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Robert Abel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Abel, the computer animation and graphics guru who used multimedia to create award-winning commercials, films and classroom educational materials, has died. He was 64. Abel, credited with spearheading a transition in network television advertising, died Sunday in Los Angeles of complications following a heart attack five weeks ago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2004 | Robert Abele
Doctor Octopus The mad scientist ("Spider-Man 2"): He's Doctor Octopus (Alfred Molina), also Dr. Otto Octavius, or if you're on intimate terms, Doc Ock. He's a celebrated "fusion" scientist whose experimentation on a body harness with tentacles goes -- how else? -- horribly wrong. His nemesis: Spider-Man (Tobey Maguire), also a victim of twisted science -- or twisted nature, really, in the form of a radioactive arachnid bite -- but who goes after criminals instead of whining.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
There are bitter and sweet ironies in the multimillion-dollar project that Hollywood filmmaker Robert Abel is directing in the back reaches of the empty and once elegant Ambassador Hotel grounds. The Ambassador is past tense. Abel's work is emphatically future. He has turned the leased Bungalow H into a central point for an international multimedia history project that began last July. Abel's year-old Synapse Technologies, Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Abel, the computer animation and graphics guru who used multimedia to create award-winning commercials, films and classroom educational materials, has died. He was 64. Abel, credited with spearheading a transition in network television advertising, died Sunday in Los Angeles of complications following a heart attack five weeks ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2000
Robert M. Abell, 76, president of the A.N. Abell Auction Co., and former president and treasurer of the Southern California Auctioneers Assn. Born in Los Angeles, Abell graduated from USC with a degree in business in 1949 after serving in the U.S. Army medical corps. While running the family business started by his father in 1916, Abell donated his time to more than 1,000 charity auctions, raising millions of dollars for worthy causes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
As the camera pans through a marble room, a statue of a flute player, carved from the same beige marble, sways in time to his own music. As if fulfilling King Midas' dream, the flutist and the other statues in the room turn to gold, glittering in the light. Suddenly, a white ball appears and fills the screen with the familiar brush-stroke logo of The Wave, KTWV-FM (94.7).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2004 | Robert Abele
Doctor Octopus The mad scientist ("Spider-Man 2"): He's Doctor Octopus (Alfred Molina), also Dr. Otto Octavius, or if you're on intimate terms, Doc Ock. He's a celebrated "fusion" scientist whose experimentation on a body harness with tentacles goes -- how else? -- horribly wrong. His nemesis: Spider-Man (Tobey Maguire), also a victim of twisted science -- or twisted nature, really, in the form of a radioactive arachnid bite -- but who goes after criminals instead of whining.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1986
Ronald Hein has been named vice president-marketing administration for the Motion Picture Group of Paramount Pictures Corp., Los Angeles. Hein was formerly chief financial officer of Robert Abel & Associates.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1985
Seven persons will receive Annie awards for advances in film animation during the International Animated Film Society's 13th annual awards presentation at the Bel-Air Country Club on Nov. 15.. The recipients will be Robert Abel, Preston Blair, Joe Grant, John Halas, Sterling Holloway, Jim Macdonald and Phil Monroe. In addition, Ben Washam will receive the Winsor McCay Trophy for lifetime achievement as an animator. Information: (213) 466-3421.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2000
Robert M. Abell, 76, president of the A.N. Abell Auction Co., and former president and treasurer of the Southern California Auctioneers Assn. Born in Los Angeles, Abell graduated from USC with a degree in business in 1949 after serving in the U.S. Army medical corps. While running the family business started by his father in 1916, Abell donated his time to more than 1,000 charity auctions, raising millions of dollars for worthy causes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1991 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
There are bitter and sweet ironies in the multimillion-dollar project that Hollywood filmmaker Robert Abel is directing in the back reaches of the empty and once elegant Ambassador Hotel grounds. The Ambassador is past tense. Abel's work is emphatically future. He has turned the leased Bungalow H into a central point for an international multimedia history project that began last July. Abel's year-old Synapse Technologies, Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Florida Circuit Court Judge Robert C. Abel said Wednesday that an attorney for the mother of Johnny Carson's illegitimate granddaughter may come to Los Angeles and question the entertainer about financial support given the child's father, Chris Carson. Abel added that Carson fils might have to bear the travel costs for the attorney if Tanena Love Green wins her suit for more child support.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1992 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A city attorney investigator who helps defend San Diego police officers being sued could be prosecuted himself for hitting a detective at a topless bar in Kearny Mesa, police said. Investigator Rodney Tompkins hit a vice detective as the detective tried to escort Tompkins and his companions from the Pure Platinum club on Kearny Mesa Road, said Sgt. M. Foreman of the San Diego Police Department. Tompkins was attending a bachelor's party when the group was asked to leave the club about 11 p.m.
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