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NEWS
September 29, 1987 | Associated Press
Robert B. Greenblatt, a retired professor at the Medical College of Georgia and an internationally known endocrinologist who did pioneering work in oral contraception, died Sunday at his residence here. He was 80. Greenblatt, who came to the college 52 years ago as a research fellow, had received international recognition for pioneering work in the sequential oral contraceptive pill and the oral fertility pill.
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SPORTS
February 8, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
In the horse-racing world, it is still a lifetime until the May 3 Kentucky Derby. The top horses get hurt. They get ill. They suddenly, for no apparent reason, start turning in the training times of a plow horse. The favorites of mid-February become the forgottens of Triple Crown season. So when Gary Stevens rode Candy Boy to an impressive victory Saturday at Santa Anita, in the $200,000 Grade II Robert B. Lewis Stakes, both Stevens and trainer John Sadler did their best to couch their enthusiasm.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1994
Appointing Robert Fiske as special counsel for the Whitewater affair (Jan. 21) is an outrageous waste of the taxpayer's money and an egregious disservice to the American public. What will be accomplished by this investigation? How can this effort possibly help reduce our debt, pass a comprehensive health care program or in any way facilitate the solution of the very serious problems we have? We have a new, vigorous President who is working hard to bring about change in our country.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Former Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich, who served in the Clinton administration, warned during an interview of the perils of widening income inequality in the United States, excessive executive compensation and the future of labor. Reich is promoting his new documentary, "Inequality for All," which looks at the income gap and possible solutions. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January and won a special jury prize in the documentary competition for director Jacob Kornbluth.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home Box Office collected the most honors at Saturday's nighttime Emmy Awards presentation in Pasadena, including multiple statuettes for dramatic series "The Sopranos" and its movies "The Rat Pack" and "Winchell." Saturday's nontelevised event encompassed more than 50 categories, primarily in technical areas such as cinematography, editing and sound. An additional 27 awards, recognizing programs and performers, will be presented Sept. 12 and televised on Fox.
NEWS
June 8, 1991
Robert B. Masson, a broadcasting executive who in 1949 helped shape the format of the classic "Your Show of Shows" with Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca and four years later was named executive producer of Bob Hope's specials, died Tuesday. Herb Steinberg, a public relations executive for MCA, said his longtime friend was 75 and died at his Studio City home of lung cancer.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER
When he ran for President against Jimmy Carter in 1980, Ronald Reagan's rhetorical question to voters, "Are you better off than you were four years ago?" is often credited with helping him win the White House. The question is coming back this election year, and receiving a thorough examination by economist Robert B. Reich in a two-part, four-hour PBS special, "Made in America?"
BUSINESS
June 24, 1997 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Superior Court jury in Los Angeles has awarded $2.5 million to a former executive of bankrupt Newport Beach home builder Baldwin Co. after finding that the owners reneged on a promise to make him a partner in the company. The jury found that brothers James and Alfred Baldwin breached their contract with Robert B. Burns, who headed their company's Los Angeles-Ventura division. However, the jury awarded damages only against James Baldwin, who directly supervised Burns' division.
REAL ESTATE
March 5, 1989 | David M. Kinchen
Old Town Irvine is not in the heart of the Orange County city of 98,000, but the formerly ramshackle structures at Sand Canyon Avenue and the Santa Ana Freeway are attracting upscale shoppers who like the idea of a hotel made out an old lima bean silo and a fast-food place made from a blacksmith shop. The $20-million project is being developed on 6.5 acres contributed by the Irvine Co., a partner in the project with Robert B. Smith, James W. Ray, Michael D. Ray and Bernice Anglea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2010
A memorial service will be held July 27 for Robert B. Radnitz, a movie producer who received an Academy Award nomination for best picture for "Sounder." Radnitz, 85, died June 6 from complications of a stroke. The service, open to those who worked with and admired Radnitz, will begin at 11:30 a.m. at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Linwood Dunn Theater, 1313 N. Vine St., Hollywood. For more information, call (310) 374-3737.
SPORTS
February 2, 2013 | Wire reports
It's barely February, so Bob Baffert isn't rushing to anoint Flashback as his top Kentucky Derby contender. The gray colt made a solid case for himself, though, winning the $196,000 Robert B. Lewis Stakes by 61/4 lengths at Santa Anita in his 3-year-old debut Saturday. Baffert had a good day overall, with his 2-1 favorite Guilt Trip winning the $200,250 Strub Stakes by 11/2 lengths for owners Gary and Mary West, who also own Flashback. Baffert also won the first race on the card.
SPORTS
February 4, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
Saturday at Santa Anita brought the expected bright sunshine, impressive scenery and nice crowd. It also brought the completely unexpected. In the big race of the day, the Grade II Robert B. Lewis Stakes for 3-year-olds, the horse with the longest odds on the boards, I'll Have Another at 43-1, stole the day. If you happened to punch the No. 4 on the betting machine or give the clerk at the window that number by mistake, you would have collected...
SPORTS
February 3, 2012 | Eric Sondheimer
One of the best racing days of the Santa Anita meeting is set for Saturday, when three Grade II stakes will be on the 10-race card. They include the $200,000 Robert B. Lewis Stakes, a race for 3-year-olds at 1 1/16 miles and a tuneup for the Santa Anita Derby. Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert, looking to showcase a couple of his Kentucky Derby prospects, will send out Liaison, winner of the Grade I CashCall Futurity in December, and Sky Kingdom, a winner by 4 1/2 lengths in an allowance race at 1 1/16 miles Jan. 12. Liaison's primary competition could come from the improving Rousing Sermon, who has twice finished second to Liaison while rallying from way back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2010
A memorial service will be held July 27 for Robert B. Radnitz, a movie producer who received an Academy Award nomination for best picture for "Sounder." Radnitz, 85, died June 6 from complications of a stroke. The service, open to those who worked with and admired Radnitz, will begin at 11:30 a.m. at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Linwood Dunn Theater, 1313 N. Vine St., Hollywood. For more information, call (310) 374-3737.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Robert B. Radnitz, an English teacher turned movie producer who made some of Hollywood's more distinguished family fare, including "Sounder" and "Island of the Blue Dolphins," has died. He was 85. Radnitz died Sunday at his Malibu home from complications of a stroke he had years ago, said his wife, Pearl. With the release of his first film in 1959 – the boy-and-his-dog tale "A Dog of Flanders" – Radnitz started to develop a reputation as a maker of high-quality movies for children and their parents.
SPORTS
February 14, 2010 | Eric Sondheimer
Rallying from last place, the odds-on favorite Blind Luck was able to stick her nose in front at the finish to win Saturday's Grade I, $250,000 Las Virgenes Stakes over hard-luck loser Evening Jewel on a cloudless, picturesque day at Santa Anita. "One centimeter is good for me," trainer Jerry Hollendorfer said of his 3-year-old filly, who was runner-up for the 2009 Eclipse Award for juvenile fillies. It was an impressive victory in a field of five as Blind Luck fell behind by ninth lengths.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert B. Luce, 83, publisher of the New Republic magazine in the 1960s, died Nov. 29 at a nursing home in Boca Raton, Fla. Luce became publisher of the New Republic, an influential public affairs magazine, in 1963, after earlier publishing Changing Times magazine. He founded the Washington, D.C.-based publishing house Robert B. Luce Inc. in the 1960s. The firm's first book, "The Kennedy Circle," was published just before John F. Kennedy's 1961 inauguration as president.
NEWS
July 24, 1991
Robert B. Nemiroff, 61, Tony Award-winning Broadway producer of "Raisin." Nemiroff began as a book and music publisher, but became involved in the theater after his 1953 marriage to playwright Lorraine Hansberry. He adapted "Raisin" in 1974 from her 1959 play called "A Raisin in the Sun" about a Chicago black family. Nemiroff also co-produced Hansberry's "Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window" in 1964, and served as her literary executor after she died in 1965. On Thursday in New York of cancer.
SPORTS
February 6, 2010 | Eric Sondheimer
There are five stakes set to be run at Santa Anita on Saturday, including the first for 3-year-olds with Kentucky Derby ambitions. The Grade II, $150,000 Robert B. Lewis Stakes at 1 1/16 miles features two sons of 2000 horse of the year Tiznow. American Lion and Tiz Chrome make their first starts around two turns and lead a field of seven. The Grade I, $250,000 Las Virgenes Stakes at one mile is headed by the 3-year-old filly Blind Luck, who earned $709,050 in 2009 with a pair of Grade I triumphs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Robert B. Parker, the best-selling author whose long-running "Spenser" private-eye novels updated the genre of hard-boiled detective fiction in the 1970s, has died. He was 77. Parker died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Cambridge, Mass., said his longtime literary agent, Helen Brann. "He was at his desk, working on a new book -- a new Spenser," Brann said. Once dubbed "the doyen of old-school, hard-boiled American pulp," the former English professor at Northeastern University in Boston wrote 60 novels -- 37 of them featuring his tough but literate private eye, Spenser, who debuted in "The Godwulf Manuscript" in 1973.
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