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Robert Bonner

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NEWS
March 28, 1986
Two Southland men rigged bids on testing equipment in a scheme to defraud the Navy of $200,000, U.S. Atty. Robert Bonner charged in a civil complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Bonner said Donald B. Schneider, 63, of Arcadia, and Fritz Egger, 49, of Rancho Palos Verdes, once "key employees" of a test equipment firm in Torrance, secretly set up a rival firm and conspired to submit inflated bids from the two companies that "misled" the Navy into thinking they were competitive.
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NATIONAL
September 28, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Customs Commissioner Robert C. Bonner disclosed Tuesday that he was stepping down after four tumultuous years as head of a key anti-terrorism agency. "I moved back to Washington on Sept. 10, 2001, and I've been going a mile a minute ever since the morning of 9/11," Bonner, 63, said in an interview. "I believe I have accomplished a lot here, but that's for others to judge. I do need a change." He is considering a return to private law practice in Los Angeles.
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NEWS
November 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The head of the Drug Enforcement Administration today dismissed as groundless reports that terrorists might have pierced a DEA undercover operation to plant the bomb that blew up Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. "In particular, we determined that no one on that aircraft was acting on behalf of, or was an informant of the DEA," the agency's administrator, Robert Bonner, said on NBC-TV's "Today" show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2005 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
The nation's top immigration enforcement official on Wednesday praised the work of citizen patrols along the U.S-Mexican border and said his agency is looking at creating a volunteer reserve program to help beef up security. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Robert C. Bonner said his initial concerns about possible vigilantism by citizen patrol groups have been eased by the volunteers' conduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989
U.S. Atty. Robert Bonner, the region's chief federal prosecutor, was sworn in Friday as the district's newest federal judge. Bonner, 46, was appointed to the U.S. District Court post by President Bush on May 22, four days after his confirmation by the U.S. Senate. In a courtroom packed with his colleagues, friends and family members, Bonner took his oath for the lifetime post from U.S. District Judge Albert L. Stephens. Gary A. Feess, chief assistant U.S. attorney, was named to take over for Bonner on an interim basis and oversee the 141-lawyer office until a replacement is nominated by Bush and confirmed by the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
Union spokesmen for striking NBC technicians and writers said Tuesday that they will go to court in an effort to overturn a federal judge's order that U.S. Atty. Robert Bonner open his new conferences to all news organizations--including NBC--regardless of their union affiliations. Carrie Biggs-Adams, president of the National Assn.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | MARILYN GARATEIX, Times Staff Writer
The Police Department has received $433,318 from the federal government for its help in an investigation that led to the recovery of $962,000 in drug money. The U. S. Treasury check, presented to the city on Monday by U. S. Atty. Robert Bonner, represents the largest amount the city has ever received for its assistance in a drug investigation, and one of the largest sums ever presented to a local law enforcement agency, Bonner said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1985 | BILL FARR, Times Staff Writer
Ten employees of three major aerospace companies were charged Wednesday with taking kickbacks on more than $1 million worth of contracts in what U.S. Atty. Robert Bonner said was "just the tip of the iceberg" in widespread bribery in Southern California's defense industry. At the time the kickbacks were allegedly solicited and paid, eight of the defendants worked for Hughes Aircraft Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2005 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
The nation's top immigration enforcement official on Wednesday praised the work of citizen patrols along the U.S-Mexican border and said his agency is looking at creating a volunteer reserve program to help beef up security. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Robert C. Bonner said his initial concerns about possible vigilantism by citizen patrol groups have been eased by the volunteers' conduct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2001 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush intends to nominate former federal judge Robert C. Bonner to head the U.S. Customs Service, White House officials said Wednesday. Bonner has headed the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and is a former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, which includes Los Angeles and six other Southern California counties.
NEWS
January 28, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert C. Bonner had not even moved into his new office as head of the U.S. Customs Service when the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks turned the routine task of border control into an urgent national priority and changed his job forever. The north tower of the World Trade Center collapsed on the Customs Service's largest office complex outside of Washington, destroying the eight-story building. (All 790 employees got out safely.) Customs inspectors, meanwhile, were urgently needed at the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2001 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush intends to nominate former federal judge Robert C. Bonner to head the U.S. Customs Service, White House officials said Wednesday. Bonner has headed the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and is a former U.S. attorney for the Central District of California, which includes Los Angeles and six other Southern California counties.
NEWS
October 31, 1993 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Departing Drug Enforcement Administration chief Robert C. Bonner is warning that the government is no longer "sending a clear signal" on illicit narcotics, and he questioned the Clinton Administration's strategy of focusing its efforts on treatment of hard-core drug addicts.
NEWS
November 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The head of the Drug Enforcement Administration today dismissed as groundless reports that terrorists might have pierced a DEA undercover operation to plant the bomb that blew up Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. "In particular, we determined that no one on that aircraft was acting on behalf of, or was an informant of the DEA," the agency's administrator, Robert Bonner, said on NBC-TV's "Today" show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989
U.S. Atty. Robert Bonner, the region's chief federal prosecutor, was sworn in Friday as the district's newest federal judge. Bonner, 46, was appointed to the U.S. District Court post by President Bush on May 22, four days after his confirmation by the U.S. Senate. In a courtroom packed with his colleagues, friends and family members, Bonner took his oath for the lifetime post from U.S. District Judge Albert L. Stephens. Gary A. Feess, chief assistant U.S. attorney, was named to take over for Bonner on an interim basis and oversee the 141-lawyer office until a replacement is nominated by Bush and confirmed by the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | MARILYN GARATEIX, Times Staff Writer
The Police Department has received $433,318 from the federal government for its help in an investigation that led to the recovery of $962,000 in drug money. The U. S. Treasury check, presented to the city on Monday by U. S. Atty. Robert Bonner, represents the largest amount the city has ever received for its assistance in a drug investigation, and one of the largest sums ever presented to a local law enforcement agency, Bonner said.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2005 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Customs Commissioner Robert C. Bonner disclosed Tuesday that he was stepping down after four tumultuous years as head of a key anti-terrorism agency. "I moved back to Washington on Sept. 10, 2001, and I've been going a mile a minute ever since the morning of 9/11," Bonner, 63, said in an interview. "I believe I have accomplished a lot here, but that's for others to judge. I do need a change." He is considering a return to private law practice in Los Angeles.
NEWS
January 28, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert C. Bonner had not even moved into his new office as head of the U.S. Customs Service when the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks turned the routine task of border control into an urgent national priority and changed his job forever. The north tower of the World Trade Center collapsed on the Customs Service's largest office complex outside of Washington, destroying the eight-story building. (All 790 employees got out safely.) Customs inspectors, meanwhile, were urgently needed at the U.S.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
Union spokesmen for striking NBC technicians and writers said Tuesday that they will go to court in an effort to overturn a federal judge's order that U.S. Atty. Robert Bonner open his new conferences to all news organizations--including NBC--regardless of their union affiliations. Carrie Biggs-Adams, president of the National Assn.
NEWS
March 28, 1986
Two Southland men rigged bids on testing equipment in a scheme to defraud the Navy of $200,000, U.S. Atty. Robert Bonner charged in a civil complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Bonner said Donald B. Schneider, 63, of Arcadia, and Fritz Egger, 49, of Rancho Palos Verdes, once "key employees" of a test equipment firm in Torrance, secretly set up a rival firm and conspired to submit inflated bids from the two companies that "misled" the Navy into thinking they were competitive.
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