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Robert B Costello

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NEWS
October 3, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan said Thursday that he will nominate Robert B. Costello to be assistant secretary of defense for acquisitions and logistics. Costello is executive director for purchasing for General Motors Corp.
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NEWS
June 29, 1988 | Associated Press
The Pentagon's top procurement official drew criticism today when he said the criminal investigation into fraud and bribery in weapons buying shows the strength--not the weakness--of Reagan Administration defense policies. "So, if we have accomplished so much, why have there been so many cases of procurement fraud?" Robert B. Costello asked at a packed hearing of the House Armed Services Committee. "Is there more corruption now?" "We don't think so.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan, moving quickly to fill a key vacancy in the Pentagon's hierarchy, said Wednesday that he will nominate Robert B. Costello as undersecretary of defense for acquisition. Costello's confirmation hearings before the Senate could prove contentious since he would replace Richard P. Godwin. Godwin resigned earlier this month, voicing exasperation over the Pentagon's bureaucracy and his inability to forge reforms in its purchasing practices.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1989 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Northrop, responding to criticism of its B-2 stealth bomber program, defended the program Friday by saying that production costs for the aircraft have "remained stable" and its quality is "high." Northrop was answering critical comments by the Pentagon's former chief of procurement, Robert B. Costello, who in an interview Thursday expressed "serious and grave concerns" about soaring costs and quality-control problems with the B-2. Costello, who resigned his Pentagon post last week, said his concerns about the B-2 program were so serious that he had tried unsuccessfully to have the program killed.
NEWS
June 8, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration will subsidize the building of a new rocket fuel plant to replace the Pacific Engineering & Production Co. facility near Henderson, Nev., that blew up last month, Air Force officials said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Robert B. Costello, who last week stepped down as the Pentagon's chief of procurement, said Thursday that he attempted unsuccessfully to kill the B-2 stealth bomber program over the past year because of spiraling cost, poor quality and bad management at Northrop, the prime contractor. "I have serious and grave concerns," he said in an interview. "The quality issues on the B-2 are a significant concern to me." Costello's comments are likely to exacerbate Northrop's problems in keeping the B-2 program on track.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER and ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writers
The Pentagon is establishing a new Defense Inspection Agency as the primary office to assure compliance with the recently signed intermediate nuclear forces treaty with the Soviet Union, Secretary of Defense Frank C. Carlucci said Monday. The agency will spend between $180 million and $200 million this fiscal year to begin the task of carrying out the extensive verification provisions, Carlucci told the Senate Armed Services Committee during a ratification hearing on the treaty.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1991 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Saddam Hussein faces a $1-trillion-plus array of lethal weaponry that's innovative, sophisticated and disturbingly unproven. Should there be war, Iraq will be as much a high-tech test bed as a killing ground. If the systems perform as promised, they will crack Iraq's military as swiftly and surely as they will save tens of thousands of American lives. If they do not, the Pentagon will have the bitter task of justifying its enormous faith and investment in high technology.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
"Star Wars" is coming down to Earth. President Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative, squeezed by budget realities, internal Pentagon skepticism and political opposition, is being restructured substantially, according to military and congressional officials. Instead of a vast array of space-based launching sensors, satellites and anti-missile rockets, the program is being redrawn as a much more limited defensive system based largely on land. Lt. Gen. James A.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
House Armed Services Chairman Les Aspin (D-Wis.) Wednesday called on Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci to impose a moratorium of up to two months on all new contracts awarded to defense firms under suspicion in the current Pentagon procurement fraud scandal.
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