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Robert Anderson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Robert Anderson, a colorful automotive engineer who turned Rockwell International Corp. into an aerospace powerhouse that in its heyday built the space shuttle and the B-1B bomber in sprawling Southern California factories, has died. He was 85. Anderson died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles from complications of cancer, said Pamela Tvrdy, a spokeswoman for Rockwell Collins, one of several companies that were spun off from Rockwell International.
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SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Derek Jeter, the New York Yankees' venerable captain, will not make his return this season before the All-Star break after another examination Thursday revealed a new fracture in his injured left ankle. Jeter, who injured the ankle in October against the Detroit Tigers during the American League Championship Series, was reexamined by Dr. Robert Anderson in Charlotte, N.C., who performed surgery last fall and discovered the new fracture. “They did a new CT scan which revealed a small crack in the area of the previous injury, so we have to back off and let that heal,” Yankees General Manager Brian Cashman said before New York played Arizona.
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NEWS
February 11, 2009
Robert Anderson obituary: The obituary of playwright Robert Anderson in Tuesday's California section gave the title of his play "Silent Night, Lonely Night" incorrectly as "Silent Night, Holy Night."
TRAVEL
October 3, 2010 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
"Oldest house," panted Robert Chavez, steering his pedicab past a 17th century adobe. "Oldest church," he added a moment later, nodding left toward the 17th century San Miguel Mission Church. Santa Fe - rich, tan, relentlessly artsy and frequently artificial - is really old, by American standards. The city turned 400 this year. When I visited recently, my mission wasn't really to chase after old buildings, odd galleries and new restaurants. I wanted a look at Santa Fe's newest downtown neighborhood, a once-blighted railroad zone whose revival is nearly complete.
NEWS
May 27, 1985
A suspected drug dealer has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after he allegedly fired a shot at an undercover Los Angeles narcotics officer who was investigating a South Los Angeles "rock house," police reported. The officer, Robert Anderson, was not wounded in the incident at a heavily fortified apartment in the 600 block of East 79th Street. The suspect was identified as Michael Varona, 21.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1986 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Audrey Wood, the venerated theatrical agent who represented and guided the careers of such playwrights as Carson McCullers, Tennessee Williams, William Inge, Robert Anderson and many more, has died in Connecticut four years after suffering a stroke. She was 80 and had been confined to a nursing home in Fairfield. In 1981, the year she was felled by the stroke, her autobiography, "Represented by Audrey Wood," was published.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police named a third suspect Tuesday in what appears to be a hate crime that critically injured a 20-year-old Native American who was stabbed 27 times near a Huntington Beach lifeguard tower. Shannon Martin, 23, of Huntington Beach, was charged with conspiracy and accessory to the crime after he allegedly retrieved the knife used in the stabbing from a bush near the lifeguard tower, prosecutors said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, Reviews of recent releases by Times critics
*** "The Nun's Story."Warner. $59.95. One of the most critically praised films of Fred Zinnemann's career, this Robert Anderson adaptation of Kathryn Hulme's book follows a young nun (Audrey Hepburn) through training and vows to crises in the Congo and WWII-torn Belgium. The film has a marvelous first half. All of Zinnemann's best qualities--tact, taste, integrity, quiet intellect and idealism--shine through in the convent scenes, as does the acting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1989
A father who accidentally killed his 6-year-old daughter with a homemade gun was sentenced Monday to 10 years in federal prison for possessing a pipe bomb in his house. Robert Anderson, 34, of Spring Valley wiped away tears as he began to address U.S. District Judge William Enright. "The loss of my daughter is going to be more than . . . " Anderson said without finishing. Anderson pleaded guilty several months ago to possessing a destructive device, which was found Oct. 10 in his home by sheriff's deputies investigating the shooting death of his daughter, Kristine Anderson.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1988 | SUVAN GEER
The visual stew Robert Anderson makes of rooms and things dissolving into a primordial puddle has always had a kind of repulsive fascination. His squiggly line ink drawings take an adolescent delight in things that ooze, rot or mutate. Yet underlying all the yeasty transformation is drawing with all the linear subtlety and complexity of an Albrecht Durer engraving. His newest drawings and lithographs strongly evoke Hieronymus Bosch's painting of hell within the dismembered bodies of the damned.
NEWS
February 11, 2009
Robert Anderson obituary: The obituary of playwright Robert Anderson in Tuesday's California section gave the title of his play "Silent Night, Lonely Night" incorrectly as "Silent Night, Holy Night."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Robert Anderson, a colorful automotive engineer who turned Rockwell International Corp. into an aerospace powerhouse that in its heyday built the space shuttle and the B-1B bomber in sprawling Southern California factories, has died. He was 85. Anderson died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles from complications of cancer, said Pamela Tvrdy, a spokeswoman for Rockwell Collins, one of several companies that were spun off from Rockwell International.
NEWS
January 23, 2000 | GREG SMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert Anderson says he never liked it when a shipment of raw nuclear materials arrived and he had to take inventory before the guys with the protective suits and Geiger counters were sent in. "I always questioned them about that. 'How come you guys don't go first?' " Anderson recalls from his days at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant. "We'd kind of laugh about it. We were always told that 'it'll be all right. There's no risk. It's all protected," he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1996 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police named a third suspect Tuesday in what appears to be a hate crime that critically injured a 20-year-old Native American who was stabbed 27 times near a Huntington Beach lifeguard tower. Shannon Martin, 23, of Huntington Beach, was charged with conspiracy and accessory to the crime after he allegedly retrieved the knife used in the stabbing from a bush near the lifeguard tower, prosecutors said.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Huntington Beach man was found guilty in federal court of conspiracy and mail fraud stemming from a scheme to bilk the state and insurance companies of $2.7 million in workers' compensation funds. A U.S. District Court jury in Los Angeles returned the verdict late Wednesday against Robert J. Anderson, 52. Four others, including a former Carson mayor and a former Downey police reserve officer, pleaded guilty previously and will be sentenced over the next three months.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
True to form, oil world legend Robert O. Anderson has once again been rescued by a wildcat well in an inhospitable part of the world. Hondo Oil & Gas Co., a twilight-years venture of the former Arco chairman, Wednesday announced a "potentially significant" natural gas discovery at a deep exploration well in Colombia's Magdalena Basin, 125 miles north of Bogota. The well, more than two miles deep, was Hondo's last hope as a company. Hondo, based in Roswell, N.M.
SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
Derek Jeter, the New York Yankees' venerable captain, will not make his return this season before the All-Star break after another examination Thursday revealed a new fracture in his injured left ankle. Jeter, who injured the ankle in October against the Detroit Tigers during the American League Championship Series, was reexamined by Dr. Robert Anderson in Charlotte, N.C., who performed surgery last fall and discovered the new fracture. “They did a new CT scan which revealed a small crack in the area of the previous injury, so we have to back off and let that heal,” Yankees General Manager Brian Cashman said before New York played Arizona.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN
Robert Anderson has made a good deal of money writing for films and TV over the last 30 years, but here is why he likes the theater: The time is the early 1950s. Anderson has just finished a new play called "Tea and Sympathy." His wife, Phyllis, reads it and says, "Do the housemaster's wife and the boy go on with their love affair?" Gosh, no, says Anderson. It only happens once. "They're never going to know that."
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1967, seven dry holes on Alaska's harsh North Slope had left Atlantic Richfield Chairman Robert O. Anderson facing a costly choice. Should he try one more? The consummate wildcatter, Anderson pushed ahead, making one of the strategic decisions in U.S. oil history. The day after Christmas, oil historian Daniel Yergin recounts, a sound like four jumbo jets flying just overhead announced a plume of spewing natural gas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER HEREDIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Port Hueneme Police Chief Robert Anderson didn't intend to go into law enforcement after getting out of the Army in the early 1960s. "I puttered around awhile and got married," Anderson said. Then he applied with the Los Angeles County Fire Department--and was turned down. "A county doctor told me they were hiring in the Sheriff's Department," Anderson said. "I said, 'OK, I'll take that.' All I wanted was to get a job at the time."
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