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Robert Brock

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1990
First of all, the blacks who were sold into slavery were sold by other Africans. Second, my heritage is Indian (Cherokee). I am one-fourth, so why don't I have all the lands that my great-grandfather used to own? Don't give me Robert Brock. Give me my land back. RICHARD L. TAYLOR Long Beach
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1990
It was with growing anger that I read the article (Metro, Dec. 10) detailing Robert Brock's desire for "reparations" for black Americans. To say that I, a 26-year-old white American, am responsible for things done to long dead black Americans by equally long dead white Americans is an affront to intelligence. Brock would have, I suppose, all white Americans have a special tax levied on them because of their race. This would be done in order to punish white people for the sins of their race.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1990 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cathy Brock had only been to see her father once at Orange County Jail in all the months he was there. It had been too hard on both of them, she said. But she had written to him. She had told him how sorry she was that "you had to give up your life to see me happy." The letter upset him. He told the family: Tell Cathy she is not to blame. She is not to blame. James Joseph Rovida Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 130 years after the death of American slavery, Robert Brock is still fighting for his 40 acres and a mule. Plus interest. For the better part of his adult life, the 66-year-old Brock has been campaigning in churches, community centers and colleges for an idea whose time, he says, is overdue: reparations for the descendants of the captive Africans who helped build the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 130 years after the death of American slavery, Robert Brock is still fighting for his 40 acres and a mule. Plus interest. For the better part of his adult life, the 66-year-old Brock has been campaigning in churches, community centers and colleges for an idea whose time, he says, is overdue: reparations for the descendants of the captive Africans who helped build the nation.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
A 34-year-old man was found shot to death early today on the front lawn of a home in Orange, and police say they have been unable to establish a motive and have no suspects. The body of Robert Brock was found with two gunshot wounds at 1402 E. Quincy St., where he apparently lived, Orange Police Sgt. Tom Jordan said. Investigators also found what they described as a medium-caliber pistol at the residence, but it was not known if it was the weapon that killed Brock.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1989
A 34-year-old man was found shot to death on his front lawn in Orange early Thursday, authorities said. The body of Robert Brock was found on the lawn of his home in the 1400 block of East Quincy Street, Police Sgt. Tom Jordan said. Investigators also found what they described as a medium-caliber pistol at the residence, but it was not immediately clear whether that was the weapon that killed Brock, Jordan said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1998
Your music industry reporting is a nauseating failure--precisely because it's always raw industry information, and very infrequently about the music or the musicians themselves. Sadly, the focus is usually on dollars, chart rankings, marketing strategies, career angles and trend identification. What a heinous bore! One sentence about what kind of guitar Courtney Love likes to play is worth 50 paragraphs about how many units "Celebrity Skin" is projected to sell. Get a brain, a heart and a life.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | From Times wire service s
A 53-year-old Los Alamitos man was arrested in connection with the shooting death of his son-in-law, who was found dead on his front lawn in Orange, police said today. James Rovida Jr., a self-employed truck driver, was being held in Orange County Jail today on suspicion of murder, Orange Police Detective Dave Hill said. The body of Rovida's son-in-law, Robert Brock, was found about 3 a.m. Thursday on the front lawn of a Quincy Avenue home that Brock shared with his sister, Hill said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1989
I read with sadness the letters you printed in reaction to the interview (with) John Lydon ("The World According to . . . John Lydon " by Kristine McKenna, Calendar, May 14). I think Lydon is grossly misunderstood. His message to me is one of hope and productive change. (He calls for) intelligent scrutiny of the pop music establishment, which is overfed, greedy and self-congratulatory. If the folks who dislike Lydon are insecure about their own pop heroes, then they argue Lydon's point for him and validate all that he stands for. Without apology for his caustic manner and the lame records he makes, the man is a gentleman, a scholar and unquestionably one of the most valuable philosophical voices on pop culture and music of our time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1990 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cathy Brock had only been to see her father once at Orange County Jail in all the months he was there. It had been too hard on both of them, she said. But she had written to him. She had told him how sorry she was that "you had to give up your life to see me happy." The letter upset him. He told the family: Tell Cathy she is not to blame. She is not to blame. James Joseph Rovida Jr.
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