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Robert Bonfiglio

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To most people, the harmonica may be at home on the range, in smoke-filled joints or even in jail cells, but it would seem misplaced in the polite company of symphonic instruments. Harmonica player Robert Bonfiglio continued his quest for parity on Wednesday at the Fullerton First United Methodist Church in a performance sponsored by the North Orange County Community Concerts Assn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1993 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To most people, the harmonica may be at home on the range, in smoke-filled joints or even in jail cells, but it would seem misplaced in the polite company of symphonic instruments. Harmonica player Robert Bonfiglio continued his quest for parity on Wednesday at the Fullerton First United Methodist Church in a performance sponsored by the North Orange County Community Concerts Assn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES
Are you ready for a Bach concerto played on a harmonica? Why not, asks Robert Bonfiglio. "The instrument is really not as limited as people think," says the harmonica virtuoso. "Basically, the work is going to sound different, but not less musically viable, which is the true key to all transcriptions. I refuse to play something that could be played better on some other instrument."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1993 | CHRIS PASLES
Are you ready for a Bach concerto played on a harmonica? Why not, asks Robert Bonfiglio. "The instrument is really not as limited as people think," says the harmonica virtuoso. "Basically, the work is going to sound different, but not less musically viable, which is the true key to all transcriptions. I refuse to play something that could be played better on some other instrument."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990 | WILLIAM RATLIFF
A one-hour program of satisfying curios. The 20-minute concerto is followed by transcriptions of the aria from "Bachianas Brasileiras" No. 5 and 13 shorter songs and movements. Bonfiglio plays with a sweet lyricism, grace and vitality one rarely associates with the harmonica. The orchestral support is balanced and in full sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1999
The 1999-2000 season of the Long Beach Symphony, its 65th, will offer a seven-concert Classics series, a four-event Pops series and introduce Holiday Concerts, also in the Terrace Theater at the Long Beach Performing Arts Center. Music Director JoAnn Falletta will conduct six of the seven Classics programs, beginning Oct. 16, when Andre-Michel Schub plays Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3 on a program also listing John Luther Adams' "The Time of Drumming" and Brahms' First Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1992 | LEWIS SEGAL
On the way to its inevitable fireworks finale, John Mauceri's "Great American Concert" at Hollywood Bowl on Friday and Saturday wrapped a pile of show-biz scores in the mantle of "E Pluribus Unum." To be fair, the evening did offer a few intriguing perspectives on Americana: Brazilian Heitor Villa-Lobos looking back at European culture in an excerpt from "Bachianas Brasileiras" No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2002 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In honor of Arbor Day today, Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn displayed the first of about 5,000 shade trees Thursday that will be planted along Sepulveda Boulevard from Mission Hills to Harbor City. "This is not only going to beautify the area, but will help clean up air pollution and provide shade, which will help with energy conservation," Hahn told residents and city officials gathered along a median in Van Nuys, where 27 purple leaf plum trees were planted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2009 | Veronique de Turenne
The ideals of Aristotle are alive and thriving in a gritty corner of Baldwin Hills. Bordered by the concrete expanse where La Brea Avenue meets Rodeo Road lies a 64-acre oasis. Its vast lawns and towering trees are rimmed by modest apartments, which, by their very nature, create community. This is Village Green, built in 1941, a celebrated example of a utopian movement in multi-family development. Based on the Radburn plan, a community idea that drew inspiration from the Garden City movement of the late 19th century, it was a revolution in urban planning.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
In the way that small towns sometimes do, Santa Barbara is packaging its regular performing arts events this month grandly as the 1998 Midwinter Music Festival. But the Santa Barbara Symphony, which has an enterprising music director, took the marketing seriously Saturday night. It offered the American premiere of the little-known last work, the major ballet "La Coronela," by the great Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990 | WILLIAM RATLIFF
A one-hour program of satisfying curios. The 20-minute concerto is followed by transcriptions of the aria from "Bachianas Brasileiras" No. 5 and 13 shorter songs and movements. Bonfiglio plays with a sweet lyricism, grace and vitality one rarely associates with the harmonica. The orchestral support is balanced and in full sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA
"I'm just a little bit apprehensive," says American pianist Richard Goode, facing his first appearance at Hollywood Bowl, Thursday night. "I've played outdoors only a few times, and I worry about things--like being heard." The winner of an Avery Fisher Award in 1980 and a Grammy in 1982 is not characteristically nervous, he assures us. But his scheduled performance of Mozart's G-major Concerto, K.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1987 | MARC SHULGOLD
The ongoing Hollywood Bowl face lift has yielded another crop of improvements to the venerable amphitheater, which unofficially opens its doors for its 66th summer tonight. Concertgoers will find another generation of benches, newly spiffed-up boxes and new anti-aircraft installations: the little things that mean so much. But officials at the Bowl and the Los Angeles Philharmonic are also thinking big these days.
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