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Robert Benton

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
Robert Benton is so self-effacing that he once joked that "I'm like Dracula -- I don't leave a trace in the mirror." He's much happier talking about his favorite filmmakers and actors than about himself, saying, "I'm shaped by who I collaborate with." When Benton was making "The Late Show," an early critical success, he recalls Robert Altman admonishing him, "Trust your actors. There'll come a point in the picture where they'll know more about the character than you do.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Love is a many-splendored thing in Robert Benton's dull romantic fantasy "Feast of Love," though none of its splendors rings true. That's because in the Arcadian, storybook Portland, Ore., in which the movie is set, love is a simple binary system -- it's either on or off, pure or compromised, hot or age-appropriately snuggly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1988 | MICHAEL WILIMINGTON, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
*** "Still of the Night" MGM-UA. $29.95. This thriller--about a susceptible psychiatrist (Roy Scheider) following an ice-blonde femme fatale and suspected murderess (Meryl Streep) through a maze of blind alleys and menace--is one of the more successful of the many Hitchcockian pastiches. Maybe it's because the personality of writer-director Robert Benton is so far from Hitchcock's, more open and generous; the twists seem to get a new edge.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2007 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
Robert Benton is so self-effacing that he once joked that "I'm like Dracula -- I don't leave a trace in the mirror." He's much happier talking about his favorite filmmakers and actors than about himself, saying, "I'm shaped by who I collaborate with." When Benton was making "The Late Show," an early critical success, he recalls Robert Altman admonishing him, "Trust your actors. There'll come a point in the picture where they'll know more about the character than you do.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1991 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Dustin Hoffman is disappointed in the outcome of "Billy Bathgate." Speaking to The Times on the Chicago set of "Hero," Hoffman said about the film: "We (Hoffman and director Robert Benton) had an agreement that it'd be the same kind of working relationship we had in 'Kramer vs. Kramer,' " Hoffman said. "We'd be partners. I told him there were certain things I didn't like going in, but he said we'd be able to work it out in re-shooting."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1991 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is as if Robert Benton stumbled into his own picture only to have Dutch Schultz and his boys speed by and open fire with submachine guns. But instead of bullets, the Oscar-winning director has been dodging rapid-fire rumors and criticism. On Friday, "Billy Bathgate," Benton's long-awaited gangster film for Disney's Touchstone Pictures, opens nationwide. For months, the talk around Hollywood has labeled it a problem picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2007 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
Love is a many-splendored thing in Robert Benton's dull romantic fantasy "Feast of Love," though none of its splendors rings true. That's because in the Arcadian, storybook Portland, Ore., in which the movie is set, love is a simple binary system -- it's either on or off, pure or compromised, hot or age-appropriately snuggly.
SPORTS
July 18, 1991 | TIM KAWAKAMI
Ram Coach John Robinson says this season's training camp will be much different from those in years past. "It's going to be very competitive," Robinson said, just before the team meeting that opened camp at UC Irvine. "It's competitive at corner and at safety, at outside linebacker and inside linebacker, at defensive end. At defensive tackle--not much depth there. The depth is young, so there isn't probably the depth to compete there. So that's a big concern.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | Kevin Thomas
Robert Benton's fine, funny and sad 1977 film noir stars Art Carney (pictured) and Lily Tomlin as an aging Hollywood private eye and a flaky L.A. woman. There's much shrewd but affectionate satire of the Hammett-Chandler archetypes, and the film, in its warmth, wit and unpretentiousness, lingers in the memory far more strongly than lots of the decade's supposedly more important pictures (KCOP early Saturday at 2:30 a.m.).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Date for 'Bathgate': Disney's Touchstone Pictures will finally release its much-delayed "Billy Bathgate," starring Dustin Hoffman, on Nov. 1. The big-budgeted film, with Hoffman as legendary gangster Dutch Schultz, is based on E.L. Doctorow's novel, directed by Robert Benton, with a screenplay by Tom Stoppard.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1991 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
Dustin Hoffman is disappointed in the outcome of "Billy Bathgate." Speaking to The Times on the Chicago set of "Hero," Hoffman said about the film: "We (Hoffman and director Robert Benton) had an agreement that it'd be the same kind of working relationship we had in 'Kramer vs. Kramer,' " Hoffman said. "We'd be partners. I told him there were certain things I didn't like going in, but he said we'd be able to work it out in re-shooting."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1991 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is as if Robert Benton stumbled into his own picture only to have Dutch Schultz and his boys speed by and open fire with submachine guns. But instead of bullets, the Oscar-winning director has been dodging rapid-fire rumors and criticism. On Friday, "Billy Bathgate," Benton's long-awaited gangster film for Disney's Touchstone Pictures, opens nationwide. For months, the talk around Hollywood has labeled it a problem picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1988 | MICHAEL WILIMINGTON, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
*** "Still of the Night" MGM-UA. $29.95. This thriller--about a susceptible psychiatrist (Roy Scheider) following an ice-blonde femme fatale and suspected murderess (Meryl Streep) through a maze of blind alleys and menace--is one of the more successful of the many Hitchcockian pastiches. Maybe it's because the personality of writer-director Robert Benton is so far from Hitchcock's, more open and generous; the twists seem to get a new edge.
NEWS
May 4, 1997 | Kevin Thomas
Back in 1958, long before he became an esteemed filmmaker, Robert Benton decided to gather all the jazz musicians he possibly could for a group photo, taken by the late Art Kane, in front of a Harlem brownstone for an Esquire cover story on the golden age of jazz. Documentarian Jean Bach has been no less inspired than Benton in getting the surviving musicians to speak of those who have died--legends like Thelonius Monk, Lester Young, Charles Mingus and Pee Wee Russell.
NEWS
June 25, 1995 | Peter Rainer
This 1979 multi-Oscar winner--it won for Best Picture, Actor, Director, Screenplay, and Supporting Actress--was one of the first of the touchy-feely Sensitive Guy movies. Dustin Hoffman drew on a thick fund of sympathy playing a single father, and Meryl Streep, as his ex-wife, became the villain of the piece.
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