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Robert B Parker

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman
Robert B. Parker, who died Monday in his Cambridge, Mass., home at age 77, spent his final moments doing exactly what he'd done for almost four decades: sitting at his desk, working on his next novel. He didn't concern himself with looking back. Instead, he wrote, and in the process irrevocably altered American detective fiction, forging a link between classic depictions and more contemporary approaches to the form. Parker produced more than five dozen books in a variety of styles, including westerns, historical fiction, a marriage memoir and a nonfiction account of horse racing.
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NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
The breakup of the Wine Advocate 's Robert B. Parker with his former lead wine critic Antonio Galloni is getting ugly. You might remember that Parker sold a substantial interest in his influential wine newsletter, the most powerful in the country, to Singapore investors last December. Though Parker isn't exactly retiring, he is stepping down as editor-in-chief. And that position has been claimed not by Galloni, his heir apparent, but by Lisa Perrotti-Brown , a Master of Wine who was a Singapore-based correspondent for the publication.  Fast forward to Feb. 12: Galloni leaves to found his own website . End of story, or so it seemed.
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NEWS
October 6, 1999 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There comes a time in nearly every prolific mystery writer's life when one series isn't enough. Workaholic wordsmiths from Agatha Christie to Donald E. Westlake have felt compelled to expand their contributions to the ever-growing population of continuing crime solvers. Recently, Robert B. Parker has been bitten by the bug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Robert B. Parker, the best-selling author whose long-running "Spenser" private-eye novels updated the genre of hard-boiled detective fiction in the 1970s, has died. He was 77. Parker died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Cambridge, Mass., said his longtime literary agent, Helen Brann. "He was at his desk, working on a new book -- a new Spenser," Brann said. Once dubbed "the doyen of old-school, hard-boiled American pulp," the former English professor at Northeastern University in Boston wrote 60 novels -- 37 of them featuring his tough but literate private eye, Spenser, who debuted in "The Godwulf Manuscript" in 1973.
BOOKS
July 6, 1986 | James Brown, Brown, author of "Hot Wire" (Arbor House), is at work on another novel, to be published by William Morrow & Co. and
Private detective Spenser fast- talks his way in and out of trouble in Robert B. Parker's "Taming a Sea-Horse." From New York's 42nd Street to the Crown Prince Clubs--a chain of prostitution resorts for the wealthy--tough guy Spenser searches for April Kyle, a hooker who has mysteriously disappeared. This is Parker's 13th Spenser novel, and in many respects, it is a better book than his previous best seller, "A Catskill Eagle."
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
The breakup of the Wine Advocate 's Robert B. Parker with his former lead wine critic Antonio Galloni is getting ugly. You might remember that Parker sold a substantial interest in his influential wine newsletter, the most powerful in the country, to Singapore investors last December. Though Parker isn't exactly retiring, he is stepping down as editor-in-chief. And that position has been claimed not by Galloni, his heir apparent, but by Lisa Perrotti-Brown , a Master of Wine who was a Singapore-based correspondent for the publication.  Fast forward to Feb. 12: Galloni leaves to found his own website . End of story, or so it seemed.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1985 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
This is TV history: the first time that two series premiering on consecutive nights on the same network each have a major character who wears a black stocking cap. Are ABC's "Spenser: For Hire" (10 tonight) and "Hollywood Beat" (8 Saturday night) the beginning of a major fashion trend? Will ABC's shrewd stocking-cap strategy work against the Friday night clothes horses on NBC's smash "Miami Vice?"
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's the set-up: Philip Marlowe, L.A.'s most famous fictional gumshoe, has finally tied the knot--with the beautiful heiress Linda Loring, last seen at the end of Raymond Chandler's "Playback" in 1958 phoning Marlowe from Paris and saying she wants to marry him. The new Mrs. Marlowe is head-over-high-heels in love with the hard-boiled detective. The feeling is mutual. Marlowe closes up his seedy office above Hollywood Boulevard, leaving L.A.'
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | DICK LOCHTE, Special To The Times
In Norman Bogner's "To Die in Provence," (Forge, 384 pages, $24.95), the cheerful and sunny resort in the south of France takes on a decidedly shady cast.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flashback to the fall of 1989: Seated in a padded booth in a restaurant in Orange before a book-signing for "Poodle Springs," Robert B. Parker waited for his bowl of bean soup to cool, and speculated whether he would write another novel based on Raymond Chandler's legendary private eye, Philip Marlowe. Reviews for "Poodle Springs," Parker's completion of an unfinished Chandler manuscript, had already begun filtering in and, in general, they were as hot as his bean soup.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman
Robert B. Parker, who died Monday in his Cambridge, Mass., home at age 77, spent his final moments doing exactly what he'd done for almost four decades: sitting at his desk, working on his next novel. He didn't concern himself with looking back. Instead, he wrote, and in the process irrevocably altered American detective fiction, forging a link between classic depictions and more contemporary approaches to the form. Parker produced more than five dozen books in a variety of styles, including westerns, historical fiction, a marriage memoir and a nonfiction account of horse racing.
BOOKS
July 10, 2005 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
In Stephen Frey's "The Chairman," 36-year-old Christian Gillette, a managing partner of a powerful Manhattan private equity firm, is elected chairman of Everest Capital after the firm's founder is found dead, probably murdered. Within a few pages, it looks as if Gillette is slated for a similar fate. Through 300 pages of narrow squeaks, hidden enemies lurk, waiting to strike and then to strike again.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2005 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
Robert B. Parker's "Appaloosa" doesn't tell us much about the real Old West, but it offers a dryly amusing take on the Hollywood version. Elmore Leonard wrote westerns before finding his groove with contemporary crime stories; and Parker, best known for the Spenser mystery series and for completing "Poodle Springs," begun by Raymond Chandler before his death, returns to the genre for the fun of it. Here he revels in "Yep. Nope."
BOOKS
June 20, 2004 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Yes, Robert B. Parker is back, and with him, Boston private eye Spenser; his ladylove, Susan Silverman; Pearl, the wonder dog revivified; and, in due course, his sidekick Hawk, although a bit subdued. With the gang all here, Parker hits the top of his form -- not that there's much time to notice while choking back giggles and guffaws.
BOOKS
December 21, 2003 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Frederick FORSYTH'S latest adventure roams from the killing fields of Vietnam to Bosnia, from Langley to Arabian emirates and the corrupt Caribbean south. His message is outlandish: that acts have consequences, intended and unintended. Attorney Cal Dexter was once a much decorated Navy SEAL and has kept in good training. When a predator lures away his beloved daughter, plunges her into prostitution, then batters her to death, he pursues and liquidates the vermin.
BOOKS
April 20, 2003 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Breaking news: Robert B. Parker is back in full form. Spenser, Susan and Hawk have recovered wits and wit. Wisecracks snap, pop, crackle all the way. Flippancy flips as bullets fly. Even Pearl, the Wonder Dog, reappears as Pearl II and turns out as meddling, affectionate and endearing as her predecessor.
NEWS
September 5, 1985 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
T. Jefferson Parker passes by the scene of the crime every day while driving through picturesque Laguna Canyon between his home in Laguna Beach and his job in Irvine. Homicide Detective Tom Shephard drove down Laguna Canyon Road that early August morning after Tim Algernon's body was discovered--his face and body burned beyond recognition, a blackened rock protruding from his forehead and more than $1,000 in bills stuffed down his throat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Robert B. Parker, the best-selling author whose long-running "Spenser" private-eye novels updated the genre of hard-boiled detective fiction in the 1970s, has died. He was 77. Parker died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Cambridge, Mass., said his longtime literary agent, Helen Brann. "He was at his desk, working on a new book -- a new Spenser," Brann said. Once dubbed "the doyen of old-school, hard-boiled American pulp," the former English professor at Northeastern University in Boston wrote 60 novels -- 37 of them featuring his tough but literate private eye, Spenser, who debuted in "The Godwulf Manuscript" in 1973.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | DICK LOCHTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There comes a time in nearly every prolific mystery writer's life when one series isn't enough. Workaholic wordsmiths from Agatha Christie to Donald E. Westlake have felt compelled to expand their contributions to the ever-growing population of continuing crime solvers. Recently, Robert B. Parker has been bitten by the bug.
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