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Robert Allen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000
Robert Allen, 73, composer of popular songs in the 1950s and '60s, most notably works performed by Johnny Mathis. With his songwriting partner, lyricist Al Stillman, Allen wrote "Chances Are" and "It's Not for Me to Say," which were major hits for Mathis. They also wrote several songs that were hits in the mid-1950s for the Four Lads, including "Moments to Remember," "Enchanted Island" and "There's Only One of You."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2000
Robert Allen, 73, composer of popular songs in the 1950s and '60s, most notably works performed by Johnny Mathis. With his songwriting partner, lyricist Al Stillman, Allen wrote "Chances Are" and "It's Not for Me to Say," which were major hits for Mathis. They also wrote several songs that were hits in the mid-1950s for the Four Lads, including "Moments to Remember," "Enchanted Island" and "There's Only One of You."
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SPORTS
June 10, 1992 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The calls from boxing promoters and managers average about six a week, and Jimmy Troy says they all want the same thing--a piece of Robert Allen, his 23-year-old Camp Pendleton Marine. Troy, Allen's adviser of six months, said the phone in his Stamford, Conn., office began ringing after Allen won the U.S. championships in February by knocking out all six of his opponents in the 156-pound division. "The vultures were really out there," said Troy, who played in the NHL for eight seasons.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | MARTA W. ALDRICH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert Allen reads Homer's "Iliad" for fun before flipping on a rerun of "The Beverly Hillbillies" and tackling a stack of freshman English papers. Twenty years ago, he lived in a shack in rural West Tennessee and upholstered couches and chairs for a living. His front teeth were missing and his clothes were tattered. Townsfolk assumed he was retarded. Today, at 50, he has a Ph.D. and teaches English literature at the University of Tennessee-Martin.
NEWS
March 21, 1999 | MARTA W. ALDRICH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert Allen reads Homer's "Iliad" for fun before flipping on a rerun of "The Beverly Hillbillies" and tackling a stack of freshman English papers. Twenty years ago, he lived in a shack in rural West Tennessee and upholstered couches and chairs for a living. His front teeth were missing and his clothes were tattered. Townsfolk assumed he was retarded. Today, at 50, he has a Ph.D. and teaches English literature at the University of Tennessee-Martin.
SPORTS
June 27, 1992
While Robert Allen took in the Thursday night's fights, an acquaintance dropped by to ask where the Olympic box-offs were taking place--as if to wonder what Allen was doing at the Sports Arena. Allen begrudgingly answered the question, "They're in Phoenix." But he had to be asking himself the same thing. Although he was trying to remain upbeat about his first-round knockout loss at the Olympic trials to Raul Marquez on June 11, the pain and bitterness in Allen's voice were hard to disguise.
SPORTS
June 12, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Allen, the Camp Pendleton Marine who came out of nowhere to stop six consecutive opponents and win a national championship last February, ran out of miracles Thursday night. In an intense, classic matchup of two outstanding punchers in the light-middleweight class in the U.S. Olympic boxing trials, Raul Marquez of Houston wore down Allen, knocked him down in the third round and stopped him with 20 seconds left in the bout.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, Robert Koehler writes regularly about theater for Calendar.
Steve Allen is running his fingers over the keyboard of the small grand piano squeezed into one of his Van Nuys offices, and he is talking about one of his closest friends--his brain. "How do I play? Oh, I just make it up," he says. "My brain takes over. There's the common image of the musician sweating it out over the piano, breaking pencils and all the rest. But it's not the way my brain writes music. I say 'my brain,' rather than 'I,' because I'm conscious of a difference between the two."
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | Associated Press
American Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s board elected President Robert E. Allen as chairman and chief executive officer to succeed James E. Olson, who died from cancer two days ago, the company said today. AT&T also announced today its profit rose 10.6% in the first quarter to $492 million, equaling 46 cents per share, up from $445 million, or 40 cents a share, a year earlier.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1995 | From Reuters
Masco Corp. said Wednesday that it agreed to sell its Masco Home Furnishings Group for more than $1.1 billion to a new company formed by Morgan Stanley Capital Partners. Masco will receive more than $1 billion in cash, as well as options and warrants to invest in the acquiring company. Morgan Stanley Capital Partners is the private equity division of Morgan Stanley Group Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1997 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge on Friday gave a former high school football coach convicted of sexual misconduct involving two students the maximum sentence of five years and eight months in prison and described the crime as a moral "train wreck" through the community. Robert Allen Harrington, 57, did not show emotion as he was admonished by Judge Stuart T. Waldrip, who said the former Estancia High School volunteer had violated not only the students' trust but also their parents' and the school's.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
AT&T Corp. faced another crisis of leadership and direction Wednesday after President John Walter resigned because the company backed out of its promise to make him chairman and chief executive. Walter, 50, joined the nation's largest phone company eight months ago following a prolonged search for a successor to Chairman Robert Allen as chief executive. Walter, who had been CEO of R.R. Donnelley & Sons Co.
SPORTS
June 27, 1992
While Robert Allen took in the Thursday night's fights, an acquaintance dropped by to ask where the Olympic box-offs were taking place--as if to wonder what Allen was doing at the Sports Arena. Allen begrudgingly answered the question, "They're in Phoenix." But he had to be asking himself the same thing. Although he was trying to remain upbeat about his first-round knockout loss at the Olympic trials to Raul Marquez on June 11, the pain and bitterness in Allen's voice were hard to disguise.
SPORTS
June 12, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Allen, the Camp Pendleton Marine who came out of nowhere to stop six consecutive opponents and win a national championship last February, ran out of miracles Thursday night. In an intense, classic matchup of two outstanding punchers in the light-middleweight class in the U.S. Olympic boxing trials, Raul Marquez of Houston wore down Allen, knocked him down in the third round and stopped him with 20 seconds left in the bout.
SPORTS
June 10, 1992 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The calls from boxing promoters and managers average about six a week, and Jimmy Troy says they all want the same thing--a piece of Robert Allen, his 23-year-old Camp Pendleton Marine. Troy, Allen's adviser of six months, said the phone in his Stamford, Conn., office began ringing after Allen won the U.S. championships in February by knocking out all six of his opponents in the 156-pound division. "The vultures were really out there," said Troy, who played in the NHL for eight seasons.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, Robert Koehler writes regularly about theater for Calendar.
Steve Allen is running his fingers over the keyboard of the small grand piano squeezed into one of his Van Nuys offices, and he is talking about one of his closest friends--his brain. "How do I play? Oh, I just make it up," he says. "My brain takes over. There's the common image of the musician sweating it out over the piano, breaking pencils and all the rest. But it's not the way my brain writes music. I say 'my brain,' rather than 'I,' because I'm conscious of a difference between the two."
BUSINESS
February 16, 1992 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the eager anticipation and lively conversations emanating from the crowd in Anaheim's Marriott Hotel ballroom, it seemed like a rock star was en route. But when a side door opened, controversial TV real estate investment adviser Tom Vu bounded toward the podium. "Hi! You ready to make big money?" Vu, 34, asked as the crowd of about 1,000 people leapt to their feet in applause. "Motivating folks is in my blood. You wanna be rich don't you? Well if you make no money with me, you a loser!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1997 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge on Friday gave a former high school football coach convicted of sexual misconduct involving two students the maximum sentence of five years and eight months in prison and described the crime as a moral "train wreck" through the community. Robert Allen Harrington, 57, did not show emotion as he was admonished by Judge Stuart T. Waldrip, who said the former Estancia High School volunteer had violated not only the students' trust but also their parents' and the school's.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | Associated Press
American Telephone & Telegraph Co.'s board elected President Robert E. Allen as chairman and chief executive officer to succeed James E. Olson, who died from cancer two days ago, the company said today. AT&T also announced today its profit rose 10.6% in the first quarter to $492 million, equaling 46 cents per share, up from $445 million, or 40 cents a share, a year earlier.
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