Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Bourassa
IN THE NEWS

Robert Bourassa

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Bourassa, the former Quebec premier whose wily political maneuvers kept the province's separatists at bay and out of power for most of the last 26 years, died Wednesday of skin cancer in Montreal. He was 63. Few politicians have played such a central role in Canada's great struggle over whether French-speaking Quebec should remain a Canadian province or declare its independence. And Bourassa played his role with Machiavellian mastery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 3, 1996 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Bourassa, the former Quebec premier whose wily political maneuvers kept the province's separatists at bay and out of power for most of the last 26 years, died Wednesday of skin cancer in Montreal. He was 63. Few politicians have played such a central role in Canada's great struggle over whether French-speaking Quebec should remain a Canadian province or declare its independence. And Bourassa played his role with Machiavellian mastery.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 30, 1993 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of his 12 years as premier of the fickle province of Quebec, Robert Bourassa has been judged a competent technocrat on the economy--and a maddening waffler on the all-important questions of politics and language. With the French-speaking province forever threatening to secede, Canadians have wanted to see Quebec's premier either come out foursquare for independence or assert his wholehearted support for Canadian unity. But Bourassa has done neither.
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Premier Robert Bourassa of Quebec announced that he will not seek reelection next spring, a decision seen as a setback for the movement to keep the province together with the rest of Canada. Supporters of Bourassa, 60, who has battled cancer since 1990, credited him for easing tensions between English-speaking Canadians and the Francophones pushing for an independent Quebec.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa, ending a two-year boycott of Canada unity talks, agreed to attend a meeting Tuesday of provincial leaders called by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. The French-speaking province had refused to join reform talks since the attempt to satisfy its demands for greater political autonomy collapsed in June, 1990.
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Premier Robert Bourassa of Quebec announced that he will not seek reelection next spring, a decision seen as a setback for the movement to keep the province together with the rest of Canada. Supporters of Bourassa, 60, who has battled cancer since 1990, credited him for easing tensions between English-speaking Canadians and the Francophones pushing for an independent Quebec.
NEWS
September 26, 1989
Quebec voters swept Premier Robert Bourassa's Liberal Party back to power with a large although slightly reduced majority. Nearly complete election returns from the Canadian province indicated that the Liberals, campaigning on economic prosperity, were reelected or leading in 93 of 125 legislative seats against 30 seats for the French separatist Parti Quebecois. The Liberals held 98 seats in the previous 122-seat legislature, against 19 for the Parti Quebecois.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | From Reuters
Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa, ending a two-year boycott of political talks, met with leaders of the rest of Canada on Tuesday to try to resolve a decades-old separatist dispute. Bourassa met Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the premiers of English Canada's nine provinces to discuss reforms they agreed to last month that are aimed at keeping Quebec from breaking away.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | From Reuters
Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa on Thursday left the door open for his province to rejoin talks on Canada's future, but he said he has not yet been invited to do so. "We wish to develop within the Canadian federation--build Quebec without destroying Canada," he told a televised news conference in his first public reaction to a proposal for sweeping constitutional changes agreed on late Tuesday by Canada's nine English-speaking premiers.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crowd roared as a thin, spectacled man in a blue flannel suit came through the pillared doorway of a downtown convention center. Flashbulbs popped, television lights came on, and reporters homed in with their microphones. The premier of Quebec, Robert Bourassa, was about to address the Canadian people. "He's not at all charismatic," said Montreal newspaper editor Paul-Andre Comeau, but that doesn't matter. Robert Bourassa isn't just any Canadian politician, and these aren't ordinary times north of the 49th parallel.
NEWS
January 30, 1993 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For most of his 12 years as premier of the fickle province of Quebec, Robert Bourassa has been judged a competent technocrat on the economy--and a maddening waffler on the all-important questions of politics and language. With the French-speaking province forever threatening to secede, Canadians have wanted to see Quebec's premier either come out foursquare for independence or assert his wholehearted support for Canadian unity. But Bourassa has done neither.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | From Reuters
Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa, ending a two-year boycott of political talks, met with leaders of the rest of Canada on Tuesday to try to resolve a decades-old separatist dispute. Bourassa met Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the premiers of English Canada's nine provinces to discuss reforms they agreed to last month that are aimed at keeping Quebec from breaking away.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa, ending a two-year boycott of Canada unity talks, agreed to attend a meeting Tuesday of provincial leaders called by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. The French-speaking province had refused to join reform talks since the attempt to satisfy its demands for greater political autonomy collapsed in June, 1990.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | From Reuters
Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa on Thursday left the door open for his province to rejoin talks on Canada's future, but he said he has not yet been invited to do so. "We wish to develop within the Canadian federation--build Quebec without destroying Canada," he told a televised news conference in his first public reaction to a proposal for sweeping constitutional changes agreed on late Tuesday by Canada's nine English-speaking premiers.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Queen Elizabeth II plunged deep into Canada's troubled political waters Sunday as she helped Canadians celebrate their national holiday with visits to both the English- and French-speaking sides of this bilingual capital city. "I am not just a fair-weather friend, and I am glad to be here at this sensitive time," the queen told a crowd of about 70,000 well-wishers on the lawns of the Canadian Parliament building.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the grand finale of a huge nationalistic parade here, organizers had planned to unfurl a 90-foot Quebec flag from the heights of the city's Olympic Stadium. But just as one edge of the great blue and white fleur de lis began to drop, the wind caught it, tangling it in a bank of lights. Far below, 200,000 celebrants watched, dismayed, on Monday as the minutes ticked by and the flag stayed stubbornly trapped.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Queen Elizabeth II plunged deep into Canada's troubled political waters Sunday as she helped Canadians celebrate their national holiday with visits to both the English- and French-speaking sides of this bilingual capital city. "I am not just a fair-weather friend, and I am glad to be here at this sensitive time," the queen told a crowd of about 70,000 well-wishers on the lawns of the Canadian Parliament building.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the grand finale of a huge nationalistic parade here, organizers had planned to unfurl a 90-foot Quebec flag from the heights of the city's Olympic Stadium. But just as one edge of the great blue and white fleur de lis began to drop, the wind caught it, tangling it in a bank of lights. Far below, 200,000 celebrants watched, dismayed, on Monday as the minutes ticked by and the flag stayed stubbornly trapped.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The crowd roared as a thin, spectacled man in a blue flannel suit came through the pillared doorway of a downtown convention center. Flashbulbs popped, television lights came on, and reporters homed in with their microphones. The premier of Quebec, Robert Bourassa, was about to address the Canadian people. "He's not at all charismatic," said Montreal newspaper editor Paul-Andre Comeau, but that doesn't matter. Robert Bourassa isn't just any Canadian politician, and these aren't ordinary times north of the 49th parallel.
NEWS
May 29, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a packed bus rolling through the streets of Canada's bilingual capital, Ottawa, the driver called out, "Please move to the rear of the bus," in heavily French-Canadian-accented English. Out of the crowd of passengers came a loud, sarcastic retort, and a sign of the times: "Yes, move to the back and make room for French-Canadians!" Separatism is back in Canada, after a 10-year time of peace.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|