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NEWS
February 21, 1997 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's always tricky having a party after the premiere of a gravely serious film. The eloquent portrayal of death and suffering rarely serves as suitable hors d'oeuvres. Wednesday's screening of "Miss Evers' Boys" would be a classic example. HBO's two-hour drama, based on the Pulitzer-nominated play by David Feldshuh, tells of the U.S. Public Health Service's notorious "Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2000 | PAMELA DIAMOND
The event: The 10th anniversary of Christmas Tree Magic, an annual luncheon/auction featuring holiday trees decorated by local designers. This year's event, held Sunday at the Hyatt Regency Irvine, benefited Children's Hospital of Orange County, the Orange County Ronald McDonald House, Make-A-Wish Foundation and United Cerebral Palsy of Orange County.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
In 1980, when it was first produced at California Institute of the Arts, director / adapter Robert Benedetti's walking tour through Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" might have been a theatrical innovation. Since then, theater has seen other walking tours, through the politically alive "Tamara," and various weddings and funerals, all of which blasted theater's fourth wall to smithereens. They also had viable dramatic bases.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
The question begged by all revivals is that of relevance. The question begged by the revival of "The Cradle Will Rock" at the San Diego Repertory Theatre through July 23 is why modern audiences should care about a federally funded 1937 musical that was canceled by the government because it was pro-union. The play ended up being staged elsewhere without scenery or costumes by a cast determined to do its work and an audience determined to see it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson
Karen Black, the bravely offbeat actress who burst into the public consciousness in such iconic counterculture films as "Five Easy Pieces" and "Easy Rider," has died. She was 74. Black, who was found to have ampullary cancer in 2010, died Thursday at West Hills Hospital, said her husband, Stephen Eckelberry. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article said Black died at the West Hills Health and Rehabilitation Center in Canoga Park. She died at West Hills Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
In these days when we're told that unionism has gone the way of the 10-cent cup of coffee and the bosses are firmly in control, along comes CalArts staging Marc Blitzstein's opera on the triumph of the working man, "The Cradle Will Rock." The last in the three play "CalArts In Town" festival at the Morgan Wixson Theater, Robert Benedetti's production is full of spunky college students who you'd think wouldn't know a Wobbly from Pee-wee Herman. Nonsense.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
For Robert Ziegler, there is a certain amount of irony involved in his impending Monday Evening Concert. After all, the London-based conductor--who is leading a program of British music as part of the UK/LA '88 Festival--is a Los Angeles native. More than six years ago, the locally trained musician moved his career to London. "I found the opportunities in Los Angeles for what I wanted to do a bit limited," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Death always tormented Edgar Allan Poe and Mary Shelley--two literary pioneers who gave the world the dark side almost two centuries before Stephen King. Poe wrote poetry, Shelley penned "Frankenstein." They never met, but starting April 5 they will appear on stage in "Demons & Angels," two separate one-act plays that, according to playwright Cynthia Lee, will probe the motivation of these two 19th-Century writers.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
HBO's new movie, "Miss Evers' Boys," examines one of the saddest chapters in American history. Adapted by Walter Bernstein ("The Front") from David Feldshuh's Pulitzer Prize-nominated 1989 play, "Miss Evers' Boys" chronicles the story of how the U.S. government withheld treatment for 40 years from a group of African American men infected with syphilis, in order to study the course of the disease.
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