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Robert B Reich

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1987
I must take exception to Robert B. Reich's characterization of Judge Thatcher from "Huckleberry Finn" as one of the "great bullies of American fiction." I refer to Reich's article (Editorial Pages, April 8), "It's Too Easy to Indict Rot at the Top." April 8, 1987). I have read the novel in question at least 12 times over the years, and I've always believed Judge Thatcher to have been squarely on Huck Finn's side.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Former Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich, who served in the Clinton administration, warned during an interview of the perils of widening income inequality in the United States, excessive executive compensation and the future of labor. Reich is promoting his new documentary, "Inequality for All," which looks at the income gap and possible solutions. The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January and won a special jury prize in the documentary competition for director Jacob Kornbluth.
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BUSINESS
October 6, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich criticized Republicans in Congress for seeking to give tax breaks to companies without taking into consideration whether managers are keeping their employees. Corporations' efforts to shrink their work forces by firing employees hurt "many companies in the long term and on the economy as a whole," Reich said at a forum on layoffs sponsored by Harper's magazine.
OPINION
January 31, 2009
Re "Power in the union," Opinion, Jan. 26 Robert B. Reich writes of unions as potential saviors for our current economic downturn. At 64, I am old enough to remember growing up in Fairless Hills, Penn., a town constructed by U.S. Steel in the early 1950s to house workers for a new steel plant near Philadelphia. The Steelworkers Union then obtained great benefits for its members. A menial job at "the mill" for a high school graduate paid double what my father, a high school teacher, earned.
OPINION
January 31, 2009
Re "Power in the union," Opinion, Jan. 26 Robert B. Reich writes of unions as potential saviors for our current economic downturn. At 64, I am old enough to remember growing up in Fairless Hills, Penn., a town constructed by U.S. Steel in the early 1950s to house workers for a new steel plant near Philadelphia. The Steelworkers Union then obtained great benefits for its members. A menial job at "the mill" for a high school graduate paid double what my father, a high school teacher, earned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994 | KAY HWANGBO
The United States is at risk of developing into a two-tiered society in which only a small, well-educated minority holds good jobs, warned U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert B. Reich during a meeting Tuesday in Sun Valley. "We cannot live in a society . . . in which one big portion of the population is going on a downward escalator while the other small portion that has received an education is going on an up escalator," Reich said. "That great divide is going to fragment our nation."
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich said Tuesday that the Clinton Administration's prospects in the 1996 election are clouded by the efforts of "demagogues" trying to convince average Americans that immigration, welfare, big government, affirmative action and free trade are to blame for their stagnating incomes. Reich said the impact of those polarizing issues, fanned by politicians, is "the one question mark hanging over 1996. . . . I worry about that." He didn't mention any politicians by name.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Declaring that job security is largely a thing of the past, U.S. Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich on Wednesday championed a Clinton Administration proposal to weave a new safety net for American workers dislocated by the increasingly unpredictable job market. Reich, testifying at a congressional hearing held at East Los Angeles College, pushed for adoption of a bill, known as the Re-Employment Act, that would revamp the unemployment insurance system and consolidate major job-training programs.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton bade a formal adieu to Warren Christopher on Thursday and praised the "steely determination" of his secretary of State as he hinted broadly that he might add Republicans to his Cabinet to help carry out a centrist second-term agenda. Meanwhile, Transportation Secretary Federico Pena and Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich tendered their resignations, and Ambassador to Japan Walter F. Mondale joined the exodus. At the same time, Atty. Gen.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Bill Clinton's immediate economic priorities were ever in doubt, they are no longer: for the short term, he made clear Thursday, stimulating growth and creating jobs will take precedence over deficit reduction. He also provided the clearest answer yet to the second big question about his economic strategy: how he would pursue his stimulus priorities without throwing nervous financial markets into a panic.
NEWS
November 15, 1999 | Associated Press
Robert Reich, who served as labor secretary under President Clinton and Al Gore, is endorsing the vice president's rival for the Democratic nomination, two senior party officials said Sunday night. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Reich was telling fellow Democrats that he would endorse former New Jersey Sen. Bill Bradley today in New Hampshire. Reich headed the Department of Labor during Clinton's first term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998 | ROBERT B. REICH
Economic policymakers have been fighting the last war so long, they can't see they're entering a different battle on the opposite front. The old war was against inflation. It shaped the fears of those who watched it get out of control in the 1970s. These are the same people who now run the central banks, ministries and international lending institutions. Yet the inflation war is over. The new enemy approaches from the opposite direction: spiraling deflation.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three days after President Clinton proclaimed the nation "on the cusp" of reversing its worst social problems, his outgoing Labor secretary issued an unusually public word of caution, warning that the continuing gap between rich and poor "threatens to blight an otherwise promising future." With pointed references to the president's campaign rhetoric, Robert B.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton bade a formal adieu to Warren Christopher on Thursday and praised the "steely determination" of his secretary of State as he hinted broadly that he might add Republicans to his Cabinet to help carry out a centrist second-term agenda. Meanwhile, Transportation Secretary Federico Pena and Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich tendered their resignations, and Ambassador to Japan Walter F. Mondale joined the exodus. At the same time, Atty. Gen.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton administration has finally settled on an election-year strategy for exploiting popular concern about corporate irresponsibility without resorting to any new government programs to change business behavior. Instead, administration officials said Tuesday that President Clinton and his aides will use the "bully pulpit" to praise examples of good corporate behavior.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich criticized Republicans in Congress for seeking to give tax breaks to companies without taking into consideration whether managers are keeping their employees. Corporations' efforts to shrink their work forces by firing employees hurt "many companies in the long term and on the economy as a whole," Reich said at a forum on layoffs sponsored by Harper's magazine.
NEWS
September 1, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rapid job growth since President Clinton took office has failed to offset growing wage and income inequality in the United States, as workers lacking advanced education and uneasy with new technology find themselves locked out of the middle class, Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich warned Wednesday.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three days after President Clinton proclaimed the nation "on the cusp" of reversing its worst social problems, his outgoing Labor secretary issued an unusually public word of caution, warning that the continuing gap between rich and poor "threatens to blight an otherwise promising future." With pointed references to the president's campaign rhetoric, Robert B.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1995 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Expanding current efforts to crack down on sweatshops in Southern California's garment industry, Labor Department officials and local manufacturers have agreed to set up a consortium to police working conditions. Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich is due to announce the details of the consortium, to be known as the Compliance Alliance, during a visit to the Los Angeles area Wednesday.
NEWS
May 17, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich said Tuesday that the Clinton Administration's prospects in the 1996 election are clouded by the efforts of "demagogues" trying to convince average Americans that immigration, welfare, big government, affirmative action and free trade are to blame for their stagnating incomes. Reich said the impact of those polarizing issues, fanned by politicians, is "the one question mark hanging over 1996. . . . I worry about that." He didn't mention any politicians by name.
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