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Robert Aguilar

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June 14, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
Federal Judge Robert P. Aguilar always has been something of a maverick and, like all mavericks, his actions often have set tongues wagging. Aguilar's friendships and financial dealings with felons led largely to his racketeering indictment on Tuesday. But even before these relationships drew the FBI's attention, Aguilar had left controversy in his wake. President Jimmy Carter appointed Aguilar to the U.S. District Court in San Jose in 1980, at the request of Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.
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NEWS
June 25, 1996 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government Monday dropped its 7-year-old criminal prosecution of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar--the first federal judge ever indicted in California--in exchange for Aguilar's immediate resignation from the bench. In January, a federal appeals court paved the way for the agreement by overturning Aguilar's sole remaining conviction, on charges of disclosing wiretap information. The U.S. Justice Department had until Monday to decide whether to appeal to the Supreme Court.
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NEWS
March 6, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Testifying in his own defense Monday, U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar said the activities that led to his indictment on racketeering and corruption charges were actually innocent efforts to help friends, relatives and acquaintances. Aguilar, the first federal judge ever charged with racketeering, said he had a long historyof offering advice to anyone who asked for it, including law students he hardly knew. He said that this helpfulness, not any criminal intent, is behind his problems.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Tuesday reversed the convictions of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar for obstructing justice and leaking word to an aging mobster that he was being wiretapped by the Justice Department. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Aguilar's conduct did not violate the federal laws he was charged with breaking. Unless the Supreme Court overrules the 9th Circuit decision, the charges against the San Jose judge will be dismissed.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors call him the "defendant," charged with the serious crimes of racketeering and obstruction of justice. Defense lawyers call him "judge." With his wire-rim glasses, salt-and-pepper hair and well-tailored suits, Robert P. Aguilar looks like a senior partner of a high-powered law firm. But today, the 58-year-old jurist will become the first sitting federal judge in the nation to go on trial on racketeering charges. He also is the only federal judge based in California ever to face trial.
NEWS
August 23, 1989
U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar goes on trial in San Francisco Feb. 1 on eight criminal charges, including obstruction of justice and racketeering. The trial date was set by U.S. District Judge Louis Bechtle, a Philadelphia jurist specially chosen to hear the case.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge has refused to dismiss racketeering and conspiracy charges against U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar, ordering his trial to begin on Friday as scheduled. Aguilar is the first federal jurist ever charged with racketeering, a law usually intended to fight organized crime. The judge, who sits in San Jose, is also charged with conspiracy, obstructing justice and disclosure of wiretap information to a self-proclaimed mob assassin.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From United Press International
A prosecutor portrayed indicted federal judge Robert Aguilar in closing arguments Wednesday as a liar and a behind-the-scenes manipulator who attempted to influence other judges in criminal cases. But Patrick Hallinan, Aguilar's attorney, in his summation accused the prosecutors of using "lurid language" filled with "slander and smear" tactics to attack the judge with charges "when they knew there was no truth to it." "Don't let the federal bench lose a man of this quality," he said.
NEWS
May 2, 1990
In response to your editorial "Now Who Will Indict RICO?" (April 25): You state "By going to trial, Michael Milken would have risked absurdly long prison sentences for himself and his brother. . . ." Absurdly long? What is an absurdly long prison sentence for bilking millions of people out of billions of dollars? I don't know the answer, but I can tell you my definition of an absurdly short prison sentence; the 30 months that everyone is predicting Milken will serve.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Lawyers for U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar asked Tuesday for dismissal of the racketeering charge against him, saying it fails to allege bribery or any other financial motive. In papers submitted to a federal court, Aguilar's lawyers made a multi-front attack on the racketeering charge, the first against a federal judge. They also sought dismissal of three of the other seven charges against Aguilar.
NEWS
November 2, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar was sentenced Thursday to six months in prison for obstruction of justice for lying to FBI agents and leaking word to an aging mobster that he was being wiretapped. U.S. District Judge Louis Bechtle of Philadelphia imposed far less prison time than prosecutors had sought. But he told Aguilar that an obstruction of justice conviction "by a judge, no less, is a chilling message indeed."
NEWS
May 2, 1990
In response to your editorial "Now Who Will Indict RICO?" (April 25): You state "By going to trial, Michael Milken would have risked absurdly long prison sentences for himself and his brother. . . ." Absurdly long? What is an absurdly long prison sentence for bilking millions of people out of billions of dollars? I don't know the answer, but I can tell you my definition of an absurdly short prison sentence; the 30 months that everyone is predicting Milken will serve.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | From United Press International
A prosecutor portrayed indicted federal judge Robert Aguilar in closing arguments Wednesday as a liar and a behind-the-scenes manipulator who attempted to influence other judges in criminal cases. But Patrick Hallinan, Aguilar's attorney, in his summation accused the prosecutors of using "lurid language" filled with "slander and smear" tactics to attack the judge with charges "when they knew there was no truth to it." "Don't let the federal bench lose a man of this quality," he said.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Testifying in his own defense Monday, U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar said the activities that led to his indictment on racketeering and corruption charges were actually innocent efforts to help friends, relatives and acquaintances. Aguilar, the first federal judge ever charged with racketeering, said he had a long historyof offering advice to anyone who asked for it, including law students he hardly knew. He said that this helpfulness, not any criminal intent, is behind his problems.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In opening statements Thursday in the trial of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar, prosecutors contended that he sought to use his position to sway fellow judges, while Aguilar's lawyer charged a "reactionary" federal Administration targeted him because of his liberal rulings. Prosecutor Ralph D. Martin said Aguilar, appointed to the federal bench in 1980, engaged in an eight-year "pattern of racketeering."
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors call him the "defendant," charged with the serious crimes of racketeering and obstruction of justice. Defense lawyers call him "judge." With his wire-rim glasses, salt-and-pepper hair and well-tailored suits, Robert P. Aguilar looks like a senior partner of a high-powered law firm. But today, the 58-year-old jurist will become the first sitting federal judge in the nation to go on trial on racketeering charges. He also is the only federal judge based in California ever to face trial.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal judge has refused to dismiss racketeering and conspiracy charges against U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar, ordering his trial to begin on Friday as scheduled. Aguilar is the first federal jurist ever charged with racketeering, a law usually intended to fight organized crime. The judge, who sits in San Jose, is also charged with conspiracy, obstructing justice and disclosure of wiretap information to a self-proclaimed mob assassin.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Lawyers for U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar asked Tuesday for dismissal of the racketeering charge against him, saying it fails to allege bribery or any other financial motive. In papers submitted to a federal court, Aguilar's lawyers made a multi-front attack on the racketeering charge, the first against a federal judge. They also sought dismissal of three of the other seven charges against Aguilar.
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