Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Ballard
IN THE NEWS

Robert Ballard

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1994 | DOUG FERGUSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
First, Robert Ballard would visit the police station to get a light for his cigarette. Then he would tiptoe along a wood-framed flower bed in front of the Main Street Cafe, over to the Dairy Deal for a Pepsi and an ice cream cone, and on to Joe Haley's Texaco station. He was always talking, always smiling. And if he didn't have time to stop, he would wave. "He'd come up and say things out of the blue like, 'I can't swim,' " Haley said. "And we'd say, 'Well, you can't swim, then.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 14, 2012 | Patt Morrison
The Challenger Deep, a fissure in the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean, lies farther below the Earth's surface than Mt. Everest reaches above it. And James Cameron, the science-enthralled director and underwater explorer, made it his Lindbergh moment, soloing humankind's deepest-ever plunge last month in a purpose-made submarine fitted out - natch - with 3D cameras. One hundred years ago today, the world's most famous accidental deep dive took the ocean liner Titanic to the bottom of the Atlantic.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 14, 1986
The leader of an expedition to the wreck of the Titanic rode a midget sub to a depth of more than two miles southeast of Newfoundland to see the hull of the luxury liner firsthand. Robert Ballard, leader of the Navy-financed exploration, and two crew members made a six-hour dive in preparation for an 11-day examination of the ship, which hit an iceberg and sank on April 14, 1912.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Deep Ocean Expeditions offers the ultimate Titanic tour this summer: See the shipwreck firsthand from a tiny submersible during the 100th anniversary of its sinking. Despite the stiff $60,000 price tag, the Titanic dives became so popular among tourists that the company added a third trip. Now expedition coordinator Rob McCallum tells National Geographic News that Titanic dives planned for July and August will be the company's last. Deep Ocean holds the exclusive charter for Titanic dives.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | Associated Press
The remote-controlled robot that has shot up-close videotape of the Titanic's battered hull and details of its luxurious interior failed to work for the second day in a row Wednesday, scuttling plans for two Navy officers to practice operating the small tethered device.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Deep Ocean Expeditions offers the ultimate Titanic tour this summer: See the shipwreck firsthand from a tiny submersible during the 100th anniversary of its sinking. Despite the stiff $60,000 price tag, the Titanic dives became so popular among tourists that the company added a third trip. Now expedition coordinator Rob McCallum tells National Geographic News that Titanic dives planned for July and August will be the company's last. Deep Ocean holds the exclusive charter for Titanic dives.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Researchers who worked around the clock for nearly a week examining the wreck of the Titanic took a break Saturday to study photos of the ship in its 2 1/2-mile-deep watery grave and catch up on repairs. The explorers planned to perform maintenance on the submarine Alvin, make equipment checks "and give everybody a break," said Sharon Lauzon, a spokeswoman at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, co-sponsor of the expedition. "They've been working 24-hour days since (last) Sunday."
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | Associated Press
Explorers found the stern of the Titanic about 200 feet from the main portion of the sunken luxury liner, the expedition's leader reported Sunday. "At least one third of the ship, the stern section, is intact," Robert Ballard said by radio from his research vessel, Atlantis 2, to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution after the seventh dive in eight days to the sunken ship. "We were very surprised to find so large a section intact and sitting up in the water," he said.
NEWS
July 18, 1986 | Associated Press
Strong ocean currents 2 1/2 miles below the surface forced researchers to suspend plans Thursday to survey an iceberg's fatal gash that sent the Titanic to the sea's bottom 74 years ago, researchers said. "Today was a hard dive," chief explorer Robert Ballard said in a ship-to-shore report after his fifth day of diving to the site in a tiny submarine. "The current was very strong, and there was a lot of ticklish matter in the water, so it was a hard-working dive. The current seemed to be tidal."
NEWS
September 3, 1985 | Associated Press
An exhausted group of scientists suspended their survey of the remains of the Titanic today after finding the hull in such good condition that their leader called it "a museum piece." The wreck of the massive ocean liner, which has been the object of numerous searches, was found in 13,120 feet of water by a French-American expedition about 370 miles off the Canadian province of Newfoundland, the French Institute for Research and Exploitation of the Sea said Monday in Paris. (Story, Page 5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Bradshaw White, who documented the 1985 discovery of the sunken Titanic, then returned to the bottom of the ocean more than 30 times to film and recover artifacts from the ill-fated vessel, died Feb. 4 at Glendale Adventist Medical Center. He was 66. White died from complications of an aortic aneurysm, said his daughter, Krista Few of Yokosuka, Japan. The public received an up-close look at the wreckage site through images White captured.
OPINION
June 13, 2004
The Titanic is still sunk. But the idea of the Titanic has, like Molly Brown, proved unsinkable. Thus, fans of this endlessly eulogized ship seek more profound expeditions to explore what they see as another mystery of the deep. Word has reached the surface that the Titanic is decaying. This appears to surprise Titanic buffs, that a mammoth metal ocean liner nearly three football fields long and weighing 52,310 tons would not perfectly withstand the pressures of time and the ocean.
NEWS
January 25, 1999 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
So you're Robert D. Ballard, a famed ocean explorer, and when you're only 43, you find the wreck of the Titanic, a prize that has eluded you and other undersea hunters for decades. What do you do for an encore? "I don't think you do," says Ballard, now 56. "You just move on." And "I don't think that's a bad thing," he adds. "I would hope my best discoveries are still ahead of me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1994 | DOUG FERGUSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
First, Robert Ballard would visit the police station to get a light for his cigarette. Then he would tiptoe along a wood-framed flower bed in front of the Main Street Cafe, over to the Dairy Deal for a Pepsi and an ice cream cone, and on to Joe Haley's Texaco station. He was always talking, always smiling. And if he didn't have time to stop, he would wave. "He'd come up and say things out of the blue like, 'I can't swim,' " Haley said. "And we'd say, 'Well, you can't swim, then.
BOOKS
December 6, 1992 | Allene Symons
This is the book Titanic buffs have been waiting for. "Titanic: An Illustrated History" is likely to command the best berth in the library, even if one already has a shelf full of ill-fated-liner lore. The lavishly wide format is ideal for Marschall's dramatic paintings, which sweep across page-spreads so vividly you can almost hear the four-funneled ghost gliding through the waves.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | Associated Press
The remote-controlled robot that has shot up-close videotape of the Titanic's battered hull and details of its luxurious interior failed to work for the second day in a row Wednesday, scuttling plans for two Navy officers to practice operating the small tethered device.
OPINION
June 13, 2004
The Titanic is still sunk. But the idea of the Titanic has, like Molly Brown, proved unsinkable. Thus, fans of this endlessly eulogized ship seek more profound expeditions to explore what they see as another mystery of the deep. Word has reached the surface that the Titanic is decaying. This appears to surprise Titanic buffs, that a mammoth metal ocean liner nearly three football fields long and weighing 52,310 tons would not perfectly withstand the pressures of time and the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Ralph Bradshaw White, who documented the 1985 discovery of the sunken Titanic, then returned to the bottom of the ocean more than 30 times to film and recover artifacts from the ill-fated vessel, died Feb. 4 at Glendale Adventist Medical Center. He was 66. White died from complications of an aortic aneurysm, said his daughter, Krista Few of Yokosuka, Japan. The public received an up-close look at the wreckage site through images White captured.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | Associated Press
Explorers found the stern of the Titanic about 200 feet from the main portion of the sunken luxury liner, the expedition's leader reported Sunday. "At least one third of the ship, the stern section, is intact," Robert Ballard said by radio from his research vessel, Atlantis 2, to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution after the seventh dive in eight days to the sunken ship. "We were very surprised to find so large a section intact and sitting up in the water," he said.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Researchers who worked around the clock for nearly a week examining the wreck of the Titanic took a break Saturday to study photos of the ship in its 2 1/2-mile-deep watery grave and catch up on repairs. The explorers planned to perform maintenance on the submarine Alvin, make equipment checks "and give everybody a break," said Sharon Lauzon, a spokeswoman at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, co-sponsor of the expedition. "They've been working 24-hour days since (last) Sunday."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|