowenthal, a professor of international relations at USC and executive director of the Washington-based organization Inter-American Dialogue, is author of "Partners in Conflict: The United States and Latin America" (Johns Hopkins University Press). and
No country affects the United States as much as Mexico. No other country is more pervasively influenced by the United States, in turn. Few bilateral relationships in the world are more complex, or more difficult to manage. Millions of persons engage in an intricate web of transactions between Mexico and the United States, most of them legal, but many not. U.S. corporations and banks have invested billions of dollars in Mexico; Mexicans have stashed billions in U.S. bank accounts and real estate; and Mexican workers in the United States send $2 billion a year to relatives at home.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
The head of the Southern Baptists condemned homosexuality from the podium Tuesday as gay rights protesters shouting slogans marched through the convention hall and into the arms of police. Twelve protesters were arrested inside the hall, and 38 more were taken into custody outside, where riot police stood near the main doorway. The protesters who infiltrated the annual meeting of the nation's largest Protestant denomination were charged with intimidation and trespassing. "Stop killing us!
WORLD
January 20, 2010 | By Paul Richter
When Haiti was gripped by crisis in 1994, President Clinton sent troops to restore its exiled president to power, organized a $2.6-billion international rescue program and declared the island a top priority of his administration. "We should work this way whenever we can," he later wrote in his memoir of the international effort. Yet, by the end of his term, the Clinton administration's interest in Haiti had waned and its patience had worn out. Clinton ordered a halt to most direct U.S. aid, a step some experts say inflicted lasting damage on the hemisphere's poorest country.
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