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Robert B Jr Fiske

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NEWS
February 24, 1994 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. on Wednesday appointed eight lawyers to assist in his investigation of the Whitewater affair--most of them, like himself, attorneys from New York, but two of them Southerners whose style will be more familiar in President Clinton's home state of Arkansas.
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NEWS
August 11, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Turning aside Democratic demands that he step down as the newly appointed Whitewater independent counsel, Kenneth W. Starr said Wednesday that he plans to render an "independent judgment" on all matters covered by the wide-ranging investigation. Starr said he will "build upon" the investigation done by his predecessor, Robert B. Fiske Jr., but pointedly refused to say that he would accept Fiske's conclusions on parts of the inquiry already completed.
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NEWS
June 24, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior officials at the Treasury Department and the White House have been told by their personal attorneys that they do not expect special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. to seek criminal indictments against them because of allegedly improper meetings linked to the Whitewater controversy.
NEWS
August 6, 1994 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversial Whitewater criminal investigation took a surprising turn Friday when a three-judge panel replaced special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. with Kenneth W. Starr, solicitor general under former President George Bush. The move stunned President Clinton's advisers, who had asked the court to reappoint Fiske under the terms of a newly enacted independent counsel law that had lapsed when the investigation began more than six months ago. At the White House, Counsel Lloyd N.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | From Associated Press
Whitewater special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. will issue his first report today, giving his findings on Vincent Foster's death and contacts between regulators and the White House. Sources said the report will reaffirm the police conclusion that Foster, the deputy White House counsel who was found fatally shot in a suburban Washington park last July, committed suicide. The interim report comes as Fiske is wrapping up the Washington phase of his investigation.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
Declaring that it might hurt his criminal investigation, Whitewater Special Counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. said Friday he is declining an invitation to appear at congressional hearings later this month on the Whitewater affair. Fiske notified House Banking Committee Chairman Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.), in a letter that "the major part of my work is still in progress" and that he should be allowed to complete his entire investigation before coming under congressional scrutiny.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With pressure mounting for congressional hearings into the Whitewater controversy, special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. on Monday implored the legislative leadership to avoid such sessions because they would "pose a severe risk to the integrity" of his inquiry. Fiske argued that Congress would want to interview the same witnesses, running the risk of "premature disclosures" and "tailored testimony."
NEWS
January 21, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fulfilling a White House promise made in response to GOP demands, Atty. Gen. Janet Reno on Thursday appointed former U.S. Atty. Robert B. Fiske Jr., a Republican, as special counsel to look into the tangled Whitewater affair. Fiske immediately pledged "a complete, thorough and impartial" inquiry into the matter, which involves investments by President Clinton and his wife, Hillary, in an Ozark Mountain resort and loans to the Clintons by a failed savings and loan.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
The federal government signed a three-year lease Thursday for office space for special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr., who will investigate President and Mrs. Clinton's dealings with a real estate developer and savings and loan owner. The 6,491 square feet of office space leased for Fiske and his staff in an office building in west Little Rock is on the same floor as the local FBI office.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | Associated Press
Special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. made a low-key start Monday on a job that will include interrogating President and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton under oath on their business dealings in Arkansas. Among other things, he found out how to rent an office in Little Rock, Ark., while getting the government to pay for it. He also received a formal job application. Fiske will travel to Little Rock today and be shown some possible offices by a local General Services Administration official.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
House Banking Committee Chairman Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.) assailed Special Counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. on Friday for refusing to testify at Whitewater hearings scheduled for later this month and accused him of secretly providing information to Republican committee members for partisan attacks on President Clinton.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | From Associated Press
Declaring that it might hurt his criminal investigation, Whitewater Special Counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. said Friday he is declining an invitation to appear at congressional hearings later this month on the Whitewater affair. Fiske notified House Banking Committee Chairman Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.), in a letter that "the major part of my work is still in progress" and that he should be allowed to complete his entire investigation before coming under congressional scrutiny.
NEWS
July 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno asked a federal appeals court Friday to appoint Robert B. Fiske Jr. as an independent counsel to continue his investigation of President Clinton's investments with the owner of a failed Arkansas thrift. Reno took the action a day after Clinton signed legislation reviving the independent counsel statute, which had lapsed for 18 months.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. concluded in a report released Thursday that presidential counsel Vincent Foster committed suicide last summer after suffering previously undisclosed "panic attacks" as well as weight loss, sleeplessness and a decline in job productivity.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was relief but no jubilation in the White House at news Thursday that Whitewater special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. would not seek indictments in the Washington phase of his investigation. And even the relief is likely to be short-lived. The President, his wife and his senior staff still face a protracted investigation into a variety of matters in Arkansas and Washington, as well as congressional hearings that start July 26. Also, White House Counsel Lloyd N.
NEWS
June 30, 1994 | From Associated Press
Whitewater special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. will issue his first report today, giving his findings on Vincent Foster's death and contacts between regulators and the White House. Sources said the report will reaffirm the police conclusion that Foster, the deputy White House counsel who was found fatally shot in a suburban Washington park last July, committed suicide. The interim report comes as Fiske is wrapping up the Washington phase of his investigation.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House agreed Thursday to turn over to Whitewater special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. all of its documents connected to Vincent Foster, the deputy White House counsel whose death last July has been ruled a suicide. Deputy White House Counsel Joel Klein said that he believes Fiske now is investigating the actions of White House officials, including then-White House Counsel Bernard Nussbaum, in the aftermath of Foster's death.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | SARA FRITZ and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton were questioned under oath at the White House Sunday by special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. about matters related to the Whitewater investigation, including the apparent suicide of presidential aide Vincent W. Foster.
NEWS
June 28, 1994 | Associated Press
The House Banking Committee will begin Whitewater hearings July 26 and has asked special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr. and top White House officials to testify. Committee Chairman Henry B. Gonzalez (D-Tex.) said Monday he invited Fiske to report on the "Washington phase" of his inquiry. Gonzalez said the first hearing would focus on the removal of Whitewater files from White House Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster's office by White House officials after his death last July.
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