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Robert Best

ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2005 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
For HIRE: diminutive, silver-haired, 71-year-old television and movie actor. Known as a perfectionist and loner. Skilled at playing tough guys. Cops his specialty. Please, no villain roles at this time. After six decades as a Hollywood actor, Robert Blake, best known as the Emmy-winning 1970s television detective Baretta, would like to get back to work. "I'm broke," he told a news conference last week shortly after a jury acquitted him of killing his wife, Bonny Lee Bakley. "I need a job."
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BUSINESS
June 7, 1992 | Associated Press
* Shinji Sakai, a 30-year veteran of Toyota Motor Corp., will succeed Yuki Togo as president and chief executive of the firm's Torrance-based U.S. operations, the auto maker said. Togo, 67, will become chairman of Toyota Motor Sales USA. Yale Gieszl was named executive vice president, succeeding Bob McCurry, who was named vice chairman.
MAGAZINE
September 13, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic and former book-review editor
ELEGANT CARS GLIDING THROUGH A DECAYING infrastructure, the dispossessed huddling in the shadow of bright skyscrapers, the sensation of a dystopian, multiethnic civilization that has managed to simultaneously advance and regress--these are scenes of modern urban decline, and if they make you think of a movie, and chances are they will, it can have only one name: "Blade Runner." Few, if any, motion pictures have the gift of predicting the future as well as crystallizing an indelible image of it, but that is the key to "Blade Runner's" accomplishments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1989
A handful of Calabasas residents sarcastically saluted five public officials Monday in a staged event they hope will help halt a Ventura Freeway project. Although none of the five officials were present for the "black hat awards" at the historic Leonis Adobe, members of the Coalition to Save Old Town Calabasas said they intended to hand-deliver the prizes--black cowboy hats and certificates issued for "profound indifference to the needs and desires of the citizens of Calabasas."
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | United Press International
Many plants that shriveled up during the winter cold snap or the drought will not be replaced along the state's landscaped freeways because of the severe water shortage, the California Department of Transportation said Tuesday. The action is one of several steps announced by Caltrans to reduce the amount of water used by the agency during the state's fifth year of drought.
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