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Robert Barbee

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NEWS
September 16, 1988 | BOB SECTER and TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writers
When Jim Christiansen eyes the landscape here, he sees needlessly charred meadows, senselessly scorched and blackened husks of lodgepole pines and--uglier still--all those dollar signs that may not ring up on his hotel's cash register. Joe Halladay has another vision, one of an unavoidable, wrenching devastation but also of an awe-inspiring rebirth and renewal that is part of fascinating and ever-changing nature.
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NEWS
September 16, 1988 | BOB SECTER and TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writers
When Jim Christiansen eyes the landscape here, he sees needlessly charred meadows, senselessly scorched and blackened husks of lodgepole pines and--uglier still--all those dollar signs that may not ring up on his hotel's cash register. Joe Halladay has another vision, one of an unavoidable, wrenching devastation but also of an awe-inspiring rebirth and renewal that is part of fascinating and ever-changing nature.
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OPINION
June 4, 1989
Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney's university-age daughter, Mary, was refused a summer job at Yellowstone National Park (Part I, May 24). She was not "qualified" for the job, according to the notice from the park to her mother, Lynne. After receiving this notice, Lynne Cheney called park Supt. Robert Barbee. After the call, park officials took another look at Mary's application. Guess What! Mary was then hired for the same job for which her application had been refused because of her lack of qualification.
NEWS
May 24, 1989
One of the lucky college students who landed much-sought-after summer work at Yellowstone National Park is Mary Cheney, daughter of Lynne V. Cheney, chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and Defense Secretary Dick Cheney. Mary Cheney was rejected when she applied last spring, the Washington Post reported. According to her mother, she "got a notice saying she wasn't qualified" for the job she had sought as a work leader on the park's Youth Conservation Corps. Then Lynne Cheney called park Supt.
OPINION
September 18, 1988
In response to the editorial "Cooling the Fire (Sept. 13): Your editorial is the first sensible commentary I've read in several weeks. Nature, tragically, combined every negative element, i.e., years of drought, low humidity, high winds and a kiln-dried forest, and then defied man to extinguish the holocaust. I attended the Sept. 6 daily fire-line update in west Yellowstone and learned that at that moment $73.8 million had already been spent for equipment and 9,235 dedicated men and women firefighters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1988
National park and forest officials have taken a lot of heat, so to speak, over their management--or the lack of it--of fires that have swept across hundreds of thousands of acres of Western lands this summer. Some of the flap is justified in view of the drought conditions this year. In retrospect, it seems that to have let nature take its course in such volatile fire conditions was asking for trouble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1989
The appointment of a career National Park Service official as superintendent of Yosemite National Park has, happily, squelched for now fears that politics would be injected into the selection of administrators of the nation's two oldest and most-revered national parks, Yosemite and Yellowstone. But that does not mean the job facing 42-year-old Michael V. Finley will not require a leader with a keen political sense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1988
The Yellowstone Park firestorm is burning its way toward the Interior Department building in Washington now. Critics led by Sen. Malcolm Wallop (R-Wyo.) are demanding, at the very least, the resignations of National Park Service Director William Penn Mott and Yellowstone Supt. Robert Barbee. There even has been talk of axing Secretary of the Interior Donald P. Hodel. It is time, however, to build a little backfire of common sense.
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | BOB SECTER and TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writers
Authorities ordered the evacuation of Yellowstone National Park headquarters at Mammoth Hot Springs as well as other populated areas Saturday, as wind-whipped wildfires raced across half of the nation's oldest nature preserve.
NEWS
September 12, 1988 | TAMARA JONES and BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writers
Snow showers, plunging temperatures and dying winds Sunday handed exhausted firefighters their first victory in the two-month battle to save Yellowstone National Park. But worried officials warned that the inferno is still "a sleeping giant." The break in weather gave crews their first chance all summer to launch a direct frontal attack on the blazes that have stormed across more than 1.2 million acres in and around the nation's oldest and most popular park.
NEWS
November 2, 1987 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
Once gunned down on sight or poisoned with strychnine-laced bait, the endangered Rocky Mountain gray wolf is trying to make a comeback in this remote valley on the North Fork of the Flathead River. The howls of a wolf pack--unheard in the West for half a century--are once more echoing off the stony peaks in Glacier National Park. Biologists tracking this group report that individual wolves have recently split away from the pack to form two more packs that are now ranging nearby, along the U.S.
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