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Robert Bloch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Bloch, a master of the macabre who made the word psycho synonymous with mental disorders and chilling entertainment, has died at his Los Angeles home. Harlan Ellison, his longtime friend and fellow author, said Saturday that Bloch--who was writing of grisly doings decades before Hannibal Lecter savored his first victim--was 74. "The death of Robert Bloch closes that door on the Golden Age of fantasy writing," said Ellison, another noted writer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Few directors put up as convincing a mask as Alfred Hitchcock or were as adept at using that public face to sell their work to the wider world. But what was the master of suspense really like in his private moments? Do we even want to know? With Anthony Hopkins as the great helmsman and Helen Mirren as Alma Reville, his wife of more than 50 years, "Hitchcock" puts major league star power at the service of its peek-behind-closed-doors premise. But whatever that relationship was like in real life, this is one cinematic portrait of a marriage we could have lived without.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1986
I imagine several readers will inform your photo-caption writer that Vilma Banky did not adore Valentino in "The Sheik." It was Agnes Ayres who did the adoring, while Banky took over in "The Son of the Sheik." But I wonder how many will also pass the word that Valentino does not play an Arab in either film. Although raised as an Arab and given an Arab name, he turns out to be 100% Aryan--in fact he's an English lord, just like Tarzan, and thus legally entitled to rape and even marry a Nordic blonde.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Bloch, a master of the macabre who made the word psycho synonymous with mental disorders and chilling entertainment, has died at his Los Angeles home. Harlan Ellison, his longtime friend and fellow author, said Saturday that Bloch--who was writing of grisly doings decades before Hannibal Lecter savored his first victim--was 74. "The death of Robert Bloch closes that door on the Golden Age of fantasy writing," said Ellison, another noted writer.
NEWS
May 30, 1987 | TERRY BROOKS, Terry Brooks is the author of the fantasy adventure novel "Magic Kingdom for Sale/Sold" (Del Rey). and
Lost in Time and Space With Lefty Feep by Robert Bloch (Creatures at Large, 1082 Grand Teton Drive, Pacifica, Calif. 94044: $12.95, paperback; $40, limited edition hard cover; 258 pp., illustrated) Robert Bloch is probably best known as the creator of "Psycho," the horror novel that dispatched forever a good number of its characters and, in the process, our complacency toward sleepy roadside motels and steamed-over shower stalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1990
A couple of points about "Hitchcock's Throwaway Masterpiece," Marc Shapiro's May 27 article about the movie "Psycho": Ed Gein, the murderer on whom director Alfred Hitchcock's classic horror thriller was loosely based, wasn't from Michigan (as indicated in the article). He lived on a farm outside Plainfield, a town of about 600 people in central Wisconsin. While I'm a Hitchcock fan and thoroughly enjoyed "Psycho," the true story of Gein is at least as interesting as the movie's story.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Few directors put up as convincing a mask as Alfred Hitchcock or were as adept at using that public face to sell their work to the wider world. But what was the master of suspense really like in his private moments? Do we even want to know? With Anthony Hopkins as the great helmsman and Helen Mirren as Alma Reville, his wife of more than 50 years, "Hitchcock" puts major league star power at the service of its peek-behind-closed-doors premise. But whatever that relationship was like in real life, this is one cinematic portrait of a marriage we could have lived without.
BOOKS
September 30, 2007
Susan Salter Reynolds reviews "The Florist's Daughter" by Patricia Hampl. Tim Rutten reviews "The Gathering," a novel by Anne Enright. The following reviews are scheduled: Edward Lazarus reviews "My Grandfather's Son: A Memoir" by Clarence Thomas. Reed Johnson reviews "Revolution of Hope: The Life, Faith, and Dreams of a Mexican President" by Vicente Fox and Rob Allyn. Nicholas A. Basbanes reviews "The Journal of Dora Damage," a novel by Belinda Starling. On the Web This week at latimes.
NEWS
October 27, 1997
The Penguin Book of Vampire Stories, edited by Alan Ryan (Penguin Books, 622 pages, $14.95). Thirty-two selections, from Lord Byron's "Fragment of a Novel" (1816) to Tanith Lee's "Bite-Me-Not or, Fleur De Feu" (1984), to Fritz Leiber's "The Girl With the Hungry Eyes," and stories by Algernon Blackwood, Richard Matheson, Charles Beaumont, Robert Bloch and the main man himself, Bram Stoker. Includes lists of vampire novels and vampire movies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1988
More than $40,000 was raised for San Pedro Peninsula Hospital by 100 walkers, joggers and runners at the hospital foundation's recent seventh annual Jog-Walk-a-Thon. The money will be used to buy monitoring equipment for the hospital's intensive care unit. The equipment will monitor such things as breathing, heart rates and blood pressure. The top fund-raiser at the June 4 event on the track at San Pedro High School was Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1990
A couple of points about "Hitchcock's Throwaway Masterpiece," Marc Shapiro's May 27 article about the movie "Psycho": Ed Gein, the murderer on whom director Alfred Hitchcock's classic horror thriller was loosely based, wasn't from Michigan (as indicated in the article). He lived on a farm outside Plainfield, a town of about 600 people in central Wisconsin. While I'm a Hitchcock fan and thoroughly enjoyed "Psycho," the true story of Gein is at least as interesting as the movie's story.
NEWS
May 30, 1987 | TERRY BROOKS, Terry Brooks is the author of the fantasy adventure novel "Magic Kingdom for Sale/Sold" (Del Rey). and
Lost in Time and Space With Lefty Feep by Robert Bloch (Creatures at Large, 1082 Grand Teton Drive, Pacifica, Calif. 94044: $12.95, paperback; $40, limited edition hard cover; 258 pp., illustrated) Robert Bloch is probably best known as the creator of "Psycho," the horror novel that dispatched forever a good number of its characters and, in the process, our complacency toward sleepy roadside motels and steamed-over shower stalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1986
I imagine several readers will inform your photo-caption writer that Vilma Banky did not adore Valentino in "The Sheik." It was Agnes Ayres who did the adoring, while Banky took over in "The Son of the Sheik." But I wonder how many will also pass the word that Valentino does not play an Arab in either film. Although raised as an Arab and given an Arab name, he turns out to be 100% Aryan--in fact he's an English lord, just like Tarzan, and thus legally entitled to rape and even marry a Nordic blonde.
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