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Robert Bartley

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2003 | Jon Thurber and Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writers
Robert Bartley, the former editorial page editor of the Wall Street Journal and a leading voice in conservative thought in American politics, died Wednesday of cancer at a New York City hospital. He was 66. Bartley, who was credited by many with turning the Journal's editorial page into a bulletin board for the political right, won a Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing in 1980. He guided editorial opinion at the journal for more than 30 years, becoming editor emeritus in January 2003.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2003 | Jon Thurber and Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writers
Robert Bartley, the former editorial page editor of the Wall Street Journal and a leading voice in conservative thought in American politics, died Wednesday of cancer at a New York City hospital. He was 66. Bartley, who was credited by many with turning the Journal's editorial page into a bulletin board for the political right, won a Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing in 1980. He guided editorial opinion at the journal for more than 30 years, becoming editor emeritus in January 2003.
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NEWS
March 12, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Amid revolution, one thing at the Wall Street Journal is unchanged: The independent nation-state of conservative Robert Bartley--the editorial pages. Bartley's pages--strident, gutsy, infuriating or inspirational (depending on one's philosophy)--operate something like a naughty smart kid in school, pestering conservatives not to yield and seeking to humble liberals at every turn. "By far the best editorial page . . . in the world," said Commentary Editor Norman Podhoretz, fittingly unequivocal.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | James Flanigan, Flanigan is a Times business columnist.
This is an unfashionable, even outrageous book. It says that the supply side economics of the Reagan years, now being blamed for the burning of Los Angeles among other ills of our country, were the best thing to happen to the U.S. economy in decades. We would profit from an encore, argues the author. "The Seven Fat Years" has been dismissed as a polemic in Business Week but praised as a book of the year in Forbes.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | James Flanigan, Flanigan is a Times business columnist.
This is an unfashionable, even outrageous book. It says that the supply side economics of the Reagan years, now being blamed for the burning of Los Angeles among other ills of our country, were the best thing to happen to the U.S. economy in decades. We would profit from an encore, argues the author. "The Seven Fat Years" has been dismissed as a polemic in Business Week but praised as a book of the year in Forbes.
MAGAZINE
December 23, 1990
To name Robert L. Bartley of the Wall Street Journal and Michael Novak of the American Enterprise Institute is like nominating an arsonist for fire chief. This country is in an economic decline, our industry is debilitated and we face a crisis of the whole financial structure of the country; yet you cite two representatives of the puerile, discredited policies that have sold out our industrial strength for junk bonds, sentenced our taxpayers to losses of $500 billion (just for starters)
NATIONAL
June 24, 2004 | Kathleen Hennessey, Times Staff Writer
Flanked by a lineup of accomplished scholars, an entertainer, an ophthalmologist and a golfer with his own army of fans, President Bush awarded 13 Presidential Medals of Freedom on Wednesday. The nation's highest civilian honor went to, among others, "West Side Story" star Rita Moreno, retired professional golfer Arnold Palmer, conservative intellectuals Robert Bartley and Norman Podhoretz, financier Walter Wriston, president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Gordon B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What relationship should the press have with the presidency? It's an issue that troubled even Thomas Jefferson and is, judging by comments from a panel of well-known journalists and politicians at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library on Thursday, one that continues to confound the American public.
NEWS
March 2, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
Senate Democrats appeared Wednesday to be rallying around Armed Services Committee Chairman Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) in the wake of Republican attacks on his fairness and a newspaper report of a drunken driving incident he was involved in 24 years ago. The attacks on Nunn escalated Tuesday when the Wall Street Journal editorial page took the unusual step of reprinting a 1972 article from the Atlanta Journal on the automobile accident.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Amid revolution, one thing at the Wall Street Journal is unchanged: The independent nation-state of conservative Robert Bartley--the editorial pages. Bartley's pages--strident, gutsy, infuriating or inspirational (depending on one's philosophy)--operate something like a naughty smart kid in school, pestering conservatives not to yield and seeking to humble liberals at every turn. "By far the best editorial page . . . in the world," said Commentary Editor Norman Podhoretz, fittingly unequivocal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2003 | DAVID SHAW
Coverage of antiwar protests across the globe has triggered anew complaints among conservatives that the mainstream news media have a liberal bias. Of course, conservatives have been making that complaint for the past 50 years. Eric Alterman says they were right -- 50 years ago. And as recently as 22 years ago. But not today. Alterman, an avowed liberal, is a columnist for the Nation magazine and the author of a new book, "What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News."
NEWS
January 27, 2002 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
C. W. Meisterfeld doesn't want to sound judgmental, but, he says, people are like dogs. Now, if Vince Lombardi or Martha Stewart had posited this, it might be a condemnation. But the observation comes from the "Dog Whisperer," and he's not judging; he's just stating how things are. There's no good or bad here. The longtime Petaluma dog trainer believes that neither men nor beasts can be their best--or even well behaved--if they are constantly being judged.
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