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Robert Bolt

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NEWS
February 23, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Bolt, the British playwright who turned to screenwriting and won Academy Awards for the scripts of "Dr. Zhivago" and "A Man for All Seasons," has died. He was 70. Bolt, who garnered a third Oscar nomination for his screenplay of "Lawrence of Arabia," died Monday night at his home near Petersfield, 70 miles southwest of London. The writer had a history of heart problems and had been partially disabled since a heart attack and stroke in 1983.
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NEWS
February 23, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Bolt, the British playwright who turned to screenwriting and won Academy Awards for the scripts of "Dr. Zhivago" and "A Man for All Seasons," has died. He was 70. Bolt, who garnered a third Oscar nomination for his screenplay of "Lawrence of Arabia," died Monday night at his home near Petersfield, 70 miles southwest of London. The writer had a history of heart problems and had been partially disabled since a heart attack and stroke in 1983.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1986 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Six years ago Robert Bolt underwent open heart surgery here in Los Angeles. A few hours after the operation he suffered a massive stroke that left him unable to speak or to move for two years. But, thanks to "some lovely nurses," the constant but hard-line encouragement of his wife, Sarah Miles, and his own stubborn determination, Bolt is back on active duty. "You made up your mind to fight. You willed it," Miles said at breakfast in their suite at a hotel in Beverly Hills earlier this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1991
Congratulations for a lively, tell-it-like-it-is portrait of screenwriter and stroke victim Robert Bolt ("Writing for His Life," by David Gritten, June 9). Be he abrasive, egocentric or sometimes just plain nasty, I can't help admiring a gutsy talent who will poke fun at his own speech handicap along with that of former White House Press Secretary James Brady. Historians will, I hope, cherish Bolt's White House anecdote about his and Brady's struggle with their respective impediments to get through to a hard-of-hearing Ronald Reagan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a free-lance writer based in New York who writes regularly for The Times.
It was 12 years ago when Robert Bolt, a big, bearlike man full of life and wit and terrific conversation, was cut down in his prime by a severe stroke. Bolt, one of the most lauded screenwriters in film history, was left paralyzed down the right side of his body, and could not walk or talk for two years. Since then his life has been a long, gradual process of recovery. He still has problems in articulating, but his mind never stopped ticking.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1988
Writing to critics is a mug's game. As Mencken (I think), said, "Never argue with people who buy ink by the barrel." Nevertheless: Terry Atkinson is obviously entitled to, indeed paid for, his opinion of our film "A Man for All Seasons." His conclusions still seem to me shallowly reasoned, the faded bouquets tossed notwithstanding. A play of the quality of Robert Bolt's extraordinary work (I don't know of one as well written in the generation since) is, of course, going to be redone.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1991
Congratulations for a lively, tell-it-like-it-is portrait of screenwriter and stroke victim Robert Bolt ("Writing for His Life," by David Gritten, June 9). Be he abrasive, egocentric or sometimes just plain nasty, I can't help admiring a gutsy talent who will poke fun at his own speech handicap along with that of former White House Press Secretary James Brady. Historians will, I hope, cherish Bolt's White House anecdote about his and Brady's struggle with their respective impediments to get through to a hard-of-hearing Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
Dame Wendy Hiller is one of England's national treasures. At the ripe young age of 80, she is still performing and stars with Sir John Gielgud and Patrick McGoohan in Hugh Whitemore's drama "The Best of Friends," premiering Sunday on PBS' "Masterpiece Theatre."
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | Michael Wilmington
T.H. Lawrence, enigmatic adventurer, is the focus of David Lean's beautifully photographed epic--shot by Freddie Young and Nicolas Roeg. Literate, serious, full of sweep and action, and--though Lean and writers Robert Bolt and (uncredited) Michael Wilson are too literal to penetrate fully the Seven Pillarsof Wisdom--still a deluxe, gorgeous adventure.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1991
Times staff writer Nina J. Easton's article on ageism and writers in film and television ("Hey, Babes! How Old Is Too Old for Hollywood?," Nov. 17) has produced an usually large response from readers. A sampling of their views appears here and on the facing page: There is indeed a problem when talented, vital people are refused work simply because of their age. Unfortunately, Easton is right when she cites many in the industry as perpetrators of ageism. However, she also refers to an observed "general pattern of discrimination . . . particularly in TV."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a free-lance writer based in New York who writes regularly for The Times.
It was 12 years ago when Robert Bolt, a big, bearlike man full of life and wit and terrific conversation, was cut down in his prime by a severe stroke. Bolt, one of the most lauded screenwriters in film history, was left paralyzed down the right side of his body, and could not walk or talk for two years. Since then his life has been a long, gradual process of recovery. He still has problems in articulating, but his mind never stopped ticking.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1988
Writing to critics is a mug's game. As Mencken (I think), said, "Never argue with people who buy ink by the barrel." Nevertheless: Terry Atkinson is obviously entitled to, indeed paid for, his opinion of our film "A Man for All Seasons." His conclusions still seem to me shallowly reasoned, the faded bouquets tossed notwithstanding. A play of the quality of Robert Bolt's extraordinary work (I don't know of one as well written in the generation since) is, of course, going to be redone.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1986 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
Six years ago Robert Bolt underwent open heart surgery here in Los Angeles. A few hours after the operation he suffered a massive stroke that left him unable to speak or to move for two years. But, thanks to "some lovely nurses," the constant but hard-line encouragement of his wife, Sarah Miles, and his own stubborn determination, Bolt is back on active duty. "You made up your mind to fight. You willed it," Miles said at breakfast in their suite at a hotel in Beverly Hills earlier this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
Michael Bryant, whose subtlety and power onstage made him a favorite of critics and audiences during nearly 25 years of acting at the National Theatre in London, has died. The actor was 74. Bryant died at his home in Richmond, southwest of London, on April 25, a statement from the theater said. It did not give the cause of death. Bryant threw himself into both starring and supporting roles, quickly becoming one of the National's strongest and most reliable actors after his debut there in 1977.
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