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Robert Bernstein

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. Robert Bernstein, 87, an Army physician who served as commander of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in the 1970s and later became Texas Commissioner of Health, died Monday at a hospital in Austin after a battle with leukemia and other health problems, said friend and colleague Camille D. Miller, chief executive of the Texas Health Institute. Bernstein served as an Army surgeon in Japan and Korea starting in the late 1940s.
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OPINION
September 16, 2009
"Tough stand on Malibu home," Sept 12, and "Bank fires exec who allegedly used home," Sept. 15 If the allegations in The Times are true, then I've got to hand it to this senior VP who, when faced with a choice of foreclosed Wells Fargo homes in Merced, Stockton, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, chose instead a multimillion-dollar beachfront home in Malibu. When looking for our next home, you can rest assured that I will contact this most perceptive Wells Fargo executive. How could I go wrong?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. Robert Bernstein, 87, an Army physician who served as commander of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in the 1970s and later became Texas Commissioner of Health, died Monday at a hospital in Austin after a battle with leukemia and other health problems, said friend and colleague Camille D. Miller, chief executive of the Texas Health Institute. Bernstein served as an Army surgeon in Japan and Korea starting in the late 1940s.
OPINION
September 16, 2009
"Tough stand on Malibu home," Sept 12, and "Bank fires exec who allegedly used home," Sept. 15 If the allegations in The Times are true, then I've got to hand it to this senior VP who, when faced with a choice of foreclosed Wells Fargo homes in Merced, Stockton, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, chose instead a multimillion-dollar beachfront home in Malibu. When looking for our next home, you can rest assured that I will contact this most perceptive Wells Fargo executive. How could I go wrong?
BUSINESS
November 2, 1989
It is amazing to me that an attorney is so willing to give up a person's right to a "fair trial" in exchange for a fast and cost-effective, albeit fair trial. As examples of the abuses of the system, he cites the McMartin and Night Stalker trials. These cases are the exception not the rule. Justice is not perfect. Judges do a remarkable job of protecting our "rights" while balancing their calendars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
What's art got to do with it? A lot more than people generally think. To educators fighting over school budgets, art and music frequently are viewed as frills that drain funds from more serious subjects like math and science. But scientists and mathematicians know different. In fact, they often rely on aesthetics to guide their research, filter their perceptions and help them visualize patterns in the sometimes impenetrable chaos of data.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Porsche, the parties, and the Cancun beaches she savored as a newly rich widow now only a memory, Mary Ellen Samuels sat stunned Thursday as a jury recommended that she be executed for orchestrating the murders of her estranged husband and the man she hired to kill him. A hush fell over the packed Van Nuys courtroom as the jury delivered the verdict. Samuels, 45, did not change expressions as a court clerk read the verdict of the jury--reached after two days of deliberations.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | Associated Press
State Health Commissioner Robert Bernstein on Thursday dropped his proposal to add AIDS to the list of diseases for which Texans could be quarantined. The proposal, tentatively approved last month by the state health board, drew heated criticism from homosexual organizations and civil rights groups. It was that opposition, voiced at a public hearing last Monday, that moved Bernstein to drop his proposal.
NEWS
April 6, 1989
One of the highest ranking and most decorated black officers in the California National Guard has been cleared of allegations of sexual and financial improprieties. Lt. Col Ezell Ware Jr., 48, succeeded in retaining his commission and is working full time as a staff assistant in the California Guard headquarters. A panel of four officers recommended last year that he be stripped of his reserve commission. But the California National Guard commander, Maj. Gen.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1989
It is amazing to me that an attorney is so willing to give up a person's right to a "fair trial" in exchange for a fast and cost-effective, albeit fair trial. As examples of the abuses of the system, he cites the McMartin and Night Stalker trials. These cases are the exception not the rule. Justice is not perfect. Judges do a remarkable job of protecting our "rights" while balancing their calendars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1985
Soviet officials have again betrayed their fear of ideas, free expression and open exchange, and have again violated their commitment to those very elements of the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe signed in Helsinki 10 years ago. The latest evidence of the Soviet Union's defiance of the Helsinki accords came in the denial of visas for two Americans who had been planning to attend the Moscow Book Fair next week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1996 | ERIC WAHLGREN
The local chapter of a support group for families of gays and lesbians will present a speaker in Ventura tonight who will talk about parents and gay children. Robert Bernstein, a former law professor and freelance writer from Maryland, will address the public at 7 p.m. at the Church of the Foothills, 6279 Foothill Road.
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